House of Commons Hansard #143 of the 37th Parliament, 2nd Session. (The original version is on Parliament's site.) The word of the day was veterans.

Topics

Liberal Government
Statements By Members

11:05 a.m.

Liberal

Yolande Thibeault Saint-Lambert, QC

Mr. Speaker, I am pleased to speak today to acknowledge a very important anniversary.

Tomorrow, October 25, is the tenth anniversary of the Liberal Party's victory under the leadership of the right hon. member for Saint-Maurice.

Because of the proactive agenda of the government he has led, the country has enjoyed tremendous economic growth and been able to maintain quality public services.

On this tenth anniversary, we have much to celebrate and we should be proud of our achievements. The future will be built on our successes because we have put this country on solid footing.

We are now ready for a new mandate.

Conservative Party
Statements By Members

11:05 a.m.

Canadian Alliance

Inky Mark Dauphin—Swan River, MB

Mr. Speaker, the biggest democratic deficit in Canada is the lack of opportunity for the electorate to change the government of the day.

The success of a proposed merger between the Alliance and the PC Party will stop the Liberals from winning successive elections by default through vote splitting. There are too many parties in the House of Commons fragmenting the votes to the point that the Liberals formed the government in 1993 with only 37% of the votes.

Canadians need a real option to the Liberals in the next election capable of forming a government. That is why a merger of Canada's two conservative parties is good for both our country and democracy. With a reunited Conservative Party our votes will really count. We will have the potential to throw out an unwanted government.

The leader of the Progressive Conservative Party and the leader of the official opposition have earned our thanks for putting the country and democracy first. They deserve the support of all Canadians.

United Nations Day
Statements By Members

11:10 a.m.

Liberal

Sophia Leung Vancouver Kingsway, BC

Mr. Speaker, today is United Nations Day. It was 58 years ago today that the United Nations charter came into force. It was a coming together of countries in the hope of creating a better world based on common principles and rule of law.

The challenges facing us in the world today are no less daunting than in 1945. In some areas, we have progressed immeasurably; in others, we face new challenges. These only underline the vital role and importance of collaborative international efforts and institutions such as the United Nations.

Canada was a leader in the creation of the original UN charter in 1945. We continue to play a leading role in the world. I am sure all Canadians will join me in celebrating this year's United Nation's Day.

Imprimerie Dumaine
Statements By Members

11:10 a.m.

Bloc

Yvan Loubier Saint-Hyacinthe—Bagot, QC

Mr. Speaker, on October 20, the Saint-Hyacinthe chamber of commerce, the Local Development Centre and the BDC named Imprimerie Dumaine small business of the year.

It is an honour to join the entire community in congratulating Marc Dumaine, his associate Mario Haineault, and the entire team at Imprimerie Dumaine on the excellent work they have been doing since 1988.

Over the years, Imprimerie Dumaine has taken advantage of the creativity of its managers, and new technology, to build an increasingly larger client base.

Dynamic companies such as this one have helped Saint-Hyacinthe enjoy continued economic growth and a very low unemployment rate. We should thank more often these small businesses and the people running them for generating wealth and thousands of jobs in the area.

Once again, I would like to commend Imprimerie Dumaine for contributing to the fame of the Saint-Hyacinthe area.

Prime Minister of Canada
Statements By Members

11:10 a.m.

Liberal

Ivan Grose Oshawa, ON

Mr. Speaker, tomorrow is the Prime Minister's 10th anniversary.

He has led the government to three consecutive majority governments. Since day one, the government has pursued a bold, forward-looking agenda that has never faltered, and has been devoted to building a healthy and prosperous Canada.

We have much to celebrate and much to be proud of. As one who was here in those early, heady days in 1993 I share with so many of my colleagues a sense of accomplishment. As the Prime Minister said back then, we had a lot of work to do. Well, we have done a lot of good work.

In the past 10 years Canada has progressed as a nation and secured a strong future in our ever changing world. Canada's children get a better head start, our national parks system is growing, our books are balanced, our taxes are lower, and millions of jobs have been created, and those are just a few examples.

I know my colleagues will join me in congratulating the Prime Minister on 10 good years of government.

Aboriginal Affairs
Statements By Members

11:10 a.m.

NDP

Dick Proctor Palliser, SK

Mr. Speaker, for 25 years the early childhood intervention program has provided services to families of children from birth to school age who were developmentally delayed or a risk for delay.

Until now, families residing within first nation communities have had equal opportunity to access these services, either through provincial funding off reserve or federal funding on reserve.

Incredibly, as of next March, the on reserve access through the Department of Indian and Northern Affairs will be cut off. Why? Because federal bureaucrats have erroneously concluded that these services duplicate the aboriginal head start programs. They certainly do not, as the professionals who work in this specialized area have attested.

Hundreds of on reserve families in Saskatchewan alone will be negatively impacted as a result of this decision. New Democrats are pleading with Health Canada and the Department of Indian Affairs and Northern Development to relook at this program and the clientele it serves.

It would be readily apparent to them that there is no duplication and that the continuation of these programs is both urgent and imperative.

Small Business Week
Statements By Members

October 24th, 2003 / 11:10 a.m.

Liberal

Sarmite Bulte Parkdale—High Park, ON

Mr. Speaker, I am delighted to rise today to recognize the 2003 small business week, which runs from October 19 to 25. This year's theme is, “You're the power behind the Canadian economy, let's share the energy”.

