House of Commons Hansard #18 of the 38th Parliament, 1st Session. (The original version is on Parliament's site.) The word of the day was agreements.

Topics

Natural Resources
Oral Question Period

11:45 a.m.

Wascana
Saskatchewan

Liberal

Ralph Goodale Minister of Finance

Mr. Speaker, first, I am very pleased to report to the hon. gentleman that because of the elimination of the clawback in fiscal 2004-05, which will provide a benefit to Saskatchewan of some $590 million, anything that was owed from a previous time has already been returned, as the province of Saskatchewan has acknowledged.

Indeed, Saskatchewan is on the cusp of becoming a have province within Confederation, and we are very proud of that in Saskatchewan.

Agriculture
Oral Question Period

11:45 a.m.

Conservative

James Bezan Selkirk—Interlake, MB

Mr. Speaker, the ruminant livestock industry is in trouble and it continues to suffer due to BSE border closures. Over 100,000 ruminant producers need help now.

It is unbelievable that the government does not hesitate to insult our U.S. neighbours, but it lacks the backbone to negotiate with the U.S. government. The government has no plans to convince the Americans that the border has to be reopened to live animals right now and not later.

Will the government take a firm stand with the American government and proceed with legal action against the United States under NAFTA or WTO?

Agriculture
Oral Question Period

11:45 a.m.

Parry Sound—Muskoka
Ontario

Liberal

Andy Mitchell Minister of Agriculture and Agri-Food

Mr. Speaker, it would probably come as a bit of a surprise to the U.S. ambassador whom I met yesterday that Canada is not advocating on a continual basis for the border to be opened. I think the point was made very clear to him.

In addition to that, as announced on September 10, the government felt it was absolutely essential that we develop made in Canada solutions so our producers could take into their own hands the types of business decisions that they needed to take.

All aspects of that program that were announced on September 10 are now in operation. We are working with the industry to ensure they can achieve profitability.

Textile and Clothing Industry
Oral Question Period

11:45 a.m.

Conservative

Gord Brown Leeds—Grenville, ON

Mr. Speaker, my question is for the Minister of Finance.

The Canadian apparel industry faces challenges due to globalization. The fourth report of the Standing Committee on Finance in the 37th Parliament made three unanimous recommendations. One was to extend the remission orders related to the apparel sector that would expire on December 31 of this year.

Without these in place, jobs will be lost including in my riding of Leeds--Grenville. When will the finance minister extend these remissions orders?

Textile and Clothing Industry
Oral Question Period

11:45 a.m.

Wascana
Saskatchewan

Liberal

Ralph Goodale Minister of Finance

Mr. Speaker, I am very pleased to report that members of Parliament, including most particularly members on this side of the House, have been very aggressive in advancing their point of view.

The recommendations of the committee are under active consideration. I am pleased to say that in the company of our members of Parliament I was able to meet with a number of representatives yesterday about the textile and apparel industry. We want to achieve a result that works for it, and it is very much on the government's agenda right now.

Textile and Clothing Industry
Oral Question Period

11:45 a.m.

Conservative

Gary Goodyear Cambridge, ON

Mr. Speaker, I also met with those very gentlemen yesterday and that is not the attitude they shared with me.

This House has 150 days to respond to an all party recommendation. The industry has only 60 days until extinction.

We need assurance from the minister that he will take direct and immediate action to implement this number one recommendation and ensure that not only Cambridge jobs, but jobs all across Canada will not be lost because of bureaucracy and paper shuffling.

Textile and Clothing Industry
Oral Question Period

11:45 a.m.

Wascana
Saskatchewan

Liberal

Ralph Goodale Minister of Finance

Mr. Speaker, I am very pleased to have the hon. gentleman's representation. I will add it to the list that I have received directly from the industry and from members of Parliament.

I am pleased to report that members of the government caucus raised this with me two months ago.

Royal Canadian Mounted Police
Oral Question Period

October 29th, 2004 / 11:45 a.m.

