House of Commons Hansard #148 of the 37th Parliament, 2nd Session. (The original version is on Parliament's site.) The word of the day was provinces.

Topics

Royal Winter Fair
Statements By Members

11:05 a.m.

Liberal

Alan Tonks York South—Weston, ON

Mr. Speaker, it is not often that someone can go to downtown Toronto and experience the inside story of agriculture in Canada, but once a year the country comes to the city.

On November 7 the Royal Winter Fair opens in Toronto. A Canadian tradition, the royal is the largest indoor agricultural, horticultural, canine and equestrian event in the world.

Fun for the whole family, the Royal Winter Fair has plenty of shopping, eating and learning opportunities. The royal is a wonderful experience and a chance to teach our kids that food does not just come from the grocery store. It is truly a show like no other, where the country shows the city a thing or two.

There is more information at www.royalfair.org. Everyone should get out and enjoy all that Canadian agriculture has to offer.

Member for LaSalle—Émard
Statements By Members

11:05 a.m.

Bloc

Odina Desrochers Lotbinière—L'Érable, QC

Mr. Speaker, today, hundreds of thousands of young people will go door to door asking for candy from behind their disguises.

Here in the House of Commons, many politicians wear a disguise all year round, but we always manage to recognize them because sooner or later, the truth comes to light.

In recent months, a supernatural phenomenon has been occurring regularly in Canada's Parliament. Is there an invisible man lurking about, or the same way there was a phantom of the opera, are we dealing with a phantom of Parliament?

The person behind this eerie dramatic political phenomenon is none other than the former finance minister, who remains invisible in the House of Commons and continuously haunts the current Prime Minister. The phantom of the opera sings, the phantom of Parliament speaks, but his message is inaudible and, when he sings, he sings off key.

Despite his many faces, Quebec will always see him as the person responsible for all the drastic cuts to EI, health and education.

Let us unmask the member for LaSalle—Émard, right now.

Jordin Tootoo
Statements By Members

11:05 a.m.

Liberal

Marlene Jennings Notre-Dame-de-Grâce—Lachine, QC

Mr. Speaker, on behalf of the House I would like to commend an outstanding young man who has been making some big news in the National Hockey League. I am talking about Jordin Tootoo, the first NHL player of Inuit descent.

Mr. Tootoo grew up in Rankin Inlet, Nunavut. He made his debut in the National Hockey League this past month on the Nashville Predators team.

Hockey fans across Canada and in Nashville are excited about Jordin Tootoo's style and ability. As a junior, he had a record setting season before entering professional hockey. His positive story means that regional and other barriers in our national game are falling. It proves that ability is what counts.

I am sure that all my colleagues in the House will join me in extending our congratulations and best wishes to Jordin Tootoo.

Member for LaSalle--Émard
Statements By Members

11:05 a.m.

Canadian Alliance

Chuck Strahl Fraser Valley, BC

Mr. Speaker, Halloween can be a scary time, especially for the new leader of the Liberal Party. We have discovered the top 10 things that keep the member for LaSalle--Émard awake at night.

Number 10, more spending announcements by the current Prime Minister.

Number 9 , frankly, three more months of anything from the current Prime Minister.

Number 8, just exactly how will he manage a cabinet with 150 members in it?

Number 7, the thought that someone is actually out there keeping track of all of his promises.

Number 6, having to face the music in question period every single day.

Number 5, there is an Auditor General report out there, lurking in the shadows and ready to be tabled on the eve of the election.

Number 4, trying to keep a straight face while talking about democratic reform and the Liberal Party of Canada in the same sentence.

Number 3, the idea that someone will remember his original red book promises.

Number 2, what if there really was an ethics counsellor out there and he had real teeth?

The number 1 reason that the member for LaSalle--Émard cannot sleep this Halloween is that he has to face a united opposition in the next election in the form of the new Conservative Party of Canada.

Unicef
Statements By Members

11:05 a.m.

