House of Commons Hansard #201 of the 37th Parliament, 1st Session. (The original version is on Parliament's site.) The word of the day was broadcasting.

Topics

Official Languages Act
Statements By Members

11 a.m.

Liberal

Mauril Bélanger Ottawa—Vanier, ON

Mr. Speaker, today I wish to praise Mr. Louis Quigley, a resident of Riverview, New Brunswick. Mr. Quigley took on the proverbial city hall and won. City hall in this case is us: the House of Commons, its Board of Internal Economy and the Attorney General of Canada.

On June 5 the trial division of the Federal Court of Canada ruled that the House of Commons was obliged to respect the Official Languages Act. Can members imagine? What a revolutionary concept: We legislators are subject to our own laws.

The court ruled that the House is obliged to ensure that our debates are available in English or French as per every Canadian's choice. I hope the House will accept the wisdom of this decision and proceed to its implementation.

I say bravo to Mr. Quigley, an exemplary Canadian.

Petits chanteurs de Laval and Voix boréales
Statements By Members

11 a.m.

Liberal

Raymonde Folco Laval West, QC

Mr. Speaker, two choirs, the Petits chanteurs de Laval and the Voix boréales, have once again had a hugely successful season both in Canada and abroad.

After China and Japan, the Petits chanteurs de Laval and the Voix boréales will be in concert throughout the summer, in just about every part of Canada, performing numbers from their 20 years of repertoire.

Their performances feature songs in French and in English, but they also have songs in numerous other languages, such as Chinese and Zulu.

This fall, these young singers from Laval will perform for New Yorkers in Carnegie Hall.

These experiences provide the young people with a great deal of pleasure as well as the opportunity to be part of a group. These experiences will prepare them to be Canadian citizens who are well prepared to take an active part in the life of our beautiful country.

Blood Samples Act
Statements By Members

11 a.m.

Canadian Alliance

Chuck Strahl Fraser Valley, BC

Mr. Speaker, three years ago I tabled a bill that would protect the rights of professionals and good Samaritans who risk contracting a disease when exposed to someone else's bodily fluids.

Isobel Anderson, an Ottawa police officer, was one of the bill's earliest supporters. At committee meetings, community events and press conferences she told the heart wrenching story of how she was stabbed with a blood filled needle. Yet there was and is no law that compels a suspect to give a blood sample to help determine a course of medical treatment. Her efforts helped push the good Samaritans act to the committee stage twice and onto the agendas of the Attorneys General of Canada and the Uniform Law Conference of Canada.

Like other police officers, Ms. Anderson does more than just enforce the law. Her colleagues look up to her and she is often a source of advice and comfort for others facing similar nightmares. Her outstanding achievements have been recognized by her peers and she has now been nominated for the Ontario Women in Law Enforcement Award.

We wish Isobel Anderson the best during the selection process, but more important, we thank her and thousands of other police officers who give of themselves every day to make our lives better.

National Defence
Statements By Members

11:05 a.m.

Liberal

Robert Bertrand Pontiac—Gatineau—Labelle, QC

Mr. Speaker, I would like to draw attention to an event that occurred last fall with virtually no media attention and no opposition questions here in the House.

That event was the beginning of a new era as far as Canadian search and rescue is concerned. Last October, the 442 Squadron of Comox, British Columbia, officially accepted the first of a series of helicopters, the Augusta-Westland CH-149 Cormorants.

The Cormorants will provide Canada with one of the best search and rescue capacities in the world. Their acquisition will greatly enhance the capacities of our armed forces.

Military experts are unanimous in their praise of the Cormorant, citing its utility in a country where extreme climatic conditions make search and rescue operations the most difficult in the world.

Crews testing the CH-149 were quick to realize its virtues and its great suitability for emergency situations.

Transition from the Labrador to the Cormorant will be a gradual process, with the last Labrador phased out in 2003.

Oceans Day
Statements By Members

11:05 a.m.

Bloc

Monique Guay Laurentides, QC

Mr. Speaker, this year's theme of Oceans Day is “Give Ocean Life a Safe Harbour From Climate Change”. It reminds us of the role that oceans play as a source of life throughout the world.

