House of Commons Hansard #139 of the 38th Parliament, 1st Session. (The original version is on Parliament's site.) The word of the day was vehicle.

Topics

Marichel Teaching Farm
Statements By Members

11:15 a.m.

Bloc

Odina Desrochers Lotbinière—Chutes-de-la-Chaudière, QC

Mr. Speaker, the Marichel teaching farm in Sainte-Agathe-de-Lotbinière is celebrating its 10th anniversary. This farm is not only introducing children to the benefits of agriculture, it is teaching them the importance of preserving our environment to ensure the survival of our planet.

In celebration, the 2005 student interns wrote a song to raise public awareness about the effects of climate change.

I had the pleasure of hearing this song on September 16, between the two hurricanes that devastated the southern United States. Everyone agrees that these two tragedies were caused by climate change in that region over the last 25 years.

These young people have summed it up as follows:

Such great ideas sung with forceThey do affect my mood, of courseNow tell me what we need to doTo save the earth for me and you

Bravo and long live the Marichel teaching farm.

David Dingwall
Oral Questions

October 21st, 2005 / 11:15 a.m.

Conservative

Peter MacKay Central Nova, NS

Mr. Speaker, it is now clear that the Prime Minister himself is directly responsible for the decision to pay David Dingwall severance for quitting his expense abusing, high paying job at the Mint. The Liberal culture of corruption has now progressed to the Liberal culture of entitlement.

The Minister of National Revenue told us yesterday that Privy Council lawyers are operating under the instructions of the Prime Minister to pay the legal minimum. Labour lawyers such as Howard Levitt and those in his own caucus have already said there is no legal requirement to pay severance to an employee if he quits.

Why exactly is the Prime Minister directing his officials to pay anything to David Dingwall?

David Dingwall
Oral Questions

11:15 a.m.

Winnipeg South
Manitoba

Liberal

Reg Alcock President of the Treasury Board and Minister responsible for the Canadian Wheat Board

Mr. Speaker, the minister has been exceptionally clear on this point. It is going to be very interesting when we compare the hyperbole of the opposition with the reality of the audit that is coming out soon.

David Dingwall
Oral Questions

11:15 a.m.

Conservative

Peter MacKay Central Nova, NS

There is a buffet of baloney, Mr. Speaker.

David Dingwall clearly said at committee that he was entitled to his entitlements. That includes severance on top of everything else. There are two solitudes in Canada: hardworking, tax paying Canadians and Liberals with entitlements.

The government can produce no law that requires this severance payment, no written legal opinions, and no common law precedents, yet the Prime Minister is directing the Privy Council Office to negotiate David Dingwall's entitlements.

Why is the Prime Minister encouraging this Liberal culture of entitlement with this negotiation with David Dingwall?

David Dingwall
Oral Questions

11:15 a.m.

Winnipeg South
Manitoba

Liberal

Reg Alcock President of the Treasury Board and Minister responsible for the Canadian Wheat Board

Mr. Speaker, as I responded to the previous question, the minister has been very clear on this particular point and the member has repeated some of his statements. I also think that for a person who has an understanding of the law, to lack such respect for its application is rather a surprise to all of us.

David Dingwall
Oral Questions

11:20 a.m.

Conservative

Peter MacKay Central Nova, NS

Mr. Speaker, let us stick to the facts.

On the Prime Minister's instructions, David Dingwall's lawyers are negotiating with the Privy Council Office to secure his entitlements. That would include severance pay. Now he wants the possibility of his cost of living factor on top of his salary to be considered as well. The government has yet to produce all of David Dingwall's expenses. That might include other expenses that will rub Canadians the wrong way.

We know that Canadians who quit their job do not get severance. Why is the Prime Minister taking such a hands-on approach in negotiating a severance package with David Dingwall?

David Dingwall
Oral Questions

11:20 a.m.

Winnipeg South
Manitoba

Liberal

Reg Alcock President of the Treasury Board and Minister responsible for the Canadian Wheat Board

Mr. Speaker, once again, I would simply point out that given the kind and quality of information that has come across the floor from that side of the House, it is really difficult to give credibility to any of the questions.

An audit will be out next week. Opposition members will be able to judge the circumstances that they are interested in and we will see how that matches up with the statements they have made to date.

David Dingwall
Oral Questions

11:20 a.m.

