House of Commons Hansard #33 of the 38th Parliament, 1st Session. (The original version is on Parliament's site.) The word of the day was seniors.

Topics

Department of Social Development Act
Government Orders

11 a.m.

The Speaker

The hon. member has completed her remarks, so there will be an opportunity for questions and comments following statements by members, on which we are now about to embark.

Canadian Rangers
Statements By Members

11 a.m.

Liberal

Nancy Karetak-Lindell Nunavut, NU

Mr. Speaker, my constituent Peter Kuniliusie of Clyde River has retired after 52 years of service as a Canadian Ranger. Peter Kuniliusie was the longest serving Canadian Ranger when he finally retired at the age of 74 due to health reasons.

The Canadian Rangers are famous throughout the north for their search and rescue abilities and their contributions to our sovereignty and assertions in Canada's north.

From September 8, 1952 to November 3, 2004, unilingual Peter Kuniliusie, in his role as a Canadian Ranger, defended Canada during the cold war and asserted sovereignty over our vast north. I congratulate Peter Kuniliusie on his long service and wish him a happy retirement.

I also want to take the opportunity to thank him for his contributions and the sharing of his traditional knowledge to the people around him, whether it was with the Canadian Forces or with the young people of not only his community but all the north. I thank his family, too, for sharing him with us.

Banting Homestead
Statements By Members

11 a.m.

Conservative

Helena Guergis Simcoe—Grey, ON

Mr. Speaker, Canada's first Nobel Prize winner, Sir Frederick Banting, the discoverer of insulin, was born on a farm located in New Tecumseth in my riding of Simcoe--Grey. Thanks to his discovery, today diabetics worldwide enjoy a normal quality of life.

Edward Banting left the property to the Ontario Historical Society to maintain, preserve and protect as a place of historical significance. Instead, the OHS has allowed the buildings to deteriorate. The roof of the farmhouse leaks and the house is not insured.

I held a press conference at the homestead on October 29 and offered to work with the OHS to preserve this historic site. OHS lawyers responded by threatening to charge all those present with trespassing.

There are rumours that the OHS plans to sell off the land to a developer. I have requested a meeting with the Minister of Canadian Heritage to save this historic landmark. I look forward to her timely response.

Family Physicians
Statements By Members

11 a.m.

Liberal

Michael John Savage Dartmouth—Cole Harbour, NS

Mr. Speaker, this is Family Doctor Week in Canada. It is also the 50th anniversary of the College of Family Physicians.

The family doctor has been called the pillar of health care in Canada. As we strive to ensure the sustainability of our cherished health system, we need to make certain that we have a system that recognizes and supports the vital work of our GPs.

As the son of a family doctor, I know the burdens placed upon them. They work tirelessly on our behalf and they are the face of health for most Canadians, but the burdens on our family doctors are significant. The workload is staggering and the compensation has not kept up with the times. We must do more to ensure that these key caregivers are supported. We must ensure that more are trained in our medical schools.

We are privileged in my riding to have some of the most capable health professionals as family doctors. I am speaking of people like Dr. Jake O'Connor, former Canadian family physician of the year, and Dr. Louise Cloutier, chair of the board of the Canadian Medical Association, both of whom are actively involved in their community and in the fight for better health for Canadians.

We thank our family doctors for their commitment and their service.

Tourist Industry
Statements By Members

11 a.m.

Bloc

Robert Bouchard Chicoutimi—Le Fjord, QC

Mr. Speaker, in 2000, the Saguenay—Lac-Saint-Jean tourism association took part in a Canadian pilot project on extending the tourist season.

Its purpose was to make it possible for tourism industry workers to work for longer periods and the industry to open new markets.

Unfortunately, this program has not been renewed for the next two years, although doing so would enable 180 workers and 35 companies to reach the break-even point. I cannot understand why the Minister of Human Resources and Skills Development is delaying the go-ahead on this program, which has already proven itself, costs a mere $600,000 and has generated $4 million in spin-offs.

The minister needs to give the go-ahead right away to these workers who are worried at seeing the agreement termination date of December 10 approaching. This is an opportunity for the government to demonstrate its desire to contribute to the development of the regions of Quebec.

Tantramar Regional High School
Statements By Members

11:05 a.m.

