House of Commons Hansard #65 of the 38th Parliament, 1st Session. (The original version is on Parliament's site.) The word of the day was students.

Topics

Gasoline Industry
Oral Question Period

11:40 a.m.

Chatham-Kent—Essex
Ontario

Liberal

Jerry Pickard Parliamentary Secretary to the Minister of Industry

Mr. Speaker, first, I want to congratulate the member for Thunder Bay—Rainy River. Last year he organized a task force to look at gasoline prices in his area and, quite frankly, across the north. He did a marvellous job there.

He has, on a regular basis, contacted the minister and talked about gasoline prices. Very properly, he is asking about the Competition Act today. It will be more effective in dealing with corporations and dealing with unfair practices that happen in this country. That is one of the reasons that we are trying to move the Competition Act forward.

Through monetary penalties, we will make sure that corporations that treat others unjustly--

Gasoline Industry
Oral Question Period

11:40 a.m.

The Speaker

The hon. member for Vancouver East.

Housing
Oral Question Period

11:40 a.m.

NDP

Libby Davies Vancouver East, BC

Mr. Speaker, what does the Prime Minister say to the 1.7 million Canadian households that desperately need affordable housing? What does he say to homeless people around the streets? What does he say to aboriginal people off reserve?

In his rush for Conservative support, he betrayed them and there is anger and outrage that he broke his own promise for $1.5 billion for housing while rewarding his corporate buddies.

I challenge him to get out on the street at night, experience the impact of what he has done and then think about his corporate tax cuts. Is he willing to take that responsibility and see what he has done?

Housing
Oral Question Period

11:45 a.m.

Fredericton
New Brunswick

Liberal

Andy Scott Minister of Indian Affairs and Northern Development and Federal Interlocutor for Métis and Non-Status Indians

Mr. Speaker, the promise of $1.5 billion in new housing will be kept. That was repeated in the throne speech.

The reality is that money that is available now, about $800 million, has simply not been spent.

On the question of first nations housing, we have a round table process in place. It is slated to come to a conclusion this spring. The Minister of Finance has acknowledge that we will need more money and we will get it.

Education
Oral Question Period

11:45 a.m.

NDP

Alexa McDonough Halifax, NS

Mr. Speaker, the government's stall on education funding over the past decade has caused the doubling of tuition and crippling student debt loads.

Grubbing for youth votes in the spring election, the Prime Minister promised to restore $8 billion to $9 billion to educational core funding. Yesterday's budget did no such thing.

Education core funding remains below the 1995 level. There is no tuition relief and students have to either die or become permanently disabled in order to qualify for debt relief.

Why the betrayal of Canada's students of yesterday, today and tomorrow?

Education
Oral Question Period

11:45 a.m.

Winnipeg South
Manitoba

Liberal

Reg Alcock President of the Treasury Board and Minister responsible for the Canadian Wheat Board

Mr. Speaker, if the member took the time to read the budget, she would understand that there has been no such betrayal at all.

In fact, coming out of the previous budget, there is the new Canada learning bond for low income families, an enhanced Canada education savings grant for low and middle income families, new upfront grants of $2,000 for students with disabilities and $3,000 for first year students from low income communities.

She might want to speak to Premier Doer of the province of Manitoba, who has congratulated the Prime Minister and the finance minister for keeping their promises.

Correctional Service Canada
Oral Question Period

February 25th, 2005 / 11:45 a.m.

Conservative

James Bezan Selkirk—Interlake, MB

Mr. Speaker, recent media reports state that Stoney Mountain Penitentiary just ranked third out of 54 federal prisons for weapon seizures.

Corrections officers confiscated nearly 1,200 weapons across Canada during 2004. Corrections officers put their lives at risk every day but the government will not supply them with stabproof vests. As well, the government has continually delayed coming to an agreement with the officers union. They have now been without a contract for three years.

When will the dithering government settle this matter and make sure our corrections officers work in safe conditions while being compensated properly.

