House of Commons Hansard #194 of the 37th Parliament, 1st Session. (The original version is on Parliament's site.) The word of the day was public.

Topics

Ethics
Oral Question Period

2:55 p.m.

Calgary Southwest
Alberta

Canadian Alliance

Stephen Harper Leader of the Opposition

Mr. Speaker, I want to get clarification on something the Prime Minister said earlier in question period. We want to get to the bottom of the ethical standards of the Prime Minister and the government.

Is it really his position that a minister of the crown has not only the right but the responsibility to directly lobby officials or agencies under his direct supervision to get favours for friends or family members? Is that really his position?

Ethics
Oral Question Period

2:55 p.m.

Saint-Maurice
Québec

Liberal

Jean Chrétien Prime Minister

Mr. Speaker, a minister, a member of the cabinet is a member of parliament and a minister is responsible for his province. He has the duty to pass requests that come into his office to any agency in the government. It is for the agency to say yes or no.

In that case, if there was lobbying, and there was no lobbying, it was a transmission of a request. The request did not receive a favourable answer because the commissioner reported to him, when they discussed it, that the RCMP had decided it did not have the funds to proceed with the request.

Ethics
Oral Question Period

2:55 p.m.

Calgary Southwest
Alberta

Canadian Alliance

Stephen Harper Leader of the Opposition

Mr. Speaker, the responsibility of ministers of the crown is to act in the interests of all Canadians, not as private lobbyists.

I have a second question. For days members from all parties have been asking the minister of immigration to clarify statements he made as a minister of the crown contradicting himself on whether he stayed at the Boulay chalet.

I am asking the Prime Minister and the Deputy Prime Minister to stop stonewalling on this and allow the minister of immigration to answer this question. Why did he contradict himself?

Ethics
Oral Question Period

2:55 p.m.

Saint-Maurice
Québec

Liberal

Jean Chrétien Prime Minister

Mr. Speaker, a minister replies to questions about his ministry. It is a rule of the House of Commons.

Talking about stonewalling, when will he give us the names of the people who contributed to his campaign? When will he tell us who was funding the National Citizens' Coalition? Attacking every politician, never revealing his salary and never giving the source of the funds, all is completely hidden when it is the case of that party across. It is unbelievable that they have double standards like that.

Status of Women
Oral Question Period

2:55 p.m.

Liberal

Anita Neville Winnipeg South Centre, MB

Mr. Speaker, on a different topic, my question is for the Secretary of State for Multiculturalism and the Status of Women.

Today the Quebec Council on the Status of Women made public its research on prostitution and the trafficking of women.

Could the secretary of state tell the House what the federal government is doing to address what is a very serious issue?

Status of Women
Oral Question Period

2:55 p.m.

Etobicoke—Lakeshore
Ontario

Liberal

Jean Augustine Secretary of State (Multiculturalism) (Status of Women)

Mr. Speaker, I want to take the opportunity to thank to my colleague for giving me the opportunity to answer the first question in my new role.

Canada is committed to preventing and combating the trafficking of women. On May 14 we signed the United Nations protocol to prevent, suppress and punish traffic in persons, especially women and children. The Status of Women has put in a lot of work with communities with responses to that very negative issue.

G-8 Summit
Oral Question Period

2:55 p.m.

Canadian Alliance

Myron Thompson Wild Rose, AB

Mr. Speaker, last Friday the government released its compensation package for those affected by the G-8 summit. I have a document in my possession from a prominent insurance company in Canada in which it states that since September 11 it will no longer cover acts of terrorism.

Surely the minister agrees that the violence at G-8 summits in the past goes well beyond vandalism and is considered terrorism. Does the minister have a plan for those who will be denied private insurance coverage due to acts of terrorism?

G-8 Summit
Oral Question Period

2:55 p.m.

Cardigan
P.E.I.

Liberal

Lawrence MacAulay Solicitor General of Canada

Mr. Speaker, of course we have a process in place to make sure that for any damage that takes place and is directly involved with the G-8, people are compensated.

G-8 Summit
Oral Question Period

3 p.m.

Canadian Alliance

Myron Thompson Wild Rose, AB

Mr. Speaker, I have gone over this compensation package and it is very apparent that the claims decisions are discretionary, subjective and in the hands of government bureaucrats.

Will the minister give a definition of extraordinary costs for an individual? Will a person's house be covered or just the broken windows? Will a person's car be covered? What about bodily harm?

G-8 Summit
Oral Question Period

3 p.m.

Cardigan
P.E.I.

Liberal

Lawrence MacAulay Solicitor General of Canada

Mr. Speaker, as my hon. colleague is probably aware, we dealt with the province of Alberta to make sure that we came up with an appropriate agreement before everything was agreed to, to have the G-8 in Kananaskis. We have the agreement of the city of Calgary and the province of Alberta and the G-8 will be a very successful and safe event.

Government Contracts
Oral Question Period

3 p.m.

Bloc

Michel Gauthier Roberval, QC

Mr. Speaker, the contract awarded to Robert-Guy Scully through Lafleur Communications for a series on Maurice “Rocket” Richard is being investigated by the police. We know that a new $2 million contract has been awarded to Robert-Guy Scully for a series on innovation and entrepreneurship.

Given the fact that Scully has had serious difficulties relating to the funding of the Heritage Minutes and that his series on the Rocket is under police investigation, would the minister of public works not find it advisable to suspend the contract for the Innovation and Entrepreneurship series until such time as the police investigation is over, as he has announced will be done in the case of the communications firms under investigation?

Government Contracts
Oral Question Period

3 p.m.

Wascana
Saskatchewan

Liberal

Ralph Goodale Minister of Public Works and Government Services

Mr. Speaker, I will take the hon. gentleman's question as a representation. I will review the file and see if there is any information in the hands of the Department of Public Works and Government Services that would in any way raise other questions, as has been suggested in the question, that would need to be followed up. If so, I will follow them up.

International Cooperation
Oral Question Period

3 p.m.

Liberal

Bernard Patry Pierrefonds—Dollard, QC

Mr. Speaker, the Minister for International Cooperation is in Africa at this time, attending the annual assembly of the African Development Bank in Addis Ababa, Ethiopia.

Can the minister's parliamentary secretary explain to us the commitments made in the past few days by our government in connection with the urgent problems of African development, for example in the areas of agriculture, health and nutrition, good governance and equality of the sexes?

International Cooperation
Oral Question Period

3 p.m.

Notre-Dame-de-Grâce—Lachine
Québec

Liberal

Marlene Jennings Parliamentary Secretary to the Minister for International Cooperation

Mr. Speaker, today in Ethiopia the Minister for International Cooperation announced $93 million for some very important initiatives in Africa.

For instance, $74.5 million will go to the African Development Bank for loans to the poorest African countries. Another $10.5 million is earmarked for farmers and shepherds, and $7.95 million to foster good governance and equality between the sexes.

This government continues in its determination to address urgent development problems in Africa.

Foreign Affairs
Oral Question Period

May 29th, 2002 / 3 p.m.

Canadian Alliance

Gurmant Grewal Surrey Central, BC

Mr. Speaker, to ease tension between India and Pakistan, world leaders are playing a role in preventive diplomacy but the Canadian government is sidelined. That is not surprising given the inconsistent and haphazard foreign policies of the government.

In 1996, the Prime Minister led a team Canada mission to India. In 1998, the Liberals unwisely imposed sanctions against both India and Pakistan in a knee-jerk reaction to their nuclear tests. In 2001, the government decided to lift the sanctions.

Given its erratic policy, does the Liberal government have any influence left in the region?