House of Commons Hansard #156 of the 38th Parliament, 1st Session. (The original version is on Parliament's site.) The word of the day was first.

Topics

Taxation
Oral Questions

3 p.m.

Liberal

Ruby Dhalla Brampton—Springdale, ON

Mr. Speaker, Canadians from coast to coast are working day in and day out to build a better future for themselves, their children and their families.

In the economic and fiscal update, the government has promised to lower personal taxes for low and modest income Canadian families. Could the Minister of Finance please tell this House what this tax reduction that has been announced will mean to a Canadian family of four with a modest income?

Taxation
Oral Questions

3 p.m.

Wascana
Saskatchewan

Liberal

Ralph Goodale Minister of Finance

Mr. Speaker, we are increasing the basic exemptions and we are reducing personal tax rates. For the average Canadian family of four earning $60,000, that will mean initially a saving of about 20%. It will mean ultimately, at the end of five years, a saving of 33% or a cumulative saving over that period of time of $3,300.

At the same time, we are investing in learning and skills and in innovation and trade. We are producing higher disposable incomes, a better standard of living and a stronger Canadian quality of life. That is what good government is all about.

Justice
Oral Questions

3 p.m.

Conservative

Russ Hiebert South Surrey—White Rock—Cloverdale, BC

Mr. Speaker, Robert Osbourne, the “bait car” auto thief, was convicted in June of this past year, yet he is eligible for parole as early as this December. He is supposedly serving four years for a string of auto thefts and a reckless high speed chase. He exceeded speeds of 140 kilometres an hour in residential areas.

There have already been 11 deaths related to auto theft in B.C. this year. When will the justice minister stand up and stop parole for dangerous criminals? Why does four years mean only six months in the Liberal soft on crime justice system?

Justice
Oral Questions

3 p.m.

Mount Royal
Québec

Liberal

Irwin Cotler Minister of Justice and Attorney General of Canada

Mr. Speaker, when we tabled the legislation with respect to conditional sentence reform, which regrettably we have not been able to get adopted, we made it clear that there will be no conditional sentences with regard to those who are engaged in those kinds of serious auto offences. We have also introduced legislation with respect to making street racing an aggravated offence. There have been a number of initiatives. If the opposition would have joined us in passing those initiatives, we would be combating those kinds of auto injuries and deaths.

Correctional Service of Canada
Oral Questions

3 p.m.

Conservative

Mark Warawa Langley, BC

Mr. Speaker, Correctional Service of Canada officials have quietly hired handlers to follow released pedophiles everywhere they go. Two pedophiles in British Columbia who recently completed their jail sentences are considered extremely dangerous predators who will assault children again if left unsupervised. Most halfway houses in B.C. have rejected them as being too risky. It is absurd to think that they can successfully track pedophiles 24/7.

Why is the Liberal government putting children at risk by releasing extremely dangerous pedophiles into our communities?

Correctional Service of Canada
Oral Questions

3 p.m.

Edmonton Centre
Alberta

Liberal

Anne McLellan Deputy Prime Minister and Minister of Public Safety and Emergency Preparedness

Mr. Speaker, I am sure the hon. member understands that if an accused person who is incarcerated has reached his warrant expiry date, there is absolutely no legal way that we can continue to hold him in a federal prison.

In fact, the police in the local jurisdiction can seek a section 810 order. Local prosecutors can, obviously at an earlier stage in the process, seek to have the person declared either a dangerous or a long term offender, but that has to be done at the time of the conviction and sentencing. Therefore, I think the--

Correctional Service of Canada
Oral Questions

3:05 p.m.

The Speaker

The hon. member for Rimouski-Neigette--Témiscouata--Les Basques.

Pointe-au-Père Wharf
Oral Questions

3:05 p.m.

Bloc

Louise Thibault Rimouski—Témiscouata, QC

Mr. Speaker, Transport Canada is responsible for the wharves it still owns. When human safety is at risk, work must be done as promptly as possible because any delay constitutes a real danger, even when a wharf has been declared out of service. That is the case with the Pointe-au-Père wharf, which is a threat to the community. Any delay is unacceptable and if the minister does not believe me, I have pictures that clearly illustrate my concerns.

Can the Minister of Transport tell us when the Pointe-au-Père wharf will be filled in with rock and made safe?

Pointe-au-Père Wharf
Oral Questions

3:05 p.m.

Outremont
Québec

Liberal

Jean Lapierre Minister of Transport

Mr. Speaker, obviously wharves that are no longer used for fishing or commercial purposes and that have no takers in the community eventually have to be filled in with rock, as does the Pointe-au-Père wharf. We must do this as soon as possible. Unfortunately, eventually we must get rid of it for good. Then, over time, nature will take care of cleaning up the shore. This will be taken care of as soon as possible.

Public Service
Oral Questions

3:05 p.m.

Liberal

Marc Godbout Ottawa—Orléans, ON

Mr. Speaker, constituents in my riding are concerned about the under-representation of visible minorities in the federal public service, government agencies or as appointees on boards of crown corporations. What action does the President of the Treasury Board intend or plan to take to correct this situation?

Public Service
Oral Questions

3:05 p.m.

Winnipeg South
Manitoba

Liberal

Reg Alcock President of the Treasury Board and Minister responsible for the Canadian Wheat Board

Mr. Speaker, I wish to assure the member that the Prime Minister and this side of the House are absolutely committed to a public service that reflects the face of Canada. I can inform him that in three of the four categories we have met or exceeded our targets. In the final category, we are working hard to close the gap with the assistance of this member and the members for Notre-Dame-de-Grâce—Lachine, Etobicoke--Lakeshore and Brampton--Springdale.

Presence in Gallery
Oral Questions

3:05 p.m.

The Speaker

I would like to draw to the attention of hon. members the presence in the gallery of the winners of the 2005 Governor General's Literary Awards: M. Michel Bock, Mme. Isabelle Arsenault, Mme. Geneviève Billette, M. Camille Bouchard, Mr. David Gilmour, Mr. Rob Gonsalves, Ms. Anne Compton, M. Jean-Marc Desgent, Mr. John Mighton, Mme. Rachel Martinez, Mrs. Pamela Porter, Mr. Fred A. Reed, Mr. John Vaillant, and Ms. Aki Shimazaki.

Presence in Gallery
Oral Questions

3:05 p.m.

Some hon. members

Hear, hear!

Canada's Performance 2005
Routine Proceedings

3:05 p.m.

Winnipeg South
Manitoba

Liberal

Reg Alcock President of the Treasury Board and Minister responsible for the Canadian Wheat Board

Mr. Speaker, as part of our commitment to improve transparency and accountability to parliamentarians and Canadians, I have the honour to table, in both official languages, a report entitled “Canada’s Performance 2005: The Government of Canada’s Contribution”, on behalf of the people of Canada.

Air-India
Routine Proceedings

3:05 p.m.

Etobicoke North
Ontario

Liberal

Roy Cullen Parliamentary Secretary to the Minister of Public Safety and Emergency Preparedness

Mr. Speaker, I am pleased to table, in both official languages, a report entitled “Lessons to be Learned”, as completed by the hon. Bob Rae. This report advises the federal government on outstanding questions with respect to the bombing of Air-India flight 182.

On behalf of the Deputy Prime Minister, I want to thank Mr. Rae and his team for their excellent work on this report.