House of Commons Hansard #80 of the 37th Parliament, 2nd Session. (The original version is on Parliament's site.) The word of the day was money.

Topics

Budget Implementation Act, 2003
Government Orders

10:55 a.m.

NDP

Pat Martin Winnipeg Centre, MB

Mr. Speaker, I enjoyed the speech made by the hon. member for St. John's West. He raised many good points. I would like to get his view on a point I raised earlier.

I wonder if he would agree with me that it was an oversight or an omission and the Minister of Finance could have done a very simple administrative thing. In order to provide some relief to the thousands of Canadians who are suffering under the spiralling out of control home heating costs, he could have staggered the months during which EI and Canada pension plan contributions are made so that they would begin to be collected on April 1. Everyone knows full well that many people make contributions for approximately eight months until they have reached their maximum contribution.

If that simple administrative change could be made, would it not provide some relief to families? Would the member join me in urging the government to do so?

Budget Implementation Act, 2003
Government Orders

10:55 a.m.

Progressive Conservative

Loyola Hearn St. John's West, NL

Mr. Speaker, I agree with the member and certainly have absolutely no problem asking the government to do that. It is only a matter of adjusting when it takes out the necessary funds or the percentage of CPP or EI benefits. There is always a three or four month break. Why not give it to people when it is really needed, especially to people on low or fixed incomes?

Let me go a bit further. I am sure that by looking at government programs such as those and by readjusting them, we could find many ways to help people across the country, especially people on low and fixed incomes.

One of the other reasons people suffer with the high costs for fuel is because of government taxes. There should be a ceiling. The government should not be able to rake in windfalls because the price of home heating fuel and gas goes up. There should be a limit which would give the government the same amount of money, but would also give a break to the people who need it.

Canadian Red Cross Society
Statements By Members

10:55 a.m.

Liberal

Mac Harb Ottawa Centre, ON

Mr. Speaker, I am pleased to inform the House and all Canadians that March is Red Cross Month in Canada.

The Canadian Red Cross Society is a volunteer based humanitarian organization dedicated to preventing human suffering across Canada and around the world.

When disaster strikes, it is the quick response of the Red Cross that lessens the hardship suffered by survivors. In Canada alone there are approximately 65,000 Red Cross volunteers who provide for people's basic needs following a disaster, including food, clothing, shelter and first aid.

I want to take this opportunity to recognize this organization and urge all members to support the Canadian Red Cross Society. I urge all Canadians to volunteer their time and to financially support the Red Cross programs.

Gasoline Prices
Statements By Members

10:55 a.m.

Canadian Alliance

Garry Breitkreuz Yorkton—Melville, SK

Mr. Speaker, I met with more than 800 people from my constituency in the first week of March. The most common complaint I heard was that the price of fuel and natural gas was too high.

Farmers trying to keep their vehicles and machinery running are especially hard hit. The price of natural gas is driving up the cost of fertilizer making it even more difficult for those struggling in the agricultural sector. High fuel prices, driven even higher by taxes, are nothing short of highway robbery.

Every year Canadians pay $4.8 billion in fuel taxes but instead of most of that money being put back into roads, it goes straight into general revenues. The Liberal government siphons $375 million in fuel taxes out of Saskatchewan each year, but since 1992 only a total of $26 million has come back. The sudden announcement that $39 million will be spent on roads in Saskatchewan this year is an obvious attempt to buy votes.

Why is the government robbing struggling farmers to fund corporate welfare?

Ontario Egg Producers
Statements By Members

11 a.m.

Liberal

Gurbax Malhi Bramalea—Gore—Malton—Springdale, ON

Mr. Speaker, I would like to recognize the Ontario Egg Producers and its many members who represent a $300 million a year industry in the province of Ontario alone. What they do is provide consumers with guaranteed safe, high quality eggs. This organization also contributes to the efficient management in the production of eggs, research and promotion.

Yesterday in Ottawa the Ontario Egg Producers hosted its annual “Get Cracking” omelette breakfast. The directors of the organization prepared a nutritious, healthy breakfast for many of us on Parliament Hill.

I would especially like to thank Hubert Schillings and Victor Slobodian for their hospitality.

Women, Peace and Security
Statements By Members

March 28th, 2003 / 11 a.m.

Liberal

Carolyn Bennett St. Paul's, ON

Mr. Speaker, on Monday, Linden School, a primary and secondary girls school located in my riding, will be celebrating its 10th anniversary by encouraging students and members of the community to consider the importance of hearing women's voices in the search for peace.

