House of Commons Hansard #73 of the 37th Parliament, 2nd Session. (The original version is on Parliament's site.) The word of the day was transportation.

Topics

Petitions
Routine Proceedings

3:25 p.m.

NDP

Alexa McDonough Halifax, NS

Mr. Speaker, I would like to table a petition which says no to war in Iraq. It bears the signatures of hundreds of Canadians to be added to the thousands who have already signed similar petitions that have been previously tabled.

One of the provisions of the petition is the call for the Canadian Parliament to reject U.S. proposals to have Canada participate in any way in an illegal war. A lot of Canadians remain concerned that although the government has said it is not prepared to participate, there are 31 military officers actively engaged in the Middle East with the U.K. and U.S. military. We have many ships in the gulf area. We want to be certain that Parliament speaks clearly with one voice to say that Canada will not be participating in any active military engagement in the Middle East.

Petitions
Routine Proceedings

3:25 p.m.

Canadian Alliance

Dale Johnston Wetaskiwin, AB

Mr. Speaker, I am presenting two petitions today.

The first petition is signed by a group of my constituents who support ethical stem cell research. They support research for such diseases as Parkinson's, Alzheimer's, diabetes, cancer, muscular dystrophy, spinal cord injury and so forth. Therefore, the petitioners call upon Parliament to focus its legislative support on adult stem cell research to find cures for the foregoing illnesses and therapies.

Petitions
Routine Proceedings

3:25 p.m.

Canadian Alliance

Dale Johnston Wetaskiwin, AB

Mr. Speaker, the second petition is signed by a number of my constituents. They call upon Parliament to protect our children by taking all necessary steps to ensure that all materials which promote or glorify pedophilia or sado-masochistic activities be outlawed.

Petitions
Routine Proceedings

3:25 p.m.

Canadian Alliance

Garry Breitkreuz Yorkton—Melville, SK

Mr. Speaker, I have the honour of presenting a petition today on child pornography. It is signed by many constituents in my riding and many of them are first nations people living on reserves.

The petitioners call the attention of the House to the fact that the creation and use of child pornography is condemned by a clear majority of Canadians, and that the courts have not applied the current pornography law in a way that makes in clear that such exploitation of children will be met with swift punishment.

They call upon Parliament to protect our children by taking all necessary steps to ensure that all materials which promote or glorify pedophilia or sado-masochistic activities involving children are outlawed.

Petitions
Routine Proceedings

3:25 p.m.

Liberal

Paul Bonwick Simcoe—Grey, ON

Mr. Speaker, I rise on a point of order. I wonder if I could seek unanimous support within the House to take my bill directly to second reading and in turn refer it to committee at the next available sitting day for committee.

Petitions
Routine Proceedings

3:25 p.m.

The Speaker

Is there unanimous consent?

Petitions
Routine Proceedings

3:25 p.m.

Some hon. members

Agreed.

Petitions
Routine Proceedings

3:25 p.m.

Some hon. members

No.

Questions on the Order Paper
Routine Proceedings

3:25 p.m.

Halifax West
Nova Scotia

Liberal

Geoff Regan Parliamentary Secretary to the Leader of the Government in the House of Commons

Mr. Speaker, the following questions will be answered today: Nos. 119, 151 and 166.

Question No. 119
Routine Proceedings

3:25 p.m.

Progressive Conservative

Rick Borotsik Brandon—Souris, MB

Can the Minister responsible for Agriculture and Agri-Food provide an estimate of the increase in crop insurance premiums for next year in the provinces of Alberta, Saskatchewan, and Manitoba?

Question No. 119
Routine Proceedings

3:25 p.m.

Prince Edward—Hastings
Ontario

Liberal

Lyle Vanclief Minister of Agriculture and Agri-Food

Governments are currently in the process of finalizing all elements of the agricultural policy framework. This framework will guide the development of all aspects of government support for the agricultural sector over the next five years. The APF covers not only business risk management, but provides for protecting the environment, increasing our innovation and science efforts and better equipping farmers under the renewal element in a single, solid platform that will help Canadian agriculture maximize new opportunities at home and in the world market.

