House of Commons Hansard #153 of the 38th Parliament, 1st Session. (The original version is on Parliament's site.) The word of the day was seniors.

Topics

Aboriginal Affairs
Oral Questions

11:30 a.m.

Conservative

Helena Guergis Simcoe—Grey, ON

No, Mr. Speaker, that just is not good enough. We have an opportunity next week to address this important issue.

The lack of action and support for women and children in crisis situations is appalling and the Liberal government, after a decade of federal-provincial meetings, has a lot of nerve blaming anyone else but itself for this problem.

Why will the government not take immediate action to address the problem and assign someone other than this incompetent minister who clearly has no idea that he is even responsible for the file?

Aboriginal Affairs
Oral Questions

11:30 a.m.

London West
Ontario

Liberal

Sue Barnes Parliamentary Secretary to the Minister of Indian Affairs and Northern Development and Federal Interlocutor for Métis and Non-Status Indians

Mr. Speaker, I would like to report to the member opposite that the first ministers' meeting, the first one that will deal with health, housing, education, economic development and strengthening relationships, those things are vehicles for dealing with the issue.

Nineteen groups fed into the agenda last June; the leadership, the provinces, the territories and our government. We will do our job. The Native Women's Advisory Committee, NWAC, was talking to our minister yesterday on this subject. She knows things that the opposition cannot even understand.

Softwood Lumber
Oral Questions

11:30 a.m.

Bloc

Sébastien Gagnon Jonquière—Alma, QC

Mr. Speaker, the Prime Minister's softwood lumber strategy merely consists in criticizing the Americans' attitude abroad, while neglecting the plight of our domestic industry. Yet, Tembec's CEO underlined his company's difficulties in borrowing money from the banks because of the government's refusal to provide loan guarantees, as it could, through Export Development Canada, for example.

Will the minister continue to ignore this plea by the softwood industry, which is fighting for its survival? What is he waiting for to provide loan guarantees, as the industry has been asking for?

Softwood Lumber
Oral Questions

11:30 a.m.

Brossard—La Prairie
Québec

Liberal

Jacques Saada Minister of the Economic Development Agency of Canada for the Regions of Quebec and Minister responsible for the Francophonie

Mr. Speaker, first, the Prime Minister is making all necessary efforts to ensure that the United States respects the rule of law. Second, as regards helping businesses, the idea of providing loan guarantees deserves to be examined, based on the impact that such a measure would have on the entire industry. We must find a way to help the industry as a whole. This is what we are working on.

Softwood Lumber
Oral Questions

11:30 a.m.

Bloc

Sébastien Gagnon Jonquière—Alma, QC

Mr. Speaker, for Tembec alone, we are talking about $320 million in countervailing and anti-dumping duties that are lying dormant in the United States.

Can the government assure us that the plan it has been announcing for the past three years, which, incidentally, does not require any legislation to take effect, will include enough loan guarantees to compensate companies for all the duties that are unfairly being kept by Washington?

Softwood Lumber
Oral Questions

11:30 a.m.

Brossard—La Prairie
Québec

Liberal

Jacques Saada Minister of the Economic Development Agency of Canada for the Regions of Quebec and Minister responsible for the Francophonie

Mr. Speaker, we are working on this complex issue with a view to determine what would be best for the public and the affected industries. We are not here to engage in propaganda and find simplistic solutions to complex issues. I would ask the member to show some patience. He will see that the work we are doing is much more comprehensive than anything he can ever do.

International Trade
Oral Questions

11:35 a.m.

Bloc

Odina Desrochers Lotbinière—Chutes-de-la-Chaudière, QC

Mr. Speaker, in response to a question by my colleague from Berthier—Maskinongé on October 20 as to whether he intended to follow through with the conclusions of the Canadian International Trade Tribunal, which recommended that the government apply safeguards to protect Canadian bicycle manufacturers facing competition from China, the Parliamentary Secretary to the Minister of International Trade was evasive.

