House of Commons Hansard #197 of the 37th Parliament, 1st Session. (The original version is on Parliament's site.) The word of the day was animals.

Topics

Petitions
Routine Proceedings

3:20 p.m.

Liberal

Beth Phinney Hamilton Mountain, ON

Mr. Speaker, I have a petition signed by many hundreds of Canadians who are calling upon parliament to enact legislation that would allow the federal government to work in tandem with provincial and municipal governments to ensure that the ongoing needs and potential for growth of each and every Canadian humane society, SPCA and registered wildlife sanctuary shelter are met without infringing upon the operational philosophy of any of the above mentioned animal facilities.

Questions on the Order Paper
Routine Proceedings

June 3rd, 2002 / 3:20 p.m.

Halifax West
Nova Scotia

Liberal

Geoff Regan Parliamentary Secretary to the Leader of the Government in the House of Commons

Mr. Speaker, Question No. 143 will be answered today.

Question No. 143
Routine Proceedings

3:20 p.m.

Progressive Conservative

Elsie Wayne Saint John, NB

Concerning the Canadian Mortgage and Housing Corporation programs to assist handicapped persons make modifications to a residence, does the government have plans to raise the income threshold for assistance and is there a process of automatic review of the threshold?

Question No. 143
Routine Proceedings

3:20 p.m.

Mississauga West
Ontario

Liberal

Steve Mahoney Parliamentary Secretary to the Deputy Prime Minister and Minister of Infrastructure and Crown Corporations

The residential rehabilitation assistance program for persons with disabilities, RRAP-D, provides financial assistance to improve the accessibility of existing properties occupied or intended to be occupied by low-income persons with disabilities. To operationalize this objective, income thresholds for various unit sizes have been developed in all areas of the country to income test clients under the CMHC renovation programs, including RRAP-D.

The income thresholds are based on the median market rent, MMR, for units of different sizes. Given these MMRs, it is possible to compute the minimum annual income required for a household to afford adequate and suitable rental units in a geographic area without spending more than 30% of income. In areas where rental options are non-existent or severely lacking, the annual income required to afford the cost of financing and servicing various sized modest single detached units is utilized. This approach assumes that where there are no rental units, an appropriate housing solution involves the construction of a dwelling.

Depending on the jurisdiction and the applicable federal-provincial-territorial agreements in place, the income thresholds are reviewed on an annual basis or, at a minimum, once every five years. Increases are implemented if they are warranted.

Questions Passed as Orders for Returns
Routine Proceedings

3:20 p.m.

Halifax West
Nova Scotia

Liberal

Geoff Regan Parliamentary Secretary to the Leader of the Government in the House of Commons

Mr. Speaker, if Question No. 149 could be made an order for return, the return would be tabled immediately.

Questions Passed as Orders for Returns
Routine Proceedings

3:20 p.m.

The Speaker

Is that agreed?

Questions Passed as Orders for Returns
Routine Proceedings

3:20 p.m.

Some hon. members

Agreed.

Question No. 149
Routine Proceedings

3:20 p.m.

