House of Commons Hansard #144 of the 38th Parliament, 1st Session. (The original version is on Parliament's site.) The word of the day was columbia.

Topics

50th Anniversary of UNICEF
Statements By Members

2:05 p.m.

Liberal

David McGuinty Ottawa South, ON

Mr. Speaker, this year marks the 50th anniversary of UNICEF Canada and, this evening, millions of children in Canada will collect money for UNICEF.

It was 50 years ago today that Canadians first found little goblins at their doors trick or treating for donations to UNICEF. As a former officer with UNICEF in west Africa, I can speak first-hand about the importance of these donations.

UNICEF is dedicated to protecting the rights of children and depends entirely on donations.

Since 1955 Canadian children have raised $87 million for UNICEF. This year's goal is to raise $4 million for schools, teacher training, and books in Africa.

I encourage all Canadians to put aside a few loonies tonight for the good goblins with the bright orange boxes. I congratulate UNICEF Canada on its 50th anniversary.

ADISQ Gala
Statements By Members

October 31st, 2005 / 2:05 p.m.

Bloc

Maka Kotto Saint-Lambert, QC

Mr. Speaker, over the past week and culminating last evening, the personality of Quebec song in its many facets based on a distinct experience and consciousness expressed itself most eloquently for the 27th year at the ADISQ gala.

On behalf of my Bloc colleagues, I express my pride and admiration for all the artists and craftspeople in Quebec's musical milieu for their wonderful work, be they winners or not.

Their potential is enormous, but it must be noted that the federal government, scourge of Quebec and Canada's cultural sovereignty, is not striving to protect francophone song and to ensure its longevity and popularity in that new broadcast space made available by satellite radio.

When francophone content on commercial radio is reviewed, we call for more space to be given to these extraordinary voices coming out of Quebec.

Mark Lowry
Statements By Members

2:05 p.m.

Liberal

Eleni Bakopanos Ahuntsic, QC

Mr. Speaker, I rise in the House today, to recognize Mr. Mark Lowry, who passed away Saturday, October 22nd after a two-year battle with cancer. Mr. Lowry was the Executive Director of Sport for the Canadian Olympic Committee.

Mr. Lowry worked throughout his career at the local and national levels of amateur sport. He held positions with the Canadian Interuniversity Athletic Union, the Canadian Amateur Rowing Association, the Canadian Amateur Diving Association, the World University Games and the Canadian Olympic Committee.

His dedication, passion and vision have led to significant advancements for Canadian sport and athletes.

Mr. Lowry was a dedicated worker and true believer in the Olympic movement.

I wish to recognize his great contribution to sport and offer my condolences to his family and friends.

Assisted Suicide
Statements By Members

2:05 p.m.

Conservative

Bradley Trost Saskatoon—Humboldt, SK

Mr. Speaker, the introduction of Bill C-407 on assisted suicide has once more brought to this House a bill dealing with the precious gift of life.

Many in this House will express their painful choices and divulge a wrestling deep within their souls.

This issue is only difficult if one holds to a material, chance view of the universe, if one holds purely utilitarian values, and if one denies that there is an intrinsic value in human life. It can only be tortuous if one holds that the underlying validation of life is wanton service of self.

For those of us who acknowledge that life has value distinct beyond all else, our choice will be instinctive. Our choice will be the affirmation of the immense value of the most vulnerable of our society, a reiteration that every person is of immeasurable worth.

When a society in any way invalidates the sanctity of life, it throws in its lot with evil incarnate. As members of this House, let us do better. Let us choose life. Life: what a beautiful choice.

Kiwanis International
Statements By Members

2:10 p.m.

Liberal

Marlene Catterall Ottawa West—Nepean, ON

Mr. Speaker, this year Kiwanis International celebrates 90 years of serving the children of the world.

There are more than 600,000 members of Kiwanis in 96 countries.

In 1994, Kiwanis International promised the children of the world to eliminate the most prevalent preventable cause of mental retardation: iodine deficiency. This goal is imminent and will rank as one of the world's greatest health achievements.

