House of Commons Hansard #50 of the 37th Parliament, 3rd Session. (The original version is on Parliament's site.) The word of the day was health.

Topics

Gasoline Prices
Oral Question Period

11:50 a.m.

Bloc

Paul Crête Kamouraska—Rivière-Du-Loup—Témiscouata—Les Basques, QC

Mr. Speaker, through its inaction the federal government is contributing to maintaining the unreasonable increase in gasoline prices, which is having a major negative impact on the economy of small businesses, transportation and taxi industries and on inflation in general.

Will the federal government, the Minister of Industry in particular, react in order to stop the negative effects of the fluctuating gas prices?

Gasoline Prices
Oral Question Period

11:50 a.m.

Westmount—Ville-Marie
Québec

Liberal

Lucienne Robillard Minister of Industry and Minister responsible for the Economic Development Agency of Canada for the Regions of Quebec

Mr. Speaker, the Canadian government is concerned by what is currently happening with respect to the steep hike in gas prices and the economic impact this may have on consumers and businesspeople. The government still maintains that gas prices are set by market forces and not by anti-competitive practices.

Yesterday, the Minister of Natural Resources said that he would contact his provincial counterparts to discuss this problem and determine with them what solutions could be implemented.

Gasoline Prices
Oral Question Period

11:50 a.m.

Bloc

Paul Crête Kamouraska—Rivière-Du-Loup—Témiscouata—Les Basques, QC

Mr. Speaker, is it not the Prime Minister's responsibility to send a clear message to the oil companies by creating a petroleum monitoring agency or by launching a broad inquiry into the oil industry? When will the Prime Minister send them a clear message?

Gasoline Prices
Oral Question Period

11:50 a.m.

Westmount—Ville-Marie
Québec

Liberal

Lucienne Robillard Minister of Industry and Minister responsible for the Economic Development Agency of Canada for the Regions of Quebec

Mr. Speaker, it is clear—and the member for Kamouraska—Rivière-du-Loup—Témiscouata—Les Basques has just given us an example—that the Bloc, by virtue of being in opposition for many years—and it will stay in opposition—thinks it has the magic recipe for solving highly complex international problems. The Canadian government is implementing a series of initiatives in order to be able to meet these challenges, but it also must cooperate with its international partners with respect to events happening on the oil market.

Veterans Affairs
Oral Question Period

11:55 a.m.

Canadian Alliance

Art Hanger Calgary Northeast, AB

Mr. Speaker, yesterday Veterans Affairs spokeswoman Janice Summerby was asked about the government's refusal to fund the war veterans' trip to D-Day ceremonies in Normandy. She was quoted as saying, “They can enjoy the overseas ceremony on television”.

My question for the minister is, why should World War II veterans watch from the sidelines today when they fought on the front lines 60 years ago?

Veterans Affairs
Oral Question Period

11:55 a.m.

Compton—Stanstead
Québec

Liberal

David Price Parliamentary Secretary to the Minister of National Defence

Mr. Speaker, in actual fact what the member is not mentioning is that there will be ceremonies all across Canada on that day and they will have a chance to participate in those. As I said before, we are looking at ways to assist others to go.

Veterans Affairs
Oral Question Period

11:55 a.m.

Canadian Alliance

Art Hanger Calgary Northeast, AB

Mr. Speaker, Veterans Affairs is obviously dragging its feet on the issue. Here we are at the 11th hour and it has still made no decision.

D-Day veteran Joe Galombos in my constituency received a letter from Veterans Affairs telling him to pay his own way to the Normandy ceremony. His question for the minister is, “I was good enough to fight for this country 60 years ago and the government supported my way over there then. Why now am I told to pay my own way to Normandy if I want to participate?”

Veterans Affairs
Oral Question Period

11:55 a.m.

Compton—Stanstead
Québec

Liberal

David Price Parliamentary Secretary to the Minister of National Defence

Mr. Speaker, I thought I was clear before that Veterans Affairs does not choose the veterans who go. This is done by the regiments and the different associations. It is not Veterans Affairs that chooses.

Mental Health
Oral Question Period

11:55 a.m.

Liberal

Marcel Proulx Hull—Aylmer, QC

Mr. Speaker, my question is for the Minister of Health. This week is Mental Health Week in Canada. Mental health indirectly affects everyone, whether it is through a parent, a friend or a colleague, regardless of age, education, revenue or culture.

What is the Government of Canada doing about mental health?

Mental Health
Oral Question Period

11:55 a.m.

Papineau—Saint-Denis
Québec

Liberal

Pierre Pettigrew Minister of Health

Mr. Speaker, I thank the hon. member for his very important question. Along with all the provinces and territories across Canada, we are trying to find solutions to mental health issues. We have numerous programs in place to support this commitment. The Canadian Institutes of Health Research are currently investing over $30 million in research relating to mental health.

Hon. members can show their support by visiting the National Gallery of Canada, where an exhibit entitled “Mindscapes” is featuring works created by artists affected by mental illness. I had the opportunity to see it two days ago. It is very important. We must congratulate our artists.

Fisheries
Oral Question Period

May 7th, 2004 / 11:55 a.m.

Progressive Conservative

Loyola Hearn St. John's West, NL

Mr. Speaker, yesterday three ministers called a press conference to announce that citations had been issued to foreign vessels fishing on the nose and tail of the Grand Banks.

My question is for the parliamentary secretary to the fisheries minister. What effect did these citations have and are these boats still fishing?

Fisheries
Oral Question Period

11:55 a.m.

Hillsborough
P.E.I.

Liberal

Shawn Murphy Parliamentary Secretary to the Minister of Fisheries and Oceans

Mr. Speaker, this issue is being taken very seriously by the Prime Minister, the Minister of Fisheries and Oceans, the Minister of Natural Resources and the Minister of Foreign Affairs.

What we saw yesterday was just a part of the continuum that is going on with air and sea surveillance, and international agreements.

The hon. member said yesterday that he thought this was a joke. If he thinks that for a fisheries officer to go on a foreign vessel for 35 hours is a joke, I say he is playing politics.

Fisheries
Oral Question Period

11:55 a.m.

Progressive Conservative

Loyola Hearn St. John's West, NL

Mr. Speaker, for two and a half years we have been beating this into their heads.

Let me ask the member, why over the last 10 years have we issued 300 plus citations and nothing has been done? Exactly the same breaking of regulations took place this week and just because it is a week before an election call we have a big hoopla.

Why was there special treatment given to the issuing of a citation yesterday and not over the past 10 years?

Fisheries
Oral Question Period

Noon

Hillsborough
P.E.I.

Liberal

Shawn Murphy Parliamentary Secretary to the Minister of Fisheries and Oceans

Mr. Speaker, as I just said, this is being treated very aggressively as a priority by the government, the Prime Minister, and a number of ministers. It deals with our multilateral agreements.

Some 14 months ago we were talking about multilateral agreements. The opposition members led by their leader were screaming at us. They were telling us to turn our backs on international law, turn our backs on multilateral agreements, turn our backs on our international partners, and send our troops to Iraq.

We did not follow the opposition's advice then and we should be cautious about following it right now.

Acton International Plant
Oral Question Period

Noon

Bloc

Yvan Loubier Saint-Hyacinthe—Bagot, QC

Mr. Speaker, the workers at the plant of Acton International in Acton Vale had some sad news yesterday: 240 of them, mostly younger workers, will be losing their jobs at the end of August.

In response to this massive layoff, will the minister at last decide to revive POWA, which, if available in this particular case, could have convinced the older workers to take early retirement, thereby limiting the layoffs affecting the younger ones?