The event is titled “Coalition for Peace: Women Take Action” and will address how to include women's voices at the peace tables worldwide.

They have assembled a distinguished and experienced panel, including Toronto journalist and author Sally Armstrong, Toronto Star columnist Michele Landsberg, political commentator Judy Rebick and Linden alumnus Sarah Shteir.

It will be my pleasure to take part in this event to share the excellent work that our government has done toward the implementation of UN resolution 1325 on women, peace and security.

It is my hope that future generations can continue the important work of ensuring that the views and voices of women are taken into account in the fight for peace.

Aboriginal Achievement Awards
Statements By Members

11 a.m.

Liberal

Nancy Karetak-Lindell Nunavut, NU

Mr. Speaker, tonight in Ottawa 14 individuals chosen by a national jury of accomplished aboriginal people will be honoured at the 10th annual National Aboriginal Achievement Awards in a special televised gala ceremony.

These awards which are the initiative of aboriginal peoples, go to outstanding Inuit, first nations and Métis.

One of the awards is a special youth award and is accompanied by a $10,000 scholarship. Another is in recognition of a lifetime of achievement.

Established in 1993 in conjunction with the United Nations International Decade of the World's Indigenous Peoples, these awards provide role models for aboriginal youth and inform the public of the significant achievement of aboriginal peoples in a wide variety of areas.

Please join me in congratulating the recipients of this year's aboriginal achievement awards.

Government Policies
Statements By Members

11 a.m.

Canadian Alliance

Cheryl Gallant Renfrew—Nipissing—Pembroke, ON

Mr. Speaker, residents of the city of Pembroke woke up this week to a boil water advisory over possible contamination in the municipal water supply. Thanks to the decisive action of Mayor Bob Pilot and county health officials, a potential crisis has been averted, though the advisory remains in effect.

It is clear that years of federal cuts to provincial transfer payments have taken their toll on all Canadians. From the tragic deaths of Canadian Forces pilots flying 40-year-old helicopters, to the tragic deaths of school children near Owen Sound, Ontario because the Liberals cut the funds for safety inspectors, to the sad tragedy of dirty water in Ontario that led to loss of life, the policies of the federal government are literally killing Canadians.

The legacy of the Prime Minister and the former minister of finance has been a continual erosion of Canadian values. How many more Canadians must die thanks to the failed policies of a government that can spend $1 billion chasing duck hunters but refuses to protect children?

Kidney Disease
Statements By Members

11 a.m.

Liberal

Bryon Wilfert Oak Ridges, ON

Mr. Speaker, this is National Kidney Month.

Kidney disease is a serious public health concern in Canada and costs the lives of more than 3,000 Canadians each year. Kidney disease has a significant effect on the quality of life of those affected. More than 22,000 Canadians rely on dialysis to survive. There is no cure.

As the Canadian population ages, the number of people who will be affected by kidney disease is expected to rise. Kidney failure primarily affects the elderly and people with diabetes and heart disease.

Over the last decade medical research has increased the success rate of kidney transplant operations to over 85%. Through research we hope to one day prevent some forms of kidney disease and develop more effective treatment options for others.

I hope that kidney month will draw attention to important concerns related to kidney disease. Please join me in lending support to the Kidney Foundation of Canada during National Kidney Month.

Marie-Josée Aubé
Statements By Members

11:05 a.m.

Bloc

Monique Guay Laurentides, QC

Mr. Speaker, I am proud to pay tribute to a member of my riding of Laurentides, Marie-Josée Aubé, who has written a new chapter for women with a passion for cars.

Six years ago, she and an associate acquired the Laurentides Ford dealership located in Saint-Jérôme. What makes her stand out is that she is one of a very few women car dealers. In fact, out of 851 members, there are only 43 women.

Ms. Aubé's passion for cars did not come about overnight. As a young girl, she spent much of her time playing with her Fisher Price garage. She was constantly organizing parking lots and moving her little cars around. Later she set herself the goal of owning a car dealership by the time she was 30.

She achieved that goal and now she is striving to become an exemplary dealer who will be known for quality. Congratulations Marie-Josée Aubé. Your determination does businesspeople and the women of Laurentides proud.

Canadian Sport Awards
Statements By Members

11:05 a.m.