The crop insurance program will be an essential component of the APF. Its importance has been demonstrated once again with its quick payment of record levels of payouts in recent years. The APF will maintain successful elements of the current crop insurance program as well as offer additional flexibility and funding to expand and enhance the program. Specifically, full implementation of the APF will: encourage greater participation through the development of a broader range of program options and benefits; offer all farmers access to the maximum coverage level, 90%; provide farmers across Canada with the same level of federal premium support; target the greatest level of government support to severe production loss situations; and increase the federal government’s share of support from about 50% to 60% of the total government contributions.

Most provinces have or are about to announce their 2003 crop insurance program changes and therefore the projected premium costs for 2003 are becoming more clear.

Premium costs in Alberta, Saskatchewan and Manitoba will all be increasing for 2003. The amount and reason for the cost increases vary by province, however, all three provincial governments and the federal government have agreed that the producers’ share of total premium costs will not change for 2003.

Each year the provinces determine crop insurance premium rates based on actuarial formula. The 2003 premium rates will be increasing because of higher coverage due to the updated yields, recent large losses and the resulting change in a province’s cumulative financial position. Despite these increases, premium rates are still significantly lower than the levels throughout much of the 1990s. Governments are also contributing more, 60%, toward premiums in the current year compared to about 50% a decade ago. When good crops are produced, producer’s average premium decrease; in years where more losses occurred, the average premium increase to ensure the sustainability of the crop insurance program.

In addition, the total premium costs will also be increasing due to rising participation levels resulting from program enhancements to existing programs and the introduction of new programs. Both Alberta and Saskatchewan will be introducing new and expanding existing programs for 2003. Alberta’s premium cost estimates reflect participation increases of as much as 30% to 40% over the record levels obtained in 2002, for their forage and pasture programs.

Higher insurable prices in 2003 compared to the values used for 2002 will also factor in increased premium costs. As a result of these higher insured prices, producers will have more protection in the event of a crop loss. This higher level of protection means that farmers and governments will pay more premiums but producers have the option of selecting lower price levels to help keep premium costs affordable.

Based on the factors discussed above, the latest 2003 premium estimates for the Prairie provinces and a Canadian total are compared with 2002 values in the attached table.

Total Crop Insurance Premiums ($ millions)

Question No. 151
Routine Proceedings

March 19th, 2003 / 3:25 p.m.

Canadian Alliance

Jim Abbott Kootenay—Columbia, BC

For each year from 1993 to 2002, what was the total amount billed to the Department of Canadian Heritage and its Crown corporations and agencies by the Capital Hill Group?

Question No. 151
Routine Proceedings

3:25 p.m.

Hamilton East
Ontario

Liberal

Sheila Copps Minister of Canadian Heritage

Department of Canadian Heritage:

Nil.

Canada Council for the Arts:

The Canada Council for the Arts has made no payments to the Capital Hill Group for the period indicated.

Canadian Broadcasting Corporation, CBC:

The CBC indicates that agreements with service suppliers are confidential.

Canadian Cultural Property Export Review Board:

N/A. Capital Hill Group has not billed the Canadian Cultural Property Export Review Board between 1993 to 2002.

Canadian Film Development Corporation, (Telefilm):

Total amount billed by Capital Hill Group:

1993-94, $0.00;

1994-95, $0.00;

1995-96, $0.00;

1996-97, $0.00;

1997-98, $0.00;

1998-99, $0.00;

1999-2000, $0.00;

2000-01, $403.20;

2001-02, $900.48

Canadian Museum of Civilization:

The Canadian Museum of Civilization has had no billings from the Capital Hill Group for the period indicated.

Canadian Museum of Nature:

During fiscal years 1993-94 to 2001-02, the Canadian Museum of Nature, CMN, has had no dealings with the Capital Hill Group. Therefore, no amount was billed to us.

Canadian Radio-Television & Telecommunications Commission (CRTC):

For the period 1995-96 to 2001-02, the CRTC did not make any payment to the Capital Hill Group. Information for prior fiscal years is not available as financial records are kept for only seven years, in accordance with the “Retention Guidelines for Common Administrative Records of the Government of Canada”.