Bloc

Serge Ménard Marc-Aurèle-Fortin, QC

Mr. Speaker, various police associations in Quebec have also expressed concern about the RCMP's decision to close nine regional offices in Quebec and demand that an impact study be conducted before the decision becomes final.

Does the Minister of Public Safety and Emergency Preparedness intend to do as requested by the police associations, and suspend temporarily the RCMP's decision while impact studies are conducted?

Royal Canadian Mounted Police
Oral Question Period

11:45 a.m.

Etobicoke North
Ontario

Liberal

Roy Cullen Parliamentary Secretary to the Minister of Public Safety and Emergency Preparedness

Mr. Speaker, I thank the hon. member for his question. I want to say that this is a purely operational decision of the RCMP, following a comprehensive review of its services in Quebec. This review entailed extensive internal consultations with its employees and external consultations with its law enforcement partners, including the Quebec provincial police.

This same review was done in the province of Ontario just a few years ago. It was implemented, it is working and it is making a safer Ontario--

Royal Canadian Mounted Police
Oral Question Period

11:50 a.m.

The Speaker

The hon. member for Marc-Aurèle-Fortin.

Royal Canadian Mounted Police
Oral Question Period

11:50 a.m.

Bloc

Serge Ménard Marc-Aurèle-Fortin, QC

Mr. Speaker, this is more a matter calling for a comprehensive review by elected representatives. The same mistake was made in the past with the ports of Montreal.

To prevent another mistake, does the Minister of Public Safety and Emergency Preparedness not think that a moratorium would be in order, while the Standing Committee on Justice, Human Rights, Public Safety and Emergency Preparedness examines this decision and assesses its various impacts?

Royal Canadian Mounted Police
Oral Question Period

11:50 a.m.

Etobicoke North
Ontario

Liberal

Roy Cullen Parliamentary Secretary to the Minister of Public Safety and Emergency Preparedness

Mr. Speaker, I think that the decision is in the best interests of the citizens of Quebec and Canada. There will be no workforce reduction within the RCMP in Quebec. Resources will be redeployed to increase operational efficiency and meet strategic federal policing objectives, namely fighting organized crime and terrorism.

This is a consolidation of resources. It will make it more effective in the fight against organized crime and terrorism. It is supported by the stakeholders.

Health
Oral Question Period

11:50 a.m.

Conservative

Gurmant Grewal Newton—North Delta, BC

Mr. Speaker, my constituent, Alan Blumenfeld, got hepatitis C in 1981 through government controlled tainted blood and he still suffers today. The Liberals misled Parliament and hugely inflated compensation estimates. The Red Cross and Health Canada had warnings about the virus but chose to do nothing.

The billion dollar government compensation fund is just sitting and earning over $100 million in interest. Will the Prime Minister show some compassion and commit now to compensating all victims who got the virus through government controlled tainted blood?

Health
Oral Question Period

11:50 a.m.

West Nova
Nova Scotia

Liberal

Robert Thibault Parliamentary Secretary to the Minister of Health

Mr. Speaker, the minister has said many times in the House that he is absolutely willing to look at the fund to see if there is an actuarial surplus and it is established by the court, that the surplus be used for the best use possible. That use could very well include compensating the pre-1986 and post-1990 victims.

The member should remember that the government has done a lot for those people. It has invested $300 million with the provinces and over $500 million to help the victims of hepatitis C outside of the window.

The Environment
Oral Question Period

11:50 a.m.

Conservative

Mark Warawa Langley, BC

Mr. Speaker, last night Fraser Valley residents and politicians travelled to a Washington state public hearing to oppose the construction of a new polluting power plant only 500 meters from the Canadian border. SE2 would become the largest new air polluter in the Fraser Valley air shed.

Every day this week I have asked the environment minister about this. That minister was not at that meeting last night. November 1 is his last chance to oppose this polluter.

Will the minister act now to oppose that polluting power plant and stick up for the Canadian environment?