House of Commons Hansard #157 of the 38th Parliament, 1st Session. (The original version is on Parliament's site.) The word of the day was liberal.

Topics

Softwood Lumber
Oral Questions

2:40 p.m.

Outremont
Québec

Liberal

Jean Lapierre Minister of Transport

Mr. Speaker, as we speak, our ministers are in the process of announcing a major program to help the forestry industry. It comprises not only loan guarantees in the order of some $800 million, but also $215 million for innovative processing technology, $150 million to help communities adapt, and a considerable amount to expand current markets for lumber products, enhance skill levels and support bioenergy. This is a complete program providing complete support to the forest industry.

Softwood Lumber
Oral Questions

2:40 p.m.

Bloc

Paul Crête Rivière-Du-Loup—Montmagny, QC

Mr. Speaker, in addition to insufficient loan guarantees, the government's plan says nothing about assuming the legal fees incurred by the companies and associations in the softwood lumber conflict.

Can the minister confirm that the commitment announced by the government last April still holds and that he will be sending a letter of intent on this to the industry associations so that the money will be available, whether or not there is an election?

Softwood Lumber
Oral Questions

2:40 p.m.

Outremont
Québec

Liberal

Jean Lapierre Minister of Transport

Certainly, Mr. Speaker. The government is true to its word. It has made a commitment to help the industry in its legal battle with the United States. Unlike the Bloc Québécois members who do nothing but talk, we will deliver the goods, because we are in a position to do so. They have nothing but questions. We have the answers.

Canada Revenue Agency
Oral Questions

2:40 p.m.

Conservative

Brian Pallister Portage—Lisgar, MB

Mr. Speaker, this week, Auditor General Sheila Fraser reported that the number of Canadians who cheat on their taxes has doubled in the last five years. She also noted that the Canada Revenue Agency does not understand why. Perhaps it does, it just cannot say.

When the Liberal Party engages in contract giveaways and kickback schemes, no charges are laid. When Liberal patronage appointee André Ouellet spends wildly without receipts, no audit is made public.

Would the Prime Minister agree with me that not all Canadians who cheat on their taxes are Liberals, they are just acting like Liberals?

Canada Revenue Agency
Oral Questions

2:40 p.m.

Wascana
Saskatchewan

Liberal

Ralph Goodale Minister of Finance

Mr. Speaker, that type of question is really beneath contempt.

The Canada Revenue Agency is administering the tax rules of this country in a fair and equitable manner. It tries to be efficient and effective in the work that it does. On the other issues, no one in this country is above the law and the government will ensure that that is in fact the case.

Canada Revenue Agency
Oral Questions

2:40 p.m.

Conservative

Brian Pallister Portage—Lisgar, MB

Mr. Speaker, what is beneath contempt is the conduct of the government and it is time it was thrown out.

More Canadians than ever are cheating on their taxes and no wonder. Take a look at the legacy of waste: gun registry, boondoggle, André Ouellet, Dingwall's entitlements, sponsorship scandal, kickbacks, and now vote-buying in record numbers. To top it off, Canadians see a multimillionaire Prime Minister using offshore tax havens to dodge paying his own taxes.

Is the finance minister the last Canadian who does not understand why taxpayers are saying, “Liberals do not pay their taxes. Why should I pay mine?”

Canada Revenue Agency
Oral Questions

2:40 p.m.

Wascana
Saskatchewan

Liberal

Ralph Goodale Minister of Finance

Mr. Speaker, what a crock of unmitigated horse feathers.

Let us look at the record. From its peak at 68% of GDP when the Conservatives were in office, Canada's debt ratio today stands at just 38%. It is on its way to 25% and then 20% within 15 years. Our debt load when those people across the way were in office was the second worst in the G-7. Today it is the very best. The proportion of our debt that was in foreign hands when they were in office, 43%. Today it is just 15%.

That party drove this country into the ground.

Ethics
Oral Questions

November 24th, 2005 / 2:40 p.m.