Liberal

Dominic LeBlanc Beauséjour, NB

Mr. Speaker, a few weeks ago I spent time at the Tantramar Regional High School in Sackville, New Brunswick. I was invited to meet John Fougere's grade 12 political science class, something I have done and have enjoyed doing over the last number of years.

These young men and women demonstrated an outstanding interest in Canada's political affairs and showed great confidence in the future of not only their region in southeastern New Brunswick and Atlantic Canada but all of Canada as well. Their questions and comments convinced me of the impressive quality of education offered at the Tantramar Regional High School and, in particular, the dedication and insight of their political science teacher, John Fougere.

Our future is in good hands when I think of these impressive young men and women in Sackville, New Brunswick, and their dedication to building a prosperous future for all Canadians.

Engineering Scholarships
Statements By Members

11:05 a.m.

Conservative

Rob Anders Calgary West, AB

Mr. Speaker, the Canadian Engineering Memorial Foundation was founded to help attract women to the engineering profession. Each year this foundation awards scholarships to extraordinary young Canadians in engineering to assist them in pursuing their academic careers.

Funding for the foundation comes from the corporate sector as well as from thousands of individuals from across our great country. One of the key supporters is the Canadian Council of Professional Engineers, the national organization that licenses Canada's 160,000 professional engineers.

Today I wish to acknowledge a constituent of mine, Ms. Vassa Reentova, a student at the University of Calgary, who was selected as one of only five engineering students from across Canada to receive an undergraduate engineering scholarship from the Canadian Engineering Memorial Foundation. I want to wish her congratulations, along with the other scholarship award winners.

I also wish to congratulate the foundation for investing in the education of young Canadians and instilling in them the value of pursuing a career in engineering.

The Greatest Canadian
Statements By Members

11:05 a.m.

Liberal

Lloyd St. Amand Brant, ON

Mr. Speaker, the citizens of Brant are rightfully proud of the fact that two of the 10 finalists in the Greatest Canadian contest have a very substantial connection to Brant. Wayne Gretzky was born and raised in Brantford, and Alexander Graham Bell invented the telephone in Brantford. There are other persons of tremendous accomplishment who were connected to Brant, including many women.

I wish to inform the House about Dr. Emily Stowe who was named the first female physician in Canada. As a pioneer suffragette, she was instrumental in establishing the vote for women in Canada.

Adelaide Hoodless Hunter was born outside of St. George, Ontario. She was one of Canada's most creative social reformers, a primary participant in the establishment of the Women's Institute, the National Council of Women in Canada, the Victorian Order of Nurses, and the YMCA.

Pauline Johnson was born and raised on the Six Nations Reserve and was the first native poet to have her work published in Canada.

Simply put, Brant takes great pride in the accomplishments of all of its citizens.

Maison Simons
Statements By Members

11:05 a.m.

Bloc

Roger Clavet Louis-Hébert, QC

Mr. Speaker, recently the people of Quebec City learned that La Maison Simons was making a gift to the city for its 400th anniversary. The gift is a fountain that has been restored and imported from France, where it was located in Bordeaux's allées de Tourny, named after Aubert Tourny, a French intendant remembered for his contribution to the beautification of Bordeaux, Quebec City's sister city.

The fontaine de Tourny, which was constructed in the mid-19th century, won a gold medal at the Paris world exposition of 1855.

Peter Simons, the president of La Maison Simons, fell in love with this fountain when he saw it in a French antique dealer's. He could see it in Quebec's capital. The Government of Quebec, its national capital commission and the city of Quebec were delighted to accept this gift, and express their thanks to the Simons family for this gracious gesture on the occasion of the celebration of the 400th anniversary of the founding of Quebec City.

The Bloc Québécois congratulates the Simons family for its generous donation of such a wonderful gift.

Herring Fishery
Statements By Members

11:05 a.m.

Liberal

Lawrence MacAulay Cardigan, PE

Mr. Speaker, another disaster is looming in the Atlantic fishery as midshore seiners continue to fish herring off the north shore of Prince Edward Island, putting the homing stock in danger and threatening the livelihood of local fishermen.

In 1984 the herring line was moved closer to shore allowing the seiners to fish where they never should have been permitted to fish. It is time for the minister and the government to do the right thing, the right thing for the conservation of the resource, the right thing for local fishermen. It is time to restore the original 25 fathom line.