Liberal

Tony Tirabassi Niagara Centre, ON

Mr. Speaker, I rise in the House today to recognize the fundraising efforts of UNICEF volunteers and workers this Halloween.

The UNICEF on Halloween story began in 1950 when a small Sunday school class in the United States decided to collect coins on Halloween for children in need instead of asking for candy. They sent their cheques totalling $17 to the United Nations Children's Fund. Since then, UNICEF has expanded and so has its fundraising efforts.

In Canada, Halloween represents one of the mainstays of UNICEF Canada's fundraising programs. Last year alone over $3 million was collected by Canadian children for children in developing countries.

I would ask members to join me in congratulating UNICEF Canada for its outstanding efforts to help children in need on this special day. Happy Halloween.

Mervyn “Butch” Blake
Statements By Members

11:10 a.m.

Progressive Conservative

Gary Schellenberger Perth—Middlesex, ON

Mr. Speaker, I rise today to pay tribute to one of Stratford Festival's most loved and longtime members, Mr. Mervyn “Butch” Blake, who passed away recently at the age of 95.

Mr. Blake joined the Stratford Festival in 1957 and remained with the company for 42 consecutive years, during which time he performed in every one of Shakespeare's plays. Butch Blake's talent and commitment to the theatre earned him the respect of his peers, the affection of audiences, and the recognition of his adopted country. He was awarded the Queen's Silver Jubilee Medal in 1978 and was invested as a member of the Order of Canada in 1995.

I know that the Stratford Festival is proud to have counted Butch Blake as a beloved member of its immensely talented family. I am equally proud to say that Mr. Blake lived for many years in my hometown of Sebringville, Ontario.

I am sure all members of the House will join me in expressing our condolences to Mr. Blake's family and the theatre community across Canada.

René Lévesque
Statements By Members

11:10 a.m.

Bloc

Monique Guay Laurentides, QC

Mr. Speaker, tomorrow Quebeckers are honouring the memory of an illustrious citizen who left us on November 1, 1987.

We will remember René Lévesque, the reporter, who saw the horrors of World War II first hand and was one of the first to witness the dreadful sights at the death camps. We will remember the simple and generous man, who tied his own destiny to that of his people.

A staunch defender of power to the people, he left as his legacy a number of progressive laws that are the envy of the world: the political party financing act, the revised elections act, the referendum act, and the access to public documents act are just some of them. A man who always knew how to listen, he was a source of inspiration to us all, and imbued us with an unshakeable confidence in ourselves.

A man of his century, René Lévesque humbly set himself the noble task of building the country of Quebec. That he was a born democrat goes without saying. His life, his commitment and his political action are eloquent testimonials to this. Je me souviens; I will remember him.

Women Politicians
Statements By Members

11:10 a.m.

Liberal

Carolyn Bennett St. Paul's, ON

Mr. Speaker, women have made substantial gains toward equality in many aspects of Canadian society. Even so, women's representation in political life remains unequal. As I am sure my colleagues from all sides of the House will attest, there remain barriers to women entering public life and also once elected. Why is this so and what can be done?

I am proud today to announce to the House that in celebration of Women's History Month, a colloquium on this very subject will be held today hosted by the Law Commission of Canada and the University of Ottawa. It will feature such distinguished participants as former parliamentarian Marion Dewar and activist Rosemary Speirs from Equal Voice. This discussion is just one more way to engage in a much needed dialogue on the possible changes that can make politics more inclusive and remove barriers for women.

I encourage all members of the House to work together in finding new ideas and solutions.

Dwight Bishop
Statements By Members

11:10 a.m.

NDP

Peter Stoffer Sackville—Musquodoboit Valley—Eastern Shore, NS

Mr. Speaker, I rise in the House today to bring the attention of my colleagues in the House of Commons to the upcoming retirement of RCMP assistant commissioner Dwight Bishop.