First proclaimed ten years ago during the United Nations Earth Summit, the World Oceans Day is seen as a means to educate people about the health of oceans.

In the riding of Rimouski-Neigette-et-la Mitis, the Norjoli school and les Jardins de Métis have come together to develop a project to highlight the importance of the St. Lawrence River and the oceans. The objective of the project is to raise awareness among youth and the public of the resources found in the river and the oceans and of the need to preserve and protect them.

The St. Lawrence River, estuary and the Gulf of St. Lawrence contain a great diversity of animals and plants. The resources and the majestic lands along its shores influence the lives of thousands of people and provide for a variety of activities: fishing, swimming, boating, industry and ecotourism. It is the responsibility of each and everyone of us to preserve their beauty and health.

Seniors Month
Statements By Members

11:05 a.m.

Liberal

Gurbax Malhi Bramalea—Gore—Malton—Springdale, ON

Mr. Speaker, I am pleased to remind my colleagues in the House and all Canadians that in many provinces June is celebrated as Seniors Month.

It is a time to recognize the contribution that seniors bring to our communities and to reflect on the impact that Canada's aging population will have on our society. The implications of an aging society will be profound and enduring, and we need to work together to address this significant social change.

This was the focus of the Second World Assembly on Ageing held in Madrid in April. The conference provided Canada with an opportunity to share its knowledge in the area of aging, to learn from the experience of other countries and to build a stronger direction for the future.

Canada is well positioned to respond to these challenges. I encourage all of us to draw from the contributions of all of our citizens, young, old and very old, in order to build a stronger society for all ages.

Agriculture
Statements By Members

11:05 a.m.

Canadian Alliance

Garry Breitkreuz Yorkton—Melville, SK

Mr. Speaker, next week five farmers will go on trial in Lethbridge, Alberta for exporting their own grain into the United States. The sad and hypocritical fact is that if they had lived in Ontario or Quebec they would not have broken any laws. On March 4 a National Post editorial titled “Prairie Injustice” pointed out the real problem:

It is unconscionable that farmers may not legally sell the fruits of their labour to whomever they please--

The Liberal government simply overrides fundamental property rights whenever it suits its agenda and fails to understand the concept of freedom of contract.

Here is another outrageous example: Organic farmers in the prairies are forced to sell their grain to the wheat board and buy it back before they can sell it to their customers. This, despite the fact that the board does not even market organic grains. Bill and Myrita Rees in my riding estimate the cost to them on a 1,000 bushel load of grain is $2,800.

When is this government going to start treating prairie farmers just like other Canadian farmers?

Tourism
Statements By Members

11:05 a.m.

Liberal

R. John Efford Bonavista—Trinity—Conception, NL

Mr. Speaker, I am pleased to stand here today to represent the people of Newfoundland and Labrador and share with the House some of the successes of our province.

Tourism is one of the fastest growing industries in Atlantic Canada, with its annual rate of growth outpacing all traditional sectors. It is estimated that tourism salaries and spending inject some $3.8 billion into the economy of our region each year. That is why the ACOA agency has made tourism a strategic priority and supports local initiatives such as the root cellar project in the town of Elliston in my riding of Bonavista--Trinity--Conception.

Elliston is a small community of approximately 400 people located on the northeastern tip of the Bonavista Peninsula. Once a busy fishing settlement, it is now a popular tourist destination known as the root cellar capital of the world. With 135 documented root cellars, some of which have survived nearly two centuries, Elliston is a cultural centre for those who want to understand early Newfoundland subsistence.

Promotion of the cellars has resulted in national and international recognition. Each summer Tourism Elliston Inc. hosts a four day festival which attracts up to 14,000 visitors--

Tourism
Statements By Members

11:05 a.m.

The Speaker

The hon. member for Windsor--St. Clair.

Crtc
Statements By Members

June 7th, 2002 / 11:10 a.m.

NDP

Joe Comartin Windsor—St. Clair, ON

Mr. Speaker, by refusing to overturn a seriously flawed CRTC decision ignoring its own guidelines in the granting of a broadcasting license to Craig Broadcast Systems Inc. the cabinet has shown a complete disregard for the local programming and Canadian content requirements of the Broadcasting Act.