Conservative

Jeff Watson Essex, ON

Mr. Speaker, an unprecedented number of the Prime Minister's friends have benefited from the Liberal culture of entitlement. He ushered his Liberal pals into the Senate, including Art Eggleton, whose ethics apparently were not good enough even for Jean Chrétien. He is negotiating severance with Liberal David Dingwall. He appointed defeated Liberal candidate Glen Murray to a plum patronage job against the wishes of the House.

Will the Prime Minister finally admit what Canadians know well? The Liberal culture of entitlement thrives in his government.

Ethics
Oral Questions

2:45 p.m.

Kings—Hants
Nova Scotia

Liberal

Scott Brison Minister of Public Works and Government Services

Mr. Speaker, the fact is Justice Gomery said that under the previous Conservative government it was impossible for firms that were not Conservative related to get any advertising contracts.

Further, this government and the Prime Minister have done more to end this kind of activity, to ensure that Canadians have open, transparent and accountable government than any prime minister in the history of Canada.

I am proud, we are proud to sit with the Prime Minister defending the interests of Canadians and not throwing mud on everyone involved in the political process like that party is doing.

Ethics
Oral Questions

2:45 p.m.

Conservative

Jeff Watson Essex, ON

Mr. Speaker, the Liberal crony and patronage deserves the same electoral defeat that the Conservatives got in 1993.

The Prime Minister's ethical deficit reaches a new low every day. Liberal hack David Herle received an untendered contract to write the Liberal election platform. A Liberal pollster received a verbal contract for taxpayer dollars. Liberal David Dingwall will receive a golden handshake on top of his $350,000 illegal lobbying commission.

Will the Prime Minister finally admit that patronage, cronyism and a culture of entitlement are alive and well in his Liberal government?

Ethics
Oral Questions

2:45 p.m.

Wascana
Saskatchewan

Liberal

Ralph Goodale Minister of Finance

Mr. Speaker, the hon. gentleman's allegations are simply untrue. We can go through the points that he raised in his preamble and refute them one by one. On one for example, he referred to a particular contract that was let fully within the rules and it was fully published on the Internet before those folks across the way had even read the morning newspaper.

Canada Elections Act
Oral Questions

2:45 p.m.

Liberal

Mark Holland Ajax—Pickering, ON

Mr. Speaker, yesterday in the House the deputy leader of the government tabled legislation that would limit contributions for election advertising by third parties.

Could the minister update the House as to whether progress has been made to seek unanimous consent from the opposition to pass this important legislation?

Canada Elections Act
Oral Questions

2:45 p.m.

Ottawa—Vanier
Ontario

Liberal

Mauril Bélanger Minister for Internal Trade

Mr. Speaker, unfortunately, the opposition has refused to let the House deal with this legislation immediately. While disappointing, it is not surprising given that the Leader of the Opposition has spent a good chunk of his career trying to allow unlimited spending by third parties. In essence, the opposition refused to shut the door to U.S.-style political action committees.

Given that the bill will not become law, will the leader of the official opposition rescind his commitment to allow anyone to spend unlimited amounts of money to unduly influence the electoral process?

International Cooperation
Oral Questions

2:45 p.m.

NDP

Alexa McDonough Halifax, NS

Mr. Speaker, the Liberals wonder why Canadians call them morally bankrupt and democratically deficient. In a unanimous vote in June, Parliament called on the Prime Minister to deliver on our 0.7% obligation for international development assistance. Despite their $20 billion spending binge, there is not one red cent for international development assistance.

Could the government explain why?

International Cooperation
Oral Questions

2:45 p.m.

Wascana
Saskatchewan

Liberal

Ralph Goodale Minister of Finance

Mr. Speaker, the fact of the matter is that in the budget in February we increased our foreign aid commitment by $3.4 billion which was the largest increase ever. That was later increased in the summer by another $500 million. We are investing $342 million in a variety of programs to assist in health improvements in Africa; $500 million to focus on peace and security; and we are also investing in the work at Doha to try to get a trade result in the international trade talks that will be friendly to the lesser developed countries of this world.