Mr. Dwight Bishop has served with the RCMP since 1969, serving in the provinces of Manitoba, Ontario and Nova Scotia. He was a uniformed officer in commercial crime, illegal drugs, and customs and excise. He was the officer in charge in Cape Breton. He was a commanding officer of the RCMP in Nova Scotia. He was also the commander in charge of the Swissair disaster, as well as the commander in charge of the 9/11 aftermath.

The quality of this individual and how he treated his fellow officers was reflected in the fact that through 12 major labour disputes, he was able to coordinate each one to negotiated settlement.

On a personal note, this individual was born in Cambridge, Nova Scotia. He has served for 34 years and will be retiring in Wolfville, Nova Scotia. He is a wonderful gentleman and a proud servant to our country. We salute his efforts.

Influenza
Statements By Members

11:10 a.m.

Liberal

Jeannot Castonguay Madawaska—Restigouche, NB

Mr. Speaker, I am pleased to inform the House and all Canadians that October is National Flu Awareness Month.

Every winter, almost one-quarter of Canadians are infected with influenza. Thousands become seriously ill and thousands more die from flu-related complications.

Almost anyone who wants to improve his or her chances of having a flu-free winter can benefit from the annual flu shot. The flu shot cannot give a person the flu and side effects are minor.

Seniors, adults and children with chronic diseases, and their caregivers are most at risk. Without vaccination, they may face the possibility of serious or even fatal consequences should they get the flu. A yearly vaccination is the only preventive measure that has been proven to reduce the mortality rate from influenza.

I encourage all Canadians at risk to protect themselves and others. Flu shots are the best way to do so.

Kamloops, Thompson and Highland Valleys
Statements By Members

11:15 a.m.

Canadian Alliance

Betty Hinton Kamloops, Thompson And Highland Valleys, BC

Mr. Speaker, it is with great pride that I rise today to commend the many helping hands who have come to the aid of the people of Kamloops, Thompson and Highland Valleys.

The North Thompson Relief Fund, headed by George Evans, has raised tremendous amounts of money to bring relief to the people in the valley as have the Red Cross, the Mennonite Disaster Service, and Habitat for Humanity. Last night, the coup de grâce, the All Party Party also raised money for the North Thompson relief and we will be making that presentation on behalf of every party in the House very soon.

On behalf of the people of Kamloops, Thompson and Highland Valleys, it is with great pride that I say thanks to one and all for being so generous of spirit.

Veterans Affairs
Oral Question Period

October 31st, 2003 / 11:15 a.m.

Canadian Alliance

Carol Skelton Saskatoon—Rosetown—Biggar, SK

Mr. Speaker, yesterday, the House unanimously accepted an all party report on VIP benefits. This report asks that benefits be extended to all qualifying war widows.

When will the government act on this recommendation?

Veterans Affairs
Oral Question Period

11:15 a.m.

Oshawa
Ontario

Liberal

Ivan Grose Parliamentary Secretary to the Minister of Veterans Affairs

Mr. Speaker, as has been said before in the House and I pretty well have it memorized, the Department of Veterans Affairs exhausted its budget enabling 10,000 additional widows to receive VIP treatment.

As reported in the press, the Prime Minister has said that he would take a look at this and see what he could do. I am sure that the Prime Minister, with the other important decisions that he has to make in the next while, will do so.

Veterans Affairs
Oral Question Period

11:15 a.m.

Canadian Alliance

Carol Skelton Saskatoon—Rosetown—Biggar, SK

Mr. Speaker, the government has money for VIA Rail but nothing for our war widows. It took cabinet only 24 hours to buy two luxury executive jets, but it leaves our widows hanging.

How much longer will Canada's war widows have to wait?

Veterans Affairs
Oral Question Period

11:15 a.m.

Oshawa
Ontario

Liberal

Ivan Grose Parliamentary Secretary to the Minister of Veterans Affairs

Mr. Speaker, as to the time interval, I cannot answer. It is under study at the moment. I am quite sure that a favourable answer will come somewhere down the pipe.