House of Commons Hansard #83 of the 38th Parliament, 1st Session. (The original version is on Parliament's site.) The word of the day was budget.

Topics

Petitions
Routine Proceedings

12:15 p.m.

Conservative

Loyola Hearn St. John's South, NL

Mr. Speaker, in light of the concerns being expressed about the condition of rural post offices and the future of such entities, I am pleased to present a petition from the residents of Cappahayden in the great province of Newfoundland and Labrador.

The petitioners call upon the government to ensure that the rural post office in Cappahayden is kept open to serve the resident users.

Petitions
Routine Proceedings

12:15 p.m.

Conservative

Scott Reid Lanark—Frontenac—Lennox and Addington, ON

Mr. Speaker, I have nine petitions all on the same subject and which were circulated among churches in my constituency, for example, the Church of The Annunciation in Enterprise, the Evangel Temple in Napanee, and other churches in Smiths Falls, Carleton Place and Lanark Highlands.

In each petition the petitioners pray that Parliament retain the traditional definition of marriage as between one man and one woman to the exclusion of all others. The petitioners point out that marriage is the best foundation for raising families and children. They point out that this is the point of view of most Canadians.

Questions On The Order Paper
Routine Proceedings

12:15 p.m.

Northumberland—Quinte West
Ontario

Liberal

Paul MacKlin Parliamentary Secretary to the Minister of Justice and Attorney General of Canada

Mr. Speaker, the following questions will be answered today: Nos. 99, 105 and 106.

Questions On The Order Paper
Routine Proceedings

12:15 p.m.

The Deputy Speaker

Is that agreed?

Questions On The Order Paper
Routine Proceedings

12:15 p.m.

Some hon. members

Agreed.

Question No. 99
Routine Proceedings

12:15 p.m.

Conservative

Ken Epp Edmonton—Sherwood Park, AB

What differences are there between the policies for the imposition of entry fees on golfers wishing to golf at the course in Elk Island National Park and the course in Fundy National Park, and why do any differences in policies exist?

Question No. 99
Routine Proceedings

12:15 p.