House of Commons Hansard #68 of the 37th Parliament, 2nd Session. (The original version is on Parliament's site.) The word of the day was fish.

Topics

Kyoto Protocol
Oral Question Period

2:45 p.m.

Victoria
B.C.

Liberal

David Anderson Minister of the Environment

Mr. Speaker, I had very productive phone conversations with the Quebec minister just last night. Of course we will hold meetings with Quebec. As the Prime Minister said himself on November 27, we hope to reach an agreement with the Province of Quebec.

But there is no need for this to be done yesterday or the day before yesterday or today. This is not necessary. No, we have to hold discussions with all the provinces before agreements can be reached with any one province. It is very important to have input from all the provinces before signing any agreements.

Kyoto Protocol
Oral Question Period

2:45 p.m.

Bloc

Bernard Bigras Rosemont—Petite-Patrie, QC

Mr. Speaker, by reducing the requirements for the oil and gas industry and the automobile industry, is the Minister of the Environment not getting ready to increase the greenhouse gas reduction requirements for other industries, especially industries in Quebec that have done more than their share so far?

Kyoto Protocol
Oral Question Period

2:45 p.m.

Victoria
B.C.

Liberal

David Anderson Minister of the Environment

Mr. Speaker, there are several sectors in the Canadian economy; at least 25. Discussions have to be held with all the sectors.

We do not have hundreds of officials who are in possession of all the necessary information. We must speak to everyone in turn. There will be a series of discussions. It is not a question of favouring one or another, by any stretch of the imagination.

Firearms Registry
Oral Question Period

2:45 p.m.

Canadian Alliance

Garry Breitkreuz Yorkton—Melville, SK

Mr. Speaker, today the justice minister is going to come to Parliament and ask for another $170 million for the gun registry. That is unbelievable. Just yesterday for the umpteenth time the justice minister refused to tell us the total cost of the gun registry for all federal departments.

How can he possibly expect any parliamentarian to approve more money when he has no idea as to what the total cost will be? In fact, he cannot even tell us what has been spent so far.

Firearms Registry
Oral Question Period

2:45 p.m.

Outremont
Québec

Liberal

Martin Cauchon Minister of Justice and Attorney General of Canada

Mr. Speaker, the question is interesting knowing that I spent two hours at the beginning of the week at the public accounts committee and I do not remember the hon. member asking the question.

One thing is for sure. If members look at the support that we have had from the Canadian population since the tabling of our plan of action, people know that we are going exactly in the right direction. People know as well that gun control does make a difference in our society. People know that the program has already delivered some very good benefits for the Canadian population.

Firearms Registry
Oral Question Period

2:45 p.m.

Canadian Alliance

Garry Breitkreuz Yorkton—Melville, SK

Mr. Speaker, we now know what the minister means by cash management and running the registry at minimum levels. It has been spending $1 million per day since Parliament pulled the $72 million out of the gun registry budget in December. That is what it is, $1 million per day.

Why does the minister have nothing but contempt for the House and Canadian taxpayers?

Firearms Registry
Oral Question Period

2:50 p.m.

Outremont
Québec

Liberal

Martin Cauchon Minister of Justice and Attorney General of Canada

Mr. Speaker, Canadian taxpayers know exactly that we are doing the right thing for Canadian society.

How could we convince the member of Parliament knowing what he said in a press release back in 1995? I will repeat it. The member said:

Gun controls will not improve public safety, it will put the public at more risk. Gun control will not reduce violent crime, it will increase violence.

He should talk to the victims associations from across Canada and to police associations that are supporting gun control. We are doing what is right for our Canadian society.

Multiculturalism
Oral Question Period

2:50 p.m.

Liberal

John Maloney Erie—Lincoln, ON

Mr. Speaker, the face of Canada is changing. According to the recently released Statistics Canada 2001 census, the total population of visible minorities was almost four million, or 13.4% of the total population. That is an increase from 11.2% in 1996.

Over the years police organizations throughout the country have evolved to meet the needs of our multicultural society. As society continues to become more diverse, police services will be required to respond to our changing demographics.

Could the Secretary of State for Multiculturalism and the Status of Women explain to the House how her department is facilitating this?

Multiculturalism
Oral Question Period

2:50 p.m.

Etobicoke—Lakeshore
Ontario

Liberal

Jean Augustine Secretary of State (Multiculturalism) (Status of Women)

Mr. Speaker, on February 27 and 28 I am hosting a national forum in Ottawa entitled “Policing in a Multicultural Society”.

The forum will involve key federal departments, aboriginal and diverse ethno-racial leaders and communities, and the police. The forum will focus on three major areas: sharing information; building and strengthening partnerships; and showcasing tools and best practices.

Outcomes from the forum will be linked to an upcoming RCMP conference in June 2003.

Health
Oral Question Period

2:50 p.m.

NDP

Svend Robinson Burnaby—Douglas, BC

Mr. Speaker, my question is for the Minister of Health.

There was a recent study by UQAM professors Lauzon and Hasbani of the big nine multinational drug companies. It showed that they had an obscene level of after tax return on investment, 41%, and that they spent three times as much flogging their drugs as they did on research.

I want to ask the minister, will she now, in light of this, withdraw her defence of big pharma and her contemptible attack on patients whom she blamed for taking too many pills? Will she instead accept the Romanow commission recommendation to fully review Canada's patent laws? Will she stand up for the sick and--

Health
Oral Question Period

2:50 p.m.

The Speaker

The hon. Minister of Health.

Health
Oral Question Period

2:50 p.m.

Edmonton West
Alberta

Liberal

Anne McLellan Minister of Health

Mr. Speaker, it is most unfortunate that the hon. member chooses to misconstrue and misrepresent the comments that I made, but he does raise a serious point. That is in relation to both the cost and utilization of drugs in the Canadian health care system.

If the hon. member had taken the time to read the recent health accord, he would have seen that the first ministers have instructed their health ministers to take up both issues, the overall cost of drugs in our health care system and also the equally important issue of utilization, how drugs are used and are we getting better health outcomes for all Canadians in the use of those drugs.

Infrastructure
Oral Question Period

February 26th, 2003 / 2:50 p.m.

NDP

Brian Masse Windsor West, ON

Mr. Speaker, last week the Minister of Finance stiffed municipalities by leaving them out of his budget. We warned at that time that new taxes and user fees would be introduced. Yesterday the Minister of Transport introduced a plan with no new funds and today he is calling toll roads an innovation.

My question is for the Minister of Finance. Is this the best Canadians can expect? Is this the innovation we are going to see save our cities?

Infrastructure
Oral Question Period

2:50 p.m.

Vaughan—King—Aurora
Ontario

Liberal

Maurizio Bevilacqua Secretary of State (International Financial Institutions)

Mr. Speaker, I remember back in 1993 when we inherited a $42 billion deficit. The first thing we did was to introduce a $2 billion infrastructure program that generated $6 billion worth of infrastructure. Since then we have introduced $8 billion worth of infrastructure program. That adds up to $14 billion, if I am correct. That is hardly stiffing the municipalities.

Softwood Lumber
Oral Question Period

2:50 p.m.

Progressive Conservative

Bill Casey Cumberland—Colchester, NS

Mr. Speaker, in December the Minister for International Trade announced an outright grant of $15 million to the Canadian Lumber Trade Alliance.

I would like to ask the minister, has the cheque gone out yet for the $15 million? Exactly what accountability is required for the $15 million? Will Parliament have access to the accounting of exactly where every single dollar went?