I ask him once again whether the government plans to act on these recommendations and impose safeguards.

International Trade
Oral Questions

11:35 a.m.

Wascana
Saskatchewan

Liberal

Ralph Goodale Minister of Finance

Mr. Speaker, the hon. gentleman knows the normal procedure here. The government is following that procedure. We have the matter under consideration. We will make a decision in the best interests of Canadians just as quickly as we can.

International Trade
Oral Questions

11:35 a.m.

Bloc

Odina Desrochers Lotbinière—Chutes-de-la-Chaudière, QC

Mr. Speaker, I would remind the minister that the tribunal tabled its decision in September and concluded that the rapid increase in imports of bicycles under $400 threatened the survival of the Canadian bicycle industry.

Is this an example of government impotence, as has been the case with clothing, textiles, shoes and softwood lumber, or will the minister finally decide to do something and save the bicycle industry and the 800 jobs it generates in Quebec?

International Trade
Oral Questions

11:35 a.m.

Wascana
Saskatchewan

Liberal

Ralph Goodale Minister of Finance

Mr. Speaker, the government always acts in the Canadian public interest. We will weigh all of the factors. Of course, one of those factors that will be very important is the opinion of the CITT. We will report to the House on further developments as quickly as we can.

Aboriginal Affairs
Oral Questions

November 18th, 2005 / 11:35 a.m.

Conservative

James Bezan Selkirk—Interlake, MB

Mr. Speaker, we have a terrible election scandal involving vote buying, influence peddling and election rigging, but for once this does not directly involve the Liberal Party of Canada.

During the last three band council elections on Manitoba's Peguis First Nation reserve, voters have been intimidated, bribed and defrauded. Mail-in ballots were illegally purchased. Others were stolen from the post office. All of this has been declared by over 270 band members.

Why has the Minister of Indian Affairs not intervened to ensure that democracy is preserved in our first nation communities?

Aboriginal Affairs
Oral Questions

11:35 a.m.

London West
Ontario

Liberal

Sue Barnes Parliamentary Secretary to the Minister of Indian Affairs and Northern Development and Federal Interlocutor for Métis and Non-Status Indians

Mr. Speaker, the investigator has completed his investigation. Officials of the department have received the report and are currently reviewing it. We take this process very seriously. We need to ensure that we have reviewed all the documents and information prior to making a decision.

The department is committed to working with first nations to strengthen their governments' procedures, including elections. We will do so because we know that in this country our future is dependent on having good relationships and giving all of the support that is needed to raise the democracy--

Aboriginal Affairs
Oral Questions

11:35 a.m.

The Speaker

The hon. member for Selkirk--Interlake.

Aboriginal Affairs
Oral Questions

11:35 a.m.

Conservative

James Bezan Selkirk—Interlake, MB

Mr. Speaker, if the Liberals are serious about that, they would not have scrapped the Indian governance act.

The Peguis First Nation for Democracy requested the RCMP and INAC to investigate the past two elections. The first investigation is just coming out now and found election irregularities, yet the same chief is still in power today and has continued with the same practices to win the last election in March by only 29 votes.

The government makes phony claims about fixing the democratic deficit and improving accountability. People in first nations communities deserve better. The minister was made aware of this months ago and has done absolutely nothing about fixing the problem that is on the reserve right now.

Aboriginal Affairs
Oral Questions

11:35 a.m.

London West
Ontario

Liberal

Sue Barnes Parliamentary Secretary to the Minister of Indian Affairs and Northern Development and Federal Interlocutor for Métis and Non-Status Indians

Mr. Speaker, we have no lessons to learn from those members opposite. The first nations councils appoint an electoral officer who is responsible for administering the general band election. Any first nations elector or candidate may appeal an election held under the Indian Act. Once an appeal is filed, all candidates and electoral officers receive a copy and are provided with an opportunity to respond to any allegations.

If the information received is not sufficient to make a determination, an investigator can be appointed to conduct further investigation. This minister has followed procedure.