Small business is the fastest growing business sector in Canada and in this sector women-owned businesses are the fastest growing segment. Based on the 2001 census, the number of women entrepreneurs grew by 208% from 1981 to 2001 compared to a meagre 38% increase for men.

In fact, there are more than 821,000 women entrepreneurs in Canada and their businesses contributed over $18 billion to the Canadian economy in 2001. According to the OECD, Canadian women have the highest participation rate in the world for owning their own businesses.

To focus on this burgeoning increase in women who own businesses, I have been honoured to chair the Prime Minister's task force on women entrepreneurs and I am pleased to inform the House that our report will be released next Wednesday.

Justice
Statements By Members

11:15 a.m.

Canadian Alliance

Brian Pallister Portage—Lisgar, MB

Mr. Speaker, Perry Fontaine comes from a privileged background. He is the former chairman of the Virginia Fontaine Addictions Foundation, and was responsible for the care and treatment of solvent addicted aboriginal children.

Mr. Fontaine is now facing eight charges of bribery and fraud for allegedly funnelling over $600,000 from the addictions foundation and away from those very children. He is accused of stealing from the most vulnerable, the most fragile, and the most deserving of our compassion.

Because Perry Fontaine is aboriginal, he can ask the court for special treatment at sentencing. Liberal amendments to the Criminal Code and the Youth Criminal Justice Act instruct judges to place the rights of aboriginal criminals above the rights of aboriginal victims. That is wrong.

We must end race based sentencing and say yes to the equal rights of aboriginal victims to justice in this country.

Ethics
Oral Question Period

11:15 a.m.

Progressive Conservative

Peter MacKay Pictou—Antigonish—Guysborough, NS

Mr. Speaker, yesterday for the first time the Minister of Industry finally admitted freely that he accepted a free gift by going fishing at the Irving fishing lodge. A forced, half-hearted, eleventh hour apology is simply not good enough.

I ask the Deputy Prime Minister, does he still care about integrity in government? Has he intervened on behalf of Canadians, and when will the Minister of Industry be asked to resign?

Ethics
Oral Question Period

11:15 a.m.

Ottawa South
Ontario

Liberal

John Manley Deputy Prime Minister and Minister of Finance

Mr. Speaker, the minister has answered these allegations fully in the House. He has dealt with each of the issues that have been raised.

There are a couple of outstanding items that have been referred by the minister himself to the ethics counsellor. He will deal with those when the ethics counsellor has completed looking at them.

Ethics
Oral Question Period

11:15 a.m.

Progressive Conservative

Peter MacKay Pictou—Antigonish—Guysborough, NS

Mr. Speaker, the fact remains that the ethics counsellor has not a shred of credibility with Canadians or with members of the opposition certainly and, I suspect, members of the government.

The Minister of Industry since 1993 filed six gift declarations. He had to understand the provisions of the code of ethics. Yet there is a suspicious eight year gap during which he filed nothing.

Why did the Minister of Industry not come forward sooner with this declaration? Why does the Deputy Prime Minister not care about responsible government and ask the Minister of Industry to resign?

Ethics
Oral Question Period

11:15 a.m.

Ottawa South
Ontario

Liberal

John Manley Deputy Prime Minister and Minister of Finance

Mr. Speaker, when it comes to credibility, he is a member who ought to be careful where he treads. He did sign a document not that long ago and then kind of threw it aside.

In respect to the matter that he is raising, it is clear that the minister has dealt with each of the allegations. He has dealt with them in the House. He has dealt with them in public. He has issued an apology for some aspects of his actions. That should leave the matter closed.

Ethics
Oral Question Period

11:15 a.m.

Progressive Conservative

Peter MacKay Pictou—Antigonish—Guysborough, NS

Mr. Speaker, I will take no lectures from a former junior rat packer who while in opposition used to care about responsible government. I will take no lessons from a Deputy Prime Minister who stands in this House day after day and defends the corrupt, sleazy actions on behalf of cabinet ministers that cost Canadian taxpayers hundreds of millions of dollars.

In the absence of leadership from the Prime Minister, when will the Deputy Prime Minister step forward, show some leadership and ask the industry minister to resign?

Ethics
Oral Question Period

11:15 a.m.

Ottawa South
Ontario

Liberal

John Manley Deputy Prime Minister and Minister of Finance

Mr. Speaker, it has been many years, but I recognize the dulcet tones of a rat packer myself in that question.

What we have here is a desperate attempt on the part of the leader of the Progressive Conservative Party to attract some attention to himself. He is a leader who has decided to abandon the history and traditions of his party and turn the brand and its reputation over to the Alliance Party, and who does not have the support of key people in his party, including the previous leader. His desperation shows in his tone of voice.

Ethics
Oral Question Period

11:15 a.m.

Canadian Alliance

Carol Skelton Saskatoon—Rosetown—Biggar, SK

Mr. Speaker, the government continues to throw muck on people.

We do not accept the industry minister's half-hearted apology he gave yesterday. It was too little and it was too late. He was wrong to accept the trip. He was wrong to hide it from the ethics counsellor. He was wrong to lobby for the Irvings.

Will the Deputy Prime Minister do the right thing today and ask the industry minister to resign?