House of Commons Hansard #28 of the 38th Parliament, 1st Session. (The original version is on Parliament's site.) The word of the day was environment.

Topics

Les Professeurs Pour La Liberté
Statements By Members

11:05 a.m.

Liberal

Lloyd St. Amand Brant, ON

Mr. Speaker, I rise in the House today to provide my support to a very worthwhile Canadian organization, Les professeurs pour la liberté. Like many hon. members, I am impressed by this unique group which is making enormous progress in educating the youth of Africa.

The essential goal of Les professeurs pour la liberté is to build a path that leads away from warfare, poverty and despair, and leads toward peace, opportunity and progress. Les professeurs pour la liberté is working on a program that would offer free online education to millions of Africans, an act that would reduce poverty and contribute to a more secure, equitable and prosperous world.

I would like to commend Les professeurs pour la liberté, their volunteers and contributors. By educating the youth of Africa, this group is providing a substantial contribution to our Canadian development policy of peace, human security and sustainable development.

Sir Frederick Banting
Statements By Members

11:05 a.m.

Liberal

Sue Barnes London West, ON

Mr. Speaker, I rise today to pay tribute to a great Londoner, Sir Frederick Banting. Recently, Dr. Banting was nominated by Canadians as one of the top 10 Canadians on the CBC TV show

The Greatest Canadian.

Sir Frederick Banting completed his medical studies at the University of Toronto and established a surgical practice in London, Ontario. In 1921 he returned to the University of Toronto to conduct medical research with his colleague, Charles Best. As a result of their research, they co-discovered pancreatic hormone insulin which was to be used in treating diabetes.

In 1923 Sir Frederick Banting was awarded the Nobel Prize for Medicine. That same year the University of Toronto established the Banting-Best Department of Medical Research with Sir Banting as its director.

Sir Frederick Banting's discovery of insulin changed the lives not only of Canadians, but also of individuals around the world with diabetes. Prior to the discovery of insulin, the life expectancy of a person with diabetes was less than a year from diagnosis.

Identity Theft
Statements By Members

11:10 a.m.

Conservative

Art Hanger Calgary Northeast, AB

Mr. Speaker, identity theft is one of the fastest growing crimes in North America. The perpetrators of this crime include organized criminal groups and individuals who collect and use someone else's personal identification to commit fraud and expedite other criminal offences.

It is estimated that identity theft costs the Canadian economy $2.5 billion annually. However, for the victims whose identity has been compromised, the impact goes far beyond dollars and cents. Not only must they deal with the financial loss, damaged reputation and emotional distress, they must also go through the complicated process of clearing their names.

This crime is so serious that the Ontario Provincial Police organized its second conference last October which brought together international identity theft experts to discuss the issue.

Given the gravity and growth of this crime, it is shocking that the government has not moved to create a separate offence for the possession of multiple identity documents. It is time the government acted to help eradicate this activity that has become so pervasive in our society.

India
Statements By Members

11:10 a.m.

Liberal

Roy Cullen Etobicoke North, ON

Mr. Speaker, on October 30 thousands of Canadians gathered at Nathan Phillips Square in Toronto to commemorate and pay respect to the victims of the violence that swept through northern India in the first week of November 1984.

Sikh Canadians have excelled in all walks of life, enriched the multicultural experience of our nation, and formed an integral part of the fabric of this country. We join with them as they remember families, friends and relatives who fell victim to the senseless looting, arson, rape and murder that took place 20 years ago.

We also express our solidarity and give credence to the belief that by remembering such dark episodes of history we are not allowing old ones to fester, but we are attempting to ensure that we learn from these episodes so that they are not repeated.

To honour the victims, candlelight vigils have been organized across North America. It was encouraging to see so many Canadians gathered at the vigil held in Toronto.

Transgender and Transsexual Day of Remembrance
Statements By Members

11:10 a.m.

NDP

Bill Siksay Burnaby—Douglas, BC

Mr. Speaker, November 20 is Transgender and Transsexual Day of Remembrance. This day will be marked in communities around the world to memorialize members of the trans community who have been killed due to anti-transgender hatred and prejudice. We must honour the lives of people who have been so brutally targeted, and those who face indifference and intolerance.

The Transgender and Transsexual Day of Remembrance should remind us all that trans people are members of our families, our friends, colleagues and neighbours. We must seek an end to the violence they face through understanding and human rights protections based on gender identity and expression.

John Morgan
Statements By Members

11:10 a.m.

Conservative

Myron Thompson Wild Rose, AB

Mr. Speaker, I would like to pay tribute to John Morgan, better known as “Mike from Canmore” on Royal Canadian Air Farce . As everyone remembers, “Mike from Canmore” was the thoughtful Albertan in the Calgary Flames cap.

He made his first appearance during a taping of the radio show in front of a live audience in Banff. The skit featured Mike, who called in to a radio show and seemed incapable of saying anything other than his own name and hometown. It was an instant hit and became a recurring feature on the radio and later the TV show.

In 1992 the Air Farce team became the first Canadian inductees into the International Humour Hall of Fame. Morgan was also known for co-creating the CBC radio series Funny You Should Say That and wrote the pilot of the popular series King of Kensington .

Morgan retired from Air Farce in 2001, telling everyone that after 35 years of writing comedy it was finally time to step down. He was described as eccentric, talented, prolific and very funny, a performer with whom audiences loved to laugh. John Morgan will be greatly missed. May he rest in peace.

Arthabaska Red Cross
Statements By Members

November 19th, 2004 / 11:10 a.m.

