House of Commons Hansard #5 of the 38th Parliament, 1st Session. (The original version is on Parliament's site.) The word of the day was speech.

Topics

Canadian Heritage
Oral Question Period

11:45 a.m.

Jeanne-Le Ber
Québec

Liberal

Liza Frulla Minister of Canadian Heritage and Minister responsible for Status of Women

Mr. Speaker, the minister had to be there. I am repeating that this was an international and Canadian event. The minister's presence was compulsory.

Now, it was an electoral campaign. Does the member not think that the minister would have preferred to campaign in her own riding instead of going to Banff, and continuing her role as minister and assuming her ministerial responsibility? But she did so. Why? Because she was a professional.

Canadian Heritage
Oral Question Period

11:45 a.m.

Conservative

Lee Richardson Calgary South Centre, AB

Mr. Speaker, too professional--

Canadian Heritage
Oral Question Period

11:45 a.m.

The Speaker

Order, please. There seem to be a lot more than one question being asked at the moment. The hon. member for Calgary Centre is the one who has the floor. It is his question that we are going to hear and answer, not all of the questions that are going back and forth at the moment.

Canadian Heritage
Oral Question Period

11:45 a.m.

Conservative

Lee Richardson Calgary South Centre, AB

Mr. Speaker, the question was not about whether or not it was an important event. Of course the Banff festival is an important event.

The question was about her flying out on a government jet. I understand that she is too professional to fly commercial with the rest of us and she would rather the splendid isolation of a luxury government jet at the cost of $50,000 as compared to a commercial flight for $354. That was the question.

Canadian Heritage
Oral Question Period

11:50 a.m.

Jeanne-Le Ber
Québec

Liberal

Liza Frulla Minister of Canadian Heritage and Minister responsible for Status of Women

Mr. Speaker, she had to be there. She flew in and out. It was not a vacation. It was dependent on the schedule of the festival. But again, it was an important festival. She had to be there and professionally she felt that it was important for her to be there, so she took the means to go.

Government Spending
Oral Question Period

October 8th, 2004 / 11:50 a.m.

Conservative

Tom Lukiwski Regina—Lumsden—Lake Centre, SK

Mr. Speaker, on June 12 the Minister of Finance's director of parliamentary affairs took a trip to the minister's riding to “attend meetings with the minister”. This trip lasted 17 days and this individual returned to Ottawa on June 29, the day after the election.

Taxpayers paid over $2,800 for this trip including a food bill of almost $1,300. My question is for the Minister of Finance. Did this individual take part in any campaign related events during this trip?

Government Spending
Oral Question Period

11:50 a.m.

Wascana
Saskatchewan

Liberal

Ralph Goodale Minister of Finance

Mr. Speaker, during the course of the election campaign I ensured that all of my staff behaved completely in accordance with all of the rules.

Government Spending
Oral Question Period

11:50 a.m.

Conservative

Tom Lukiwski Regina—Lumsden—Lake Centre, SK

Mr. Speaker, for the moment let us forget about whether or not this may have been a violation of any election laws. Let us focus on the fact that the minister's staffer racked up a $2,800 bill in the minister's riding during an election campaign.

Does the Minister of Finance not agree that this looks an awful lot like a clear violation of election laws, or does the appearance of propriety not appeal to this minister?

Government Spending
Oral Question Period

11:50 a.m.

Wascana
Saskatchewan

Liberal

Ralph Goodale Minister of Finance

Mr. Speaker, I would be happy on any occasion to stack up my record for propriety with any member across the way.

Textile Industry
Oral Question Period

11:50 a.m.

Bloc

Pauline Picard Drummond, QC

Mr. Speaker, in Quebec there are nearly 40,000 jobs in the textile industry. With quotas to be removed in less than three months, the industry is threatened, especially by imports, and the government's action is ineffective. The rules of origin are ill-defined. The tariffs are mis-targeted.

Is the government waiting for the textile industry to disappear from Quebec's landscape before taking any properly targeted measures to save it and prevent having the few fabrics still produced here from being swept away by imports?

Textile Industry
Oral Question Period

11:50 a.m.

Wascana
Saskatchewan

Liberal

Ralph Goodale Minister of Finance

Mr. Speaker, obviously the government is very interested in the well-being of all Canadian businesses and industries in whatever sector they may be or in whatever region or province they may be.

In the previous Parliament we undertook certain steps to try to provide the appropriate action in relation to both the apparel sector and the textile sector and we continue to work very hard on that.

Some of these matters are, at the present time, before the Canadian International Trade Tribunal.

Textile Industry
Oral Question Period

11:50 a.m.

Bloc

Pauline Picard Drummond, QC

Mr. Speaker, our industries have to deal with competitors that sometimes use the worst forms of exploitation, such as forced labour and child labour. Canada cannot work toward eradicating such practices, since it has not even ratified all the International Labour Organization conventions that ban them.

What is the government waiting for to propose ratification to the House of the ILO treaties banning forced labour and child labour and allowing freedom of association?

Textile Industry
Oral Question Period

11:50 a.m.

London North Centre
Ontario

Liberal

Joe Fontana Minister of Labour and Housing

Mr. Speaker, as we know, the Government of Canada, through its international labour organization, its membership, its unions and a number of other stakeholder parties, has done some great things around the world in making sure those labour standards, of which the member spoke, are adhered to.

Canada has taken a leadership position, along with the Minister of Foreign Affairs, to ensure that Canadian labour standards are upheld not only in Canada but throughout the world.

The Environment
Oral Question Period

11:50 a.m.

Conservative

Bob Mills Red Deer, AB

Mr. Speaker, I have two interesting quotes regarding the lack of a Kyoto plan.

First we have the new environment minister saying “We came out with a plan in 2002 , but this plan is not enough and it was not intended to be enough”.

We now have the recently fired environment minister saying “There is no argument that he hasn't got a plan. The plans have been there for a long time”.

Can the minister finally be honest with Canadians and tell them whether we have a plan or whether we do not have a plan?

The Environment
Oral Question Period

11:55 a.m.

Saint-Laurent—Cartierville
Québec

Liberal

Stéphane Dion Minister of the Environment

Mr. Speaker, indeed we have a plan which we implemented in 2002.