Liberal

Rodger Cuzner Bras D'Or—Cape Breton, NS

Mr. Speaker, it gives me great pleasure to rise in the House today to congratulate all the winners and nominees of the 30th Annual Canadian Sport Awards which were held this week at CBC headquarters in Toronto.

Catriona Le May Doan, Olympic gold medallist in speed skating, and Roland Green, Commonwealth champion in mountain biking, were once again crowned Canada's top female and male athletes of the year, respectively.The junior athlete of the year title was captured by Alexandre Despatie in diving, and Jennifer Spalding in sailing. Jamie Sale and David Pelletier were named the best pair of the year.

Many other great athletes, coaches and volunteers were recognized and nominated for other awards for their outstanding accomplishment and dedication to sport.

The Canadian Sport Awards were hosted by Ron MacLean and were televised last night on CBC.

I am sure all members will join with me in congratulating all the winners and nominees for their contribution to sport and in thanking them for bringing so much honour to our country.

Canada-U.S. Relations
Statements By Members

11:05 a.m.

Canadian Alliance

Diane Ablonczy Calgary—Nose Hill, AB

Mr. Speaker, the members of the immigration committee of the House have just returned from Washington, D.C. We spent the week in meetings on security and border issues affecting our two countries.

Our U.S. counterparts respect Canada's right to take a different path if we so choose, but they are resolved to preserve the freedoms and homeland security that came under attack on 9/11.

While we were holding talks in the U.S. to constructively address issues of mutual concern, Liberals here continued their pattern of cheap insults and distasteful personal attacks on our traditional ally. The government shames us all by parading its immaturity and lack of class before the world.

MPs from all parties as well as Canadians across the country want to ensure that two independent neighbours continue relations of openness and mutual respect. Sadly, the government has become part of the problem, leaving it to others to work in the spirit of friendship and tolerance which is so much a part of Canadian values.

Canada Winter Games
Statements By Members

11:05 a.m.

Liberal

Dominic LeBlanc Beauséjour—Petitcodiac, NB

Mr. Speaker, I rise today to pay tribute to the 2003 Canada Winter Games Host Society and the more than 7,000 volunteers who successfully hosted the Canada Winter Games in Bathurst and Campbellton, New Brunswick.

Thanks to their dedication and effort more than 2,800 athletes representing all 13 provinces and territories were provided with optimal conditions to enable them to perform at their personal best.

Many of these athletes will go on to represent Canada on national teams, while others will continue in sport as coaches, officials or administrators.

I would like to congratulate Team Quebec for winning the Canada Games Flag and the Centennial Cup.

As well, I wish to congratulate the team from Prince Edward Island which won the Jack Pelech Award and the team from Nova Scotia which won the Claude Hardy Award.

I would like to pay tribute to the thousands of coaches, officials, event organizers and volunteers from northern New Brunswick who did a terrific job.

Species at Risk Act
Statements By Members

11:05 a.m.

NDP

Yvon Godin Acadie—Bathurst, NB

Mr. Speaker, it is bad enough that the Liberals waited three terms to bring in a law for species at risk, but now some Liberal MPs want to weaken Bill C-10, a bill to update a law first written in 1892.

Yes, they want to make laws protecting animals from cruelty weaker than the 111 year old law Canada currently has. Under proposed changes, someone in Leamington, Ontario, who had not fed 300 pigs for months could not be charged with cruelty animals.

It is time the bill that the House passed became law, and time the Liberals said enough is enough.

It is also time the other place stopped splitting bills coming from the House. Unelected and unaccountable bodies have no right at all to split bills from the House, making the Senate even more outdated than Canada's animal cruelty laws.

Lawrence Adams
Statements By Members

11:10 a.m.

Liberal

Carole-Marie Allard Laval East, QC

Mr. Speaker, it is with sadness that I announce the passing of Lawrence Adams, a former principal at the National Ballet of Canada, publisher and passionate champion of dance and dancers.

Lawrence Adams danced for the National Ballet of Canada and the Grands Ballets canadiens de Montréal. Admired for his vibrant personality and talent, he built his reputation on interpreting several classical roles.

He was on the board of directors of the Dance of Canada Association. He and his wife, Miriam Weinstein, established Dance Collection Danse, a not for profit publishing house dedicated to conserving dance heritage.

Canada has lost a generous man who contributed greatly to the advancement and preservation of dance in Canada.

We offer our condolences to his family.