House of Commons Hansard #151 of the 38th Parliament, 1st Session. (The original version is on Parliament's site.) The word of the day was strategy.

Topics

Committees of the House
Routine Proceedings

3:15 p.m.

Liberal

John Maloney Welland, ON

Mr. Speaker, I have the honour to present, in both official languages, the 17th report of the Standing Committee on Justice, Human Rights, Public Safety and Emergency Preparedness.

In accordance with its order of reference of Wednesday, September 28 your committee has considered Bill C-53, an act to amend the Criminal Code (proceeds of crime) and the Controlled Drugs and Substances Act and to make consequential amendments to another act and agreed on Tuesday, November 15 to report it without amendment.

Committees of the House
Routine Proceedings

3:15 p.m.

Liberal

Roger Gallaway Sarnia—Lambton, ON

Mr. Speaker, I have the honour to present, in both officials languages, the sixth report of the Standing Committee on Transport.

In accordance with its order of reference of Thursday, October 27, your committee has considered votes 1a, 5a, 10a, 20a, 35a and 40a under Transport in the supplementary estimates (A), 2005-06, for the fiscal year ending March 31, 2006, and reports the same.

Committees of the House
Routine Proceedings

3:15 p.m.

Conservative

Dave Chatters Westlock—St. Paul, AB

Mr. Speaker, I have the honour to present, in both official languages, the sixth report of the Standing Committee on Access to Information, Privacy and Ethics.

The committee has studied the supplementary estimates for the fiscal year ending March 31, 2006 and has agreed to report them without amendment.

Committees of the House
Routine Proceedings

3:15 p.m.

Liberal

Marlene Catterall Ottawa West—Nepean, ON

Mr. Speaker, I have the honour to present, in both official languages, the 17th report of the Standing Committee on Canadian Heritage.

Pursuant to Standing Order 108(2), your committee has considered the recent Canadian Broadcasting Corporation lockout and has agreed to report to the House its recommendations.

Income Tax Act
Routine Proceedings

3:15 p.m.

Conservative

Dave Chatters Westlock—St. Paul, AB

moved for leave to introduce Bill C-445, An Act to amend the Income Tax Act (female presumption in child care).

Mr. Speaker, I am pleased to introduce this private member's bill. The intent is to remove the female presumption in child care for purposes of the Canada child tax benefit within the Income Tax Act. The act should be gender neutral in this case and leave it up to the parents to decide to whom the benefit should be paid.

I have a constituent who is the father of two children. He has a court order providing legal custody, and he is divorced. Recently he has become involved in a common law relationship and Revenue Canada now says that the child tax benefit must be sent to the common law partner, despite the father having a court order saying that the kids are his responsibility, and the fact that the common law partner has agreed that the father is the primary caregiver.

The Income Tax Act needs to be changed to follow court rulings.

(Motions deemed adopted, bill read the first time and printed)

Development Assistance Conditions and Accountability Act
Routine Proceedings

3:15 p.m.

Independent

Bev Desjarlais Churchill, MB

moved for leave to introduce Bill C-446, An Act respecting the provision of development assistance by the Canadian International Development Agency and other federal bodies.

Mr. Speaker, this bill is intended to provide a legislative mandate for the Canadian International Development Agency, a mandate with the central focus on poverty reduction and in a manner consistent with Canadian values, Canadian foreign policy and international human rights standards.

The legislation would improve transparency and accountability.

(Motions deemed adopted, bill read the first time and printed)

Criminal Code
Routine Proceedings

3:20 p.m.

Liberal

Massimo Pacetti Saint-Léonard—Saint-Michel, QC

moved for leave to introduce Bill C-447, An Act to amend the Criminal Code (use of hand-held cellular telephone while operating a motor vehicle).

Mr. Speaker, how many times have we narrowly escaped an accident on a road? It has happened to us all. More and more it seems that when we look over our shoulder at the offending driver, we see him or her chatting away on their cellular phone. This is an offence of which more than a few of us have been guilty.

Today, I am proud to introduce in the House this bill to amend the Criminal Code of Canada with regard to cell phone use during the operation of a motor vehicle. This enactment amends the Criminal Code to make it an offence to use a hand-held cellular telephone while operating a motor vehicle on a highway.

This private member's bill is quite simple and aims to stop people from taking this unnecessary risk that endangers innocent lives.

The amendment would still allow for the use of cellular phones that are used with an external speaker or with an earpiece and microphone, but it would try to halt the growing trend of convenience and lifestyle habits taking precedence over public safety on Canadian roads.

Criminal Code
Routine Proceedings

3:20 p.m.

The Speaker

There is a lot of enthusiasm for an amendment to ban the telephones in the House as well.

(Motions deemed adopted, bill read the first time and printed)

Committees of the House
Routine Proceedings

November 16th, 2005 / 3:20 p.m.

Liberal

Karen Redman Kitchener Centre, ON

Mr. Speaker, discussions have taken place among all parties concerning the recorded division scheduled to take place later today on the motion to concur in the eighth report of the Standing Committee on Industry, Natural Resources, Science and Technology, requesting an extension of time to consider Bill C-281. I believe you would find consent for the following motion. I move:

That the recorded division scheduled to take place later today on the motion to concur in the eighth report of the Standing Committee on Industry, Natural Resources, Science and Technology, be deemed concurred in.

Committees of the House
Routine Proceedings

3:20 p.m.

The Speaker

Does the hon. chief government whip have the unanimous consent of the House to propose this motion?

Committees of the House
Routine Proceedings

3:20 p.m.

Some hon. members

Agreed.

Committees of the House
Routine Proceedings

3:20 p.m.

The Speaker

Is it the pleasure of the House to adopt the motion?

Committees of the House
Routine Proceedings

3:20 p.m.

Some hon. members

Agreed.

(Motion agreed to)

Petitions
Routine Proceedings

3:20 p.m.

Conservative

Steven Fletcher Charleswood—St. James, MB

Mr. Speaker, it is an honour for me today to present a petition signed by hundreds of Manitobans on autism spectrum disorder. The petition calls for more research to be brought forward to help these children.

Petitions
Routine Proceedings

3:20 p.m.

Liberal

Paddy Torsney Burlington, ON

Mr. Speaker, I have three petitions to table. The first petition is to protect the freeze expansion and new quarry permits on the Niagara escarpment.