Bloc

André Bellavance Richmond—Arthabaska, QC

Mr. Speaker, the Arthabaska Red Cross distinguished itself at a provincial convention by winning the award of excellence in intervention.

Moreover, the organization, which is actively involved in 24 municipalities in my riding, received 34 citations for the commitment of its volunteers on the “flood” team, six certificates and merit badges, and a medal for dedicated services.

These awards were won in connection with the floods that hit the Bois-Francs region, on August 4, 2003. At the time, torrential rain forced 500 residents to temporarily abandon their homes and necessitated the evacuation of 150 people.

An award of distinction was also given to Sylvie Côté, publisher of the newspapers La Nouvelle , L'Union and L'Avenir de l'Érable . Together with Arthabaska Red Cross, she organized a fundraising campaign, and $280,000 was collected to help the victims.

Congratulations to the whole team of the Arthabaska Red Cross and to Sylvie Côté for their dedication.

The Senate
Statements By Members

11:15 a.m.

Conservative

Ken Epp Edmonton—Sherwood Park, AB

Mr. Speaker, to the Prime Minister, western alienation is just a vague concept, but to westerners, it is a cold, brutal reality. We love this country and we are proud to be part of it, but we just do not seem to count when we run into a crunch.

We have hundreds of ranchers and farmers who are in dire straits. Unfortunately, all we can get out of this Liberal government is announcement after announcement. We just never seem to get the cash that is being announced.

The Prime Minister claims that he cannot appoint Alberta senators because it is piecemeal. No, Mr. Speaker, he will still be appointing senators, just like always. We are simply asking that he choose the first choices of Albertans instead of his own Liberal bagmen. What would be wrong with that? Why does “Mr. Democratic Deficit” not understand that?

I challenge the Prime Minister to stop being so chicken. Let him step out on a limb and do what is right for the west for a change.

National Child Day
Statements By Members

11:15 a.m.

Liberal

Marlene Catterall Ottawa West—Nepean, ON

Mr. Speaker, tomorrow, November 20, marks National Child Day and the 15th anniversary of the United Nations Convention on the Rights of the Child.

This year's theme, “A Canada Fit for Children”, highlights the basic human rights that all children are entitled to, from the fundamental right to be protected from abuse, to their entitlement to grow into fully participating members of society.

In Ottawa, the multi-faith community will host the First Annual Manger Meal, paying tribute to those who work for a better life for children and especially to men who are role models for other men and for boys.

A place will be set for an “unknown child” to remind us of the many forgotten children who are victims of conflict, war, crimes and suffering. To quote Senator Landon Pearson:

We like to say 'a child is born into our world'. Let us also understand that in each child a world is born.

May we all work for a better world for all our children.

National Child Day
Statements By Members

11:15 a.m.

NDP

Ed Broadbent Ottawa Centre, ON

Mr. Speaker, Canadians honour their children on National Child Day. It is also a day to emphasize their rights as found in the Declaration of the Rights of the Child.

All children have the inherent right to live and grow with dignity as human beings. For example, children have rights to adequate food, clothes, housing and education. While other countries have virtually abolished child poverty, here in Canada, under the Liberals, we still have over one million children at the poverty level. That is an increase since this House unanimously passed a motion in 1989 calling for the eradication of child poverty.

The demand at food banks has doubled in the past 10 years and almost 40% of those who depend on food banks are under 18. We must be serious. We must invest in childhood education, child care, national housing and an innovative job program. These are needed, and needed now.

Citizenship and Immigration
Oral Question Period

11:15 a.m.

Conservative

John Reynolds West Vancouver—Sunshine Coast, BC

Mr. Speaker, the immigration minister's conduct during the election was clearly unethical. The minister claims she has referred the mess to the ethics commissioner.

The ethics commissioner's office has stated that it does not know what to investigate because it has not received any information. Why is the minister adding to her woes by misleading the House?

Citizenship and Immigration
Oral Question Period

11:15 a.m.

York West
Ontario

Liberal

Judy Sgro Minister of Citizenship and Immigration

Mr. Speaker, let me assure the member that all the information was forwarded on to the ethics commissioner.

I find it really interesting when we hear the opposition members. They hollered for so many years that they had to have an ethics commissioner. Now that we have one, they are trying to prejudge, in a lot of the their own comments, as to what the outcome is going to be.

Wait for the ethics commissioner's report, and I will be glad to share it all with them.

Citizenship and Immigration
Oral Question Period

11:15 a.m.

Conservative

John Reynolds West Vancouver—Sunshine Coast, BC

Mr. Speaker, the minister and the Prime Minister for days have told the House that the ethics commissioner was investigating this matter. Let me quote Micheline Rondeau-Parent from the ethics commissioner's office. She said:

--the Ethics Commissioner doesn't know what he is supposed to be investigating yet because he hasn't received any information from [the minister's department]....So he will have to look at whatever she presents to him, OK. At this stage she hasn't done that...I'm not even sure it is an investigation per se, but he will provide advice [when we receive information].

Why would the ethics commissioner's office tell us that yesterday, if the minister said that he already was investigating over the last three days? He is not investigating--

Citizenship and Immigration
Oral Question Period

11:15 a.m.

The Deputy Speaker

The hon. Minister of Citizenship and Immigration.

Citizenship and Immigration
Oral Question Period

11:15 a.m.

York West
Ontario

Liberal

Judy Sgro Minister of Citizenship and Immigration

Mr. Speaker, as I indicated earlier, I contacted the ethics commissioner myself, personally, and asked him to give me some advice. He has the full file, and we will wait for his assurance when it comes back. I will share it with the hon. member.