Canadian Alliance

Garry Breitkreuz Yorkton—Melville, SK

With regard to the Canadian Firearms Program: ( a ) what is the total amount of money spent on the program since 1995; ( b ) how many employees are working in and for the program; ( c ) how many police officers and police personnel are working in the program; ( d ) how many employees in the program are paid for by the federal government; ( e ) what is the total number of firearms registered; ( f ) what is the total number of firearms still to be registered; ( g ) how many firearms transfers have there been since December 1, 1998; ( h ) what is the total number of valid firearms licence holders; ( i ) what is the total number of gun owners that still don't have a firearms licence; ( j ) what is the error rate in the firearms licencing and registration system; ( k ) in what percentage of all violent crimes are firearms actually used in the commission of the offence; ( l ) what percentage of all homicides are committed with handguns and prohibited firearms; ( m ) what percentage of firearms homicides are committed with registered firearms; ( n ) what percentage of firearms homicides are committed with firearms that should have been registered but were not; ( o ) what percentage of all homicides are committed with long guns; ( p ) what percentage of all robberies are committed with handguns and prohibited firearms; ( q ) what percentage of all robberies are committed with long guns; ( r ) how many times are firearms used by citizens for self-defence every year; ( s ) how many individuals have a record in the Firearms Interest Police data base; ( t ) how many people are prohibited from owning firearms; ( u ) how many violations of these firearms prohibition orders have there been; ( v ) how many guns have been seized from these prohibited firearms owners; ( w ) how many times have these prohibited firearms owners been checked to make sure they have not acquired firearms illegally; ( x ) how many people have had their firearms licences refused or revoked; ( y ) how many guns have been seized from these refused and revoked licencees; and ( z ) how many times have these refused and revoked licencees been checked to make sure they have not acquired firearms illegally?

Return tabled.

Question No. 149
Routine Proceedings

3:20 p.m.

Liberal

Geoff Regan Halifax West, NS

Mr. Speaker, I ask that the remaining questions be allowed to stand.

Question No. 149
Routine Proceedings

3:20 p.m.

The Speaker

Is that agreed?

Question No. 149
Routine Proceedings

3:20 p.m.

Some hon. members

Agreed.

The House resumed from May 10 consideration of the motion that Bill C-15B, an act to amend the Criminal Code (cruelty to animals and firearms) and the Firearms Act, be read the third time and passed; and of the amendment and of the amendment to the amendment.

An Act to amend the Criminal Code (cruelty to animals and firearms) and the Firearms Act
Government Orders

3:20 p.m.

Canadian Alliance

Carol Skelton Saskatoon—Rosetown—Biggar, SK

Mr. Speaker, I rise this afternoon with a heavy heart to speak to Bill C-15B, the cruelty to animals act.

Farmers and ranchers in Canada are facing hardships like we have not seen in recent years. The old timers in our area are saying that it is worse than the 1930s. The economy is bad, the weather conditions are bad and we are facing a severe drought.

The future of agriculture in Saskatchewan is uncertain. The stress and worry that our farm families are facing is hard to grasp. Over the last two weeks we have sent letters out to all the rural municipalities in my riding. By next Wednesday at least, the RMs in my whole riding will have been declared disaster RMs.

We look at farm families and what they have to live on. I heard last fall that the average income for a farm family in Saskatchewan was $7,000. I look at the bill as another impediment for those farm families to make a living and to succeed. The livestock industry in our province has been one success. The bill is just another nail in the coffin of profitable business.

Also of great concern to the province of Saskatchewan and right across Canada is the recent U.S. farm bill. The huge subsidies that the American government are offering American producers will have a definite negative effect on Canadian agriculture as a whole. Input costs continue to rise while income to farm families continues to fall. Faced with this crisis situation the Liberal government chooses to turn a blind eye to agriculture programs in Canada because it continues to inadequately fund them and inefficiently run them. These are programs that the government sponsors and says are so good for our farm families.

While the neglect shown by the government has been passive, the bill that is before us today is an open, aggressive attack on agriculture. This is not fearmongering, as the government would like Canadians to believe. It is a simple fact. The legislation before us would have a negative effect on farmers and ranchers throughout the country. When we talk to chicken farmers--

An Act to amend the Criminal Code (cruelty to animals and firearms) and the Firearms Act
Government Orders

3:25 p.m.

The Speaker

I hesitate to interrupt the hon. member, but I made a mistake in recognizing her. The hon. member has already spoken on this subamendment so she is not eligible to speak again unless there is unanimous consent to permit her to make this speech. Is there unanimous consent for the hon. member to speak a second time?

An Act to amend the Criminal Code (cruelty to animals and firearms) and the Firearms Act
Government Orders

3:25 p.m.

Some hon. members

Agreed.