Correctional Service Canada
Oral Question Period

11:45 a.m.

Mount Royal
Québec

Liberal

Irwin Cotler Minister of Justice and Attorney General of Canada

Mr. Speaker, the safety of the corrections officers as well as the safety of this country continues to be a priority and will remain that way.

Justice
Oral Question Period

11:45 a.m.

Conservative

Gary Goodyear Cambridge, ON

Mr. Speaker, Albert Walker stole millions of dollars from the hardworking people in my area.

While on the run in Britain with his 15 year old daughter posing as his wife, he murdered Ronald Platt and took his identity. His family is terrified and they do not want him back here.

When the Deputy Prime Minister signed for his transfer back to Canada, she showed sympathy for the murderer and disdain for the family.

Will the minister assure the family that this murderer will not end up within 2,000 miles of them?

Justice
Oral Question Period

11:45 a.m.

Mount Royal
Québec

Liberal

Irwin Cotler Minister of Justice and Attorney General of Canada

Mr. Speaker, as the hon. member is aware, I cannot comment on the specifics of an offender's case.

However, the International Transfer of Offenders Act enables Canadian offenders, who are convicted abroad, to serve their sentence in their country of citizenship whenever a treaty has been signed to that effect. That has been the case in this instance.

Child Care
Oral Question Period

11:45 a.m.

Conservative

Maurice Vellacott Saskatoon—Wanuskewin, SK

Mr. Speaker, in a recent Vanier Institute study, day care centres rank a distant fifth when Canadians are asked who they would prefer to care for their preschool children. A parent, grandparent, another relative and home day care all ranked higher. Even in Quebec, which has a day care program of the kind that the Liberals plan to introduce, most parents would prefer to have children cared for by a relative.

Conservative Party policy would allow parents to make their own child care choices. Why do the Liberals continue to promote a plan that discriminates against the preferred choices of 75% of Canadian parents?

Child Care
Oral Question Period

11:45 a.m.

Trinity—Spadina
Ontario

Liberal

Tony Ianno Minister of State (Families and Caregivers)

Mr. Speaker, as was stated in the election platform, we are investing $5 billion toward early learning child centres. We are working with the provinces. The finance minister put the commitment in place, and we will continue to work with the provincial and territorial governments to ensure that all children have the opportunity to be productive citizens in the future.

The Environment
Oral Question Period

11:50 a.m.

Conservative

Joe Preston Elgin—Middlesex—London, ON

Mr. Speaker, it has been reported that the Kyoto Keystone Kops are again abusing automakers. Auto manufacturers are being handed all the work in changing consumer behaviour in order to achieve artificial emission and fuel economy targets by 2010.

Does the minister realize that this could lead to catastrophic job losses, while making little difference in emission and fuel economy levels? If the Minister of the Environment cannot write his own Kyoto plan, why is he forcing the auto manufacturers to do his work for him?

The Environment
Oral Question Period

11:50 a.m.

Avalon
Newfoundland & Labrador

Liberal

R. John Efford Minister of Natural Resources

Mr. Speaker, the Minister of the Environment, the Minister of Industry and myself have had several weeks of ongoing discussions with the auto industry. In negotiations from day to day there are always things that will come up on which there will have to be a further agreement.

I have full confidence that at the end of the day we will work out an agreement to the satisfaction of the auto industry and to the environment and government.

International Assistance
Oral Question Period

11:50 a.m.

Bloc

Roger Clavet Louis-Hébert, QC

Mr. Speaker, the Canadian government's contribution to international assistance is more than disappointing, to say the least. Canada has dropped from 6th to 12th place among the contributing nations. Unfortunately, the budget has not changed matters.

At the rate he is increasing budgets for international assistance, will the Prime Minister admit that it will take Canada 30 years to reach its target of 0.7% of GDP for international assistance and not 10 years by 2015, as it promised the United Nations?