Last Friday Ottawa hosted Kiwanis International President Steve Siemens as Rideau Kiwanis celebrated its 50th anniversary. Today we welcome to Ottawa Hazel Brandon of Suriname, the governor of the Eastern Canada and Caribbean District of Kiwanis. Governor Hazel is completing her official visit to clubs in Ottawa and area.

On behalf of all members of the House, I thank Kiwanians across Canada for their good work and encourage Canadians to learn more about Kiwanis in their own communities.

New Democratic Party
Statements By Members

2:10 p.m.

NDP

Peter Stoffer Sackville—Eastern Shore, NS

Mr. Speaker, it was with great sadness that one of the finest political leaders in the country, in Newfoundland and Labrador, decided to resign his position as leader of the provincial New Democrats of Newfoundland and Labrador.

Mr. Jack Harris served his party, his constituency and the people of Newfoundland and Labrador with great distinction.

He was also a member of Parliament in this House from 1987 to 1988.

Mr. Harris's first thought was always for the people of his riding of Signal Hill--Quidi Vidi.

During all the rough times Newfoundland and Labrador had during the downturn of the fishery and the closure of the mills, the people of Newfoundland had one voice they could go to and that was the voice of Mr. Jack Harris.

On behalf of the federal New Democrats and our leader from Toronto—Danforth, we would like to offer our sincere appreciation to Jack's wife, Ann Martin, and their three children, Amelia, John and Sarah, for sharing Mr. Harris with us and the people of Newfoundland and Labrador.

We wish Mr. Harris the very best in the future.

Flames of Memory
Statements By Members

2:10 p.m.

Conservative

Jason Kenney Calgary Southeast, AB

Mr. Speaker, yesterday I had the honour of taking part in the historic groundbreaking ceremony for Flames of Memory, the Jewish war veterans memorial in Toronto, on behalf of the Leader of the Opposition, who is an honorary co-chair.

Sixty years after the end of World War II and the liberation of Auschwitz, the Jewish war veterans memorial will help to preserve the memory of Jewish war heroes for all Canadians.

When World War II began, nearly 17,000 Jewish Canadians enlisted in the armed forces, representing some three quarters of eligible Jewish men at the time, the highest per capita enlistment of any ethnic group in Canada.

In defending the causes of freedom and democracy in the fight against Nazism and fascism, they proudly carried on their rich Jewish tradition of tikkun olam , repairing the world.

The flames of the menorah, which symbolize the triumph of light over darkness and the victory of liberty over tyranny, will now forever honour the memory of Jewish war veterans in Canada and worldwide.

On behalf of all members, I would like to congratulate committee chairman Joel Wagman and his team for this magnificent project to preserve a sacred memory which must never be lost.

We will remember them.

Women's History Month
Statements By Members

2:10 p.m.

Bloc

Nicole Demers Laval, QC

Mr. Speaker, October is Women's History Month. Inaugurated in 1992, the month offers a fine opportunity to recognize women's contribution to society. This year's theme is “Women and War: Contributions and Consequences”.

Women have made major contributions to the war effort and to the peace movement. Their emancipation on the labour market was one of the results of that involvement. Women have made great strides in providing a voice for the victims of armed conflict, who are often women and children,

They have played a lead role in encouraging peaceful solutions, while defending human rights. Many women have lost a father, husband or children to war. Many have been left to raise their families alone.

We in the Bloc Québécois are grateful to these women who have made their mark on history.

Conservative Party of Canada
Statements By Members

2:15 p.m.

Conservative

Peter Goldring Edmonton East, AB

Mr. Speaker, 10 years ago on the eve of Hallowe'en I was in Quebec City pacing the Plains of Abraham as Quebec narrowly rejected separation in a referendum that had an entire nation holding its breath.

Ten years ago Canada was at the brink, driven there by an inept Liberal government in Ottawa and an opportunistic separatist government in Quebec. Under the Liberals' watch, the separatists nearly succeeded, but for Canadians joining in a unity rally of unprecedented proportions in Montreal, showing Quebeckers that Canadians truly cared.

