House of Commons Hansard #123 of the 37th Parliament, 2nd Session. (The original version is on Parliament's site.) The word of the day was acadian.

Topics

Government Contracts
Oral Question Period

11:25 a.m.

Progressive Conservative

Loyola Hearn St. John's West, NL

Mr. Speaker, government officials have confirmed the public works department's fraud investigations unit was involved in probing the circumstances surrounding the Liberals' cruise for contracts policy and the $1.4 billion relocation contract for Royal LePage.

The Solicitor General has admitted the RCMP has been called in to investigate. Will he now table the internal audit which led to the investigation and can he tell us if there are other departments involved in this $1.4 billion scandal?

Government Contracts
Oral Question Period

11:25 a.m.

York West
Ontario

Liberal

Judy Sgro Parliamentary Secretary to the Minister of Public Works and Government Services

Mr. Speaker, we are not aware of any RCMP investigation in this file. Issues were raised and the minister and the department have retendered the contract.

Government Contracts
Oral Question Period

11:25 a.m.

Progressive Conservative

Loyola Hearn St. John's West, NL

Mr. Speaker, this investigation goes beyond what government is willing to admit.

Will the minister confirm that eight other members of the evaluation committee, representatives from the Department of National Defence, Treasury Board and the RCMP, attended various Royal LePage sponsored golf tournaments at no cost to themselves?

Has the RCMP investigation branched out to include other government departments?

Will public works re-evaluate the way contracts are tendered to ensure this practice is discontinued?

Government Contracts
Oral Question Period

11:25 a.m.

York West
Ontario

Liberal

Judy Sgro Parliamentary Secretary to the Minister of Public Works and Government Services

Mr. Speaker, as I indicated previously, we are not aware of any RCMP investigation into this particular contract. Issues were raised to the minister and he felt it was better to turn around and retender this contract.

Infrastructure
Oral Question Period

September 19th, 2003 / 11:25 a.m.

NDP

Bill Blaikie Winnipeg—Transcona, MB

Mr. Speaker, yesterday the future prime minister outlined an exceptionally conservative economic agenda. In fact it hardly seems necessary to unite the right. Why re-invent the wheel when we are going to have a government led by the hon. member for LaSalle—Émard?

My question actually is for the Minister of Transport, also the minister responsible for Toronto. I wonder if he could explain to us why the member for LaSalle—Émard ignored cities completely in his economic speech yesterday.

Infrastructure
Oral Question Period

11:25 a.m.

Don Valley East
Ontario

Liberal

David Collenette Minister of Transport

Mr. Speaker, it has been the government's policy to invest rather heavily in urban infrastructure over the last number of years. My colleague, the member for Etobicoke Centre, also from Toronto, is leading the effort with Infrastructure Canada. I think we have done a very commendable job.

The Prime Minister reiterated his commitment in a speech given earlier this week. I have no doubt that this commitment to the urban agenda will continue once we have a new Liberal leader.

Transportation
Oral Question Period

11:25 a.m.

NDP

Bill Blaikie Winnipeg—Transcona, MB

Mr. Speaker, the member for LaSalle—Émard is also associated with a certain kind of continentalism. In that same context, I wonder if the Minister of Transport is aware of this internal memo within the Canadian National Railway which now prohibits employees from using any language that has the word Canadian in it. They can say CN, but they cannot say Canadian National. They cannot say Canadian National Railway. They cannot say Canadian National Railroad.

I wonder if the Minister of Transport would undertake to look into this and communicate to CN, or to the Canadian National Railway, that using the word Canadian--

Transportation
Oral Question Period

11:25 a.m.

The Deputy Speaker

The hon. Minister of Transport.

Transportation
Oral Question Period

11:25 a.m.

Don Valley East
Ontario

Liberal

David Collenette Minister of Transport

Mr. Speaker, I am unaware of the contents of this e-mail, but I have such great respect for my colleague from the NDP, having been in the House with him for many years, that I assume what he says is accurate.

If that is the case, it is not only totally unacceptable, it is obscene, and I will go directly to the chair and the president of Canadian National Railway. This is a great Canadian institution, one of the best railways in North America, and we should not apologize for being Canadian.

Citizenship and Immigration
Oral Question Period

11:30 a.m.

Canadian Alliance

Diane Ablonczy Calgary—Nose Hill, AB

Mr. Speaker, there is no end to Liberal waste of money taxed from struggling Canadian families. From the billion dollar HRDC boondoggle to fake advertising contracts to lavish expense accounts, Liberals keep pouring our money down the drain.

The latest boondoggle is a biometric scan of all Canadians to force everyone to carry a national ID card.

The privacy commissioner says it will cost $5 billion just to kick-start the registry. Why does the government not use the $5 billion to keep foreign criminals from coming into Canada?

Citizenship and Immigration
Oral Question Period

11:30 a.m.

Bourassa
Québec

Liberal

Denis Coderre Minister of Citizenship and Immigration

Mr. Speaker, I think it is completely unacceptable to say such things today. While the Privacy Commissioner mentioned $5 billion, first, there have been no cost studies on the possible use of this kind of document.

The important thing is that Canadians have the right to debate where society is heading. We have decided to have an open debate. The planet is shrinking; other countries are doing this and it is important to find a typically Canadian solution. Therefore, whether we have ID cards or not, there must be a debate.

Citizenship and Immigration
Oral Question Period

11:30 a.m.

Canadian Alliance

Diane Ablonczy Calgary—Nose Hill, AB

Mr. Speaker, every day the Liberals let people without proper documents, or even with no documents at all, simply walk into Canada. The Auditor General says the Liberals have allowed thousands and thousands to stay illegally in this country. The minister actually refused to cooperate with police to make sure 59 known foreign criminals could be removed.

The government says it does not have money for better screening or better removals. So why does it suddenly have $5 billion for a new national ID card registry?

Citizenship and Immigration
Oral Question Period

11:30 a.m.

Bourassa
Québec

Liberal

Denis Coderre Minister of Citizenship and Immigration

Mr. Speaker, first of all I think it is pretty accurate to say that on this side of the House we decided to have a real debate. We feel that because of what is going on all over the country it is great to have that kind of debate. I truly believe that Canadians should have that kind of debate.

We have not talked about any cuts right now and with regard to what the member mentioned about security, security is our number one priority. We have said since the beginning that everything we have to do we are doing. If the member does not agree with it, that is her problem.

Taxation
Oral Question Period

11:30 a.m.

Bloc

Yvan Loubier Saint-Hyacinthe—Bagot, QC

Mr. Speaker, the aspiring prime minister and hon. member for LaSalle—Émard identified education and municipalities among his future priorities, two areas under the jurisdiction of Quebec and the provinces. Instead of seeking to infringe upon other jurisdictions, the father of fiscal imbalance would be better off cleaning up his own mess.

If the government recognizes that education and municipal affairs are priorities, should it not then transfer to Quebec and the provinces the funds it cut from them, so they can meet their own obligations?

Taxation
Oral Question Period

11:30 a.m.

Don Valley East
Ontario

Liberal

David Collenette Minister of Transport

Mr. Speaker, as I said a few moments ago, the infrastructure program of the federal government has done a remarkable job in building Canadian cities. We can invest in cities without intruding on provincial jurisdiction and I think this is something that will be followed as time goes on.