Conservative

Brian Pallister Portage—Lisgar, MB

Mr. Speaker, how little expenses are handled tells us a lot about how a person will handle big expenses.

David Dingwall handed in receipts in April of last year for two candies for $1.43, a Globe and Mail for 93¢, a chocolate bar, a bag of chips, and a Winnipeg Sun . On December 16 of last year he handed in a receipt for a massage in Bangkok. This Liberal culture of entitlement has gone far too far.

Perhaps the government could tell us if David Dingwall is entitled to a massage at the expense of Canadian taxpayers?

David Dingwall
Oral Questions

11:20 a.m.

Winnipeg South
Manitoba

Liberal

Reg Alcock President of the Treasury Board and Minister responsible for the Canadian Wheat Board

Mr. Speaker, I am not certain what the member's concern is about the Winnipeg Sun . A number of people in Canada buy and read that paper.

He has made a number of statements about the activities of Mr. Dingwall. Mr. Dingwall was before the committee answering that. An audit is coming out. I have been reviewing some of the statements that the member has been making and I think the Winnipeg Sun will have an interesting time comparing reality with what has come out of the mouth of that member.

David Dingwall
Oral Questions

11:20 a.m.

Conservative

Brian Pallister Portage—Lisgar, MB

Mr. Speaker, the fact of the matter is that the rules at the Royal Canadian Mint were written by David Dingwall under this government's watch. The rules provide exceptions for David Dingwall. He can except himself on travel. He can except himself on hospitality. There are no fences on David Dingwall's pasture. He can graze at the expense of Canadian taxpayers to his heart's content.

The culture of entitlement that has permeated this government was most evident when David Dingwall testified the other day. Will the government continue and persist to pay David Dingwall severance?

David Dingwall
Oral Questions

11:20 a.m.

Winnipeg South
Manitoba

Liberal

Reg Alcock President of the Treasury Board and Minister responsible for the Canadian Wheat Board

Mr. Speaker, the depth of the unknowing on that side of the House is such that they did not even realize the Auditor General of Canada is the auditor for the Mint, that the policy is set by the board of the Mint, that it is being audited still further against those policies set by the Mint and audited by the Auditor General of Canada.

To suggest that we not respect that I think is a bit much.

Intergovernmental Affairs
Oral Questions

11:20 a.m.

Bloc

Monique Guay Rivière-du-Nord, QC

Mr. Speaker, first it was Quebec's minister of intergovernmental affairs and now it is the Quebec premier who is speaking out in defence of Quebec's jurisdiction. He has said that “If we must work with the federal government, our jurisdiction must be respected. Otherwise, no agreement is possible.”

Is this not proof that things are not going all that well, when a federalist Liberal government in Quebec feels obliged to publicly defend its areas of jurisdiction, in response to repeated threats of federal government interference?

Intergovernmental Affairs
Oral Questions

11:20 a.m.

Westmount—Ville-Marie
Québec

Liberal

Lucienne Robillard President of the Queen's Privy Council for Canada and Minister of Intergovernmental Affairs

Mr. Speaker, the Prime Minister of Canada himself has said that he would respect provincial jurisdictions in whatever he did. We wholly approve of the statements made by federalist premier Charest.

Intergovernmental Affairs
Oral Questions

11:20 a.m.

Bloc

Monique Guay Rivière-du-Nord, QC

Mr. Speaker, she ought to have a word with the Minister of Transport so that he will be on the same page.

Jean Charest also criticized the concept of national interest, that new federal invention used to justify its interference. He said “the national interest is not a concept that governs the division of powers”.

Does the government not realize that the introduction of this new concept will turn the concept of areas of jurisdiction into nothing more than meaningless words?

Intergovernmental Affairs
Oral Questions

11:25 a.m.

Westmount—Ville-Marie
Québec

Liberal

Lucienne Robillard President of the Queen's Privy Council for Canada and Minister of Intergovernmental Affairs

Mr. Speaker, there the Bloc Québécois goes again with its exaggerations. It is fascinating how they take bits and pieces of quotes from the federalist government in Quebec and forget the rest.

It is odd that they are not quoting today from the words of Carole Théberge or Monique Gagnon-Tremblay, who say they are continuing to work in a positive manner with the Government of Canada. That is exactly what our two governments are doing.