As a result of this fundamentally flawed decision already underserviced communities like Windsor, dominated by American programming, could see and probably will see a substantial decline in local programming. The decision completely ignores the needs of communities in southern Ontario like Hamilton and Kitchener--Waterloo. If not reversed it will result in the falling by the wayside of local programming and services over the next decade.

The Liberal government has once again shown a complete lack of commitment to promoting local content and diversity in broadcasting in the country.

Wharf Maintenance
Statements By Members

11:10 a.m.

Bloc

Paul Crête Kamouraska—Rivière-Du-Loup—Témiscouata—Les Basques, QC

Mr. Speaker, today residents of Trois-Pistoles came to ask the Minister of Transport to put an end to the horror story that has put the 2002 Basques ferry season on hold, due to the federal government's irresponsibility in allowing the wharf to deteriorate over the past five years.

The minister must today announce that the 2002 season will be saved and that the wharves of Trois-Pistoles and les Escoumins will be repaired. Otherwise the minister will have adopted an inexplicably arrogant attitude, and his negligence will have deprived 30 crew members and others who work in the region's tourism industry of their livelihood.

The federal government owns the wharves. The federal government is responsible for the deterioration of the situation. It must provide the service, or else compensate the population and those who have lost their jobs because of the Minister of Transport's inefficiency.

Skate Canada Hall of Fame
Statements By Members

11:10 a.m.

Liberal

Sarmite Bulte Parkdale—High Park, ON

Mr. Speaker, I wish to pay tribute today to Elvis Stojko, three time world champion in 1994, 1995 and 1997 and two time Olympic silver medalist in 1994 and 1998. I am pleased to announce that Elvis Stojko will be inducted into the Skate Canada Hall of Fame in 2003. After representing Canada so well for 10 years, Mr. Stojko announced his retirement shortly after the Salt Lake City Olympic Games.

In addition to Elvis Stojko the following individuals will also be inducted into the hall of fame at a ceremony that will take place at the Canadian Figure Skating Championships in Saskatoon on January 13, 2003: Tracy Wilson and the late Rob McCall, Olympic bronze and world championship bronze medalists in 1998; coach Michael Jiranek who was the mentor behind Kurt Browning's international successes; and Barbara Graham, a lifelong dedicated administrator in the sport.

I congratulate all of them.

Fisheries
Statements By Members

11:10 a.m.

Progressive Conservative

Gerald Keddy South Shore, NS

Mr. Speaker, the government insists it is patrolling overfishing on the nose and tail of the Grand Banks and the Flemish Cap, so let us take a look at the record.

From 1990 to 1993 when this government was not in power there were 65 seaborne surveillance missions and 500 air surveillance missions. From 1993 to 1997 that average started to drop once the government got in power until there were 58 sea surveillance missions and 475 air surveillance missions. From 1997 to 2000 it dropped again until there were 40 surveillance missions by ship and 450 by air.

Let us look at the record in 2001 when the government said it was protecting the nose and tail of the Grand Banks and the Flemish Cap. In 2001 there were 31 sea surveillance missions and 467 by air. In 2002, and let us understand that the year is half gone, there have been only 10 sea patrols and 166 air patrols.

That is a sad and sorry--

Fisheries
Statements By Members

11:10 a.m.

The Speaker

The hon. member for Ottawa Centre.

Thyroid Month
Statements By Members

11:10 a.m.

Liberal

Mac Harb Ottawa Centre, ON

Mr. Speaker, I am pleased to inform the House and all Canadians that June is Thyroid Month in Canada.

Approximately 15 million North Americans have thyroid disease and many do not know it. An untreated, abnormally functioning thyroid can lead to cardiovascular disease, osteoporosis, anxiety and depression.

The Thyroid Foundation of Canada, a non-profit registered volunteer organization with 23 chapters across Canada, promotes awareness and education about thyroid disease and raises much needed funds. Health Canada has funded the development of a thyroid assessment questionnaire to open physician-patient dialogue on thyroid symptoms and has developed a special program to ensure the accuracy of thyroid testing.

I invite hon. colleagues to join me in supporting Thyroid Month in Canada.