National Archives of Canada:

A review of our contracts and accounts payable files reveals that no payments were made by the National Archives of Canada to Capital Hill Group for the period 1993 to 2002, fiscal years 1993-94 to 2001-02. Additionally, financial data is only available going back to 1996-97, all previous records having been disposed in accordance with records disposition schedules.

National Arts Centre Corporation:

The National Arts Centre did not make any payment to the Capital Hill Group for any of the years requested.

National Battlefields Commission:

During fiscal years 1993-94 to 2001-02, the National Battlefields Commission, NBC, has had no dealings with the Capital Hill Group. Therefore, no amount was billed to us.

National Capital Commission:

Our records show that the NCC has not had any amounts billed from the company mentioned in the question.

National Film Board:

There were no transactions between the National Film Board and the Capital Hill Group for any of the years requested.

National Gallery of Canada:

The National Gallery of Canada has had no dealings with the Capital Hill Group.

National Library:

A review of our contracts and accounts payable files reveals that no payments were made by the National Library of Canada to Capital Hill Group for the period 1993 to 2002, fiscal years 1993-94 to 2001-02. Additionally, financial data is only available going back to 1996-97, all previous records having been disposed in accordance with records disposition schedules.

National Museum of Science and Technology Corporation:

The Canada Museum of Science and Technology Corporation has not been invoiced from the Capital Hill Group from 1993-94 to 2001-02.

Parks Canada Agency:

From April 1, 1993 to December 31, 2002, the Capital Hill Group billed the following amount to the Parks Canada Agency: Nil.

Public Service Commission:

The Public Service Commission has not been invoiced from the Capital Hill Group from 1994-95 to 2001-02. The Public Service Commission cannot extract the information for the year 1993-94, as it is no longer in our archives.

Question No. 166
Routine Proceedings

3:25 p.m.

Canadian Alliance

Scott Reid Lanark—Carleton, ON

With regard to the language of menus and other services to the public at restaurants located at premises that are rented from the National Capital Commission in the ByWard Market and other locations: ( a ) since what date have standard leases required that restaurateurs and other service providers provide services to the public in both official languages; ( b ) which types of services are covered by the requirement to provide services in both official languages and at which locations; ( c ) are there any service providers who are not covered by such a provision in their leases and, if so, at what locations are these service providers located; and ( d ) what means, if any, have been used to enforce this leasehold condition with regard to the specific leases where it does apply?

Question No. 166
Routine Proceedings

3:25 p.m.

Hamilton East
Ontario

Liberal

Sheila Copps Minister of Canadian Heritage

National Capital Commission:

(a) The NCC commercial tenants are not considered “service providers” on behalf of the NCC, but rather are private commercial businesses that lease space in NCC owned property. NCC leases dated as early as 1974 include a clause relating to official languages.

(b) NCC leases stipulate that tenants shall maintain on the leased premises an adequate staff of employees to provide service to the public in both official languages of Canada. Leases also stipulate that all signs, menus, and promotional material shall be in both official languages of Canada, and that signage of the lessee affixed to the exterior of the leased premises and any window signage visible to the passing public, must be in both official languages of Canada. These requirements are typically associated with commercial establishments on NCC owned property.

(c) Some of the leases were assumed by the NCC as the result of property acquisition or by the transfer of ownership and do not include the requirement regarding the provision of services in both official languages. However, such provisions will be added to the rental terms as these leases are renewed. Such properties include: 96-100 Sparks, Tim Horton’s restaurant, office space and retail; 30 Metcalfe, Hong Kong Bank and offices; 123 Queen Street, Oscar’s restaurant; 134 Sparks, Shawarma restaurant, all in Ottawa; and 101 rue Montcalm, Lotus Thai restaurant, in Gatineau, Quebec.

(d) The NCC has taken a collaborative approach to obtain compliance by appealing to the lessees' business sense to obtain their co-operation when a deficiency is reported through a complaint or otherwise. In order to enforce the conditions regarding the provision of services in both official languages, the NCC or its agents inspect leased premises to monitor progress, contact tenants by telephone and send letters requesting compliance to the terms of the lease.