The inshore herring fishery has been a healthy and valuable resource not only to the families and communities who depend upon it directly, but also to the valuable lobster industry in Prince Edward Island.

Time is running out for the government on this important matter which affects the economy of Prince Edward Island. Islanders need action and they need it now.

Drug Strategy
Statements By Members

November 26th, 2004 / 11:10 a.m.

Conservative

Randy White Abbotsford, BC

Mr. Speaker, the government tabled Bill C-17, decriminalization of marijuana, in the House. This bill applies to children over the age of 11 in this nation. Children will have discounts on fines, and in fact, according to the justice department, they will likely not have to pay fines at all.

On the other hand, crystal meth, ecstasy, cocaine and heroin run rampant through the streets in this country. To combat that, the government has thought of a program called injection sites where individuals can bring drugs in and shoot up, a bubble zone where nobody will tackle the drug issue at all.

Does this sound like a government that knows what it is doing? Does this sound like a government that actually has a legitimate national drug strategy? Does this sound like a government that should stay in power? Then let us do something about it. Let us change the government.

National Arts Centre Orchestra
Statements By Members

11:10 a.m.

Liberal

David Anderson Victoria, BC

Mr. Speaker, I rise today to congratulate the National Arts Centre Orchestra, led by maestro Pinchas Zukerman, on its return from a splendid tour of British Columbia which culminated in a concert in my riding of Victoria last Thursday evening.

The two week tour consisted of four evening concerts, student matinees, and over 80 educational student events involving teaching of children, with special emphasis on first nations children in communities all across British Columbia.

Thanks go out to Canadian National, Yamaha and many other sponsors who made this tour possible.

Bravo to the National Arts Centre Orchestra for taking its talent on the road and delighting audiences throughout British Columbia.

Sikh Community
Statements By Members

11:10 a.m.

NDP

Bill Blaikie Elmwood—Transcona, MB

Mr. Speaker, today members of the Canadian Sikh community will be protesting at the French embassy the new French laws which prohibit the wearing of turbans, among other religious items that apply to other religions.

I want to rise to indicate the support of the NDP for this protest and to celebrate the fact that we do things differently here in Canada, most of the time. One of the things we could do which would be helpful to affirm the fact that we do things differently here in Canada would be to finally pass a motion which I introduced in a previous Parliament and which was introduced in the last Parliament by the member for Winnipeg North Centre to affirm the importance of the five Ks to the Sikh community and the contribution of the Sikh community to Canada.

This is a motion that almost passed but it was not votable under a previous private members' business regime. I understand that my House leader will be initiating discussions with other House leaders. Perhaps very soon we could have a motion affirming the five Ks in this House and show that we are indeed a different country.

Courage Campaign
Statements By Members

11:10 a.m.

Conservative

Guy Lauzon Stormont—Dundas—South Glengarry, ON

Mr. Speaker, on November 23, some 200 people attended a special dinner in Cornwall in my riding of Stormont—Dundas—South Glengarry. This dinner was in support of the first annual Courage Campaign which has raised $11,000 for the Ottawa Regional Cancer Centre Foundation.

The Kinsmen Club of Cornwall donated $5,000 and the dinner raised another $6,000. All of the money raised will go toward a project to double the size of the hospital. The keynote speaker, CJOH news personality Max Keeping, praised the people of Stormont—Dundas—South Glengarry for their caring and their generosity.

The Courage Campaign will continue until December 15. I encourage everyone in eastern Ontario to lend their support to this excellent cause.

Canadian Broadcasting Corporation
Statements By Members

11:10 a.m.

Bloc

Raynald Blais Gaspésie—Îles-de-la-Madeleine, QC

Mr. Speaker, I am very concerned about the recent reorganization of the Canadian Broadcasting Corporation in the Gaspé Peninsula and the Magdalen Islands.

Budgets for CBC radio correspondents in Chaleur Bay and the Magdalen Islands were cut, and now the CBC just transferred its correspondent for the Chaleur Bay region to its facilities in Matane, moving him more than 200 kilometres away.

Rather than promoting regional development, the CBC prefers to abandon the regions. Yet, in September 2004, its CEO, Robert Rabinovitch, said that the CBC had a duty to provide a balanced and high-quality information service on which all Canadians could rely.

The Gaspé Peninsula and the Magdalen Islands deserve better. This situation must be corrected and it must be corrected quickly.