Today the Liberals remain bereft of unity efforts, instead being mired in the muck of a decade of more political corruption. The Liberals' persistent plundering of taxpayers for political gain has poisoned the unity well.

Canada deserves better. Canadian unity will evolve with a new, visionary Conservative government that will stand up for Canada and demonstrate honesty, respect and equality for all.

HapMap
Statements By Members

2:15 p.m.

Liberal

Marlene Jennings Notre-Dame-de-Grâce—Lachine, QC

Mr. Speaker, I would like to speak about an exciting and significant development announced on October 26 called HapMap.

HapMap is powerful medical research tool intended to speed the discovery of genetic contribution to common diseases like asthma, diabetes, cancer and heart disease.

I am proud to say that two Canadian researchers, working in conjunction with their foreign partners, have made a huge contribution toward making this tool available to Canadians and to the rest of the world. It will accelerate screening for the genes that cause certain diseases.

Dr. Tom Hudson, of the Genome Quebec Innovation Centre and McGill University, and Bertha Knoppers of the Université de Montréal, were the driving forces behind this remarkable scientific breakthrough.

It is another example of the Canadian government's commitment to investing in Canadian research. We were the first country to invest in this international consortium, with the commitment of $50 million in April 2002.

Sponsorship Program
Oral Questions

2:15 p.m.

Calgary Southwest
Alberta

Conservative

Stephen Harper Leader of the Opposition

Mr. Speaker, last week the Prime Minister claimed that it was Justice Gomery who required him to have a copy of the report before the other opposition leaders. Today, Justice Gomery has written to the opposition leaders to deny this. In fact, he says that our request deserves consideration. I am willing to table that letter.

Will the Prime Minister finally do the right thing, be open and transparent and give the other leaders a copy of the report as soon as he gets a copy?

Sponsorship Program
Oral Questions

2:15 p.m.

LaSalle—Émard
Québec

Liberal

Paul Martin Prime Minister

Mr. Speaker, both the government and the commission have logistical needs which must be followed. The government has always received reports of this significance in advance because it is in the unique position of having to act.

For instance, the precedent is clear. In the case of the Somalia inquiry, the government received the report three days ahead of time. In the case of the Krever inquiry on contaminated blood, the government received the report five days ahead of time. In the case of the Commission on Aboriginal Peoples, it was 20 days.

In this case, the government has given itself the shortest time period, 12 hours.

Sponsorship Program
Oral Questions

2:15 p.m.

Calgary Southwest
Alberta

Conservative

Stephen Harper Leader of the Opposition

In other words, Mr. Speaker, the Prime Minister intends to act like Jean Chrétien, exactly.

The Prime Minister wrongly stated that the decision to provide him with a copy before the other leaders was made by Justice Gomery. Today the latter has said that it is clear that the Prime Minister has a choice.

Will the Prime Minister do what must be done and put an end to all the secrecy? Will he immediately hand over a copy of the report to each opposition party leader?

Sponsorship Program
Oral Questions

2:15 p.m.

LaSalle—Émard
Québec

Liberal

Paul Martin Prime Minister

Mr. Speaker, with a report of this importance, governments are always given a copy first, because they have to take action.

The precedents are clear, as I have said. In the case of the Somalia inquiry, the government received the report three days ahead of time. In the case of the Krever inquiry on contaminated blood, the government received the report five days ahead of time. In the case of the Commission on Aboriginal Peoples, it was 20 days.

In this particular case, the government has given itself the shortest time period: 12 hours.

Aboriginal Affairs
Oral Questions

2:20 p.m.

Calgary Southwest
Alberta

Conservative

Stephen Harper Leader of the Opposition

Mr. Speaker, the Prime Minister made a promise to do things differently from Mr. Chrétien. But here he is, behaving the same way.

I have a supplementary on a different question. I want to return to our national embarrassment, the failure of the government to provide aboriginal Canadians with clean drinking water, despite spending $2.5 billion in 12 years.

In an article today, Senator Grafstein tells the world that the Liberal caucus has known about the extent of this problem since 2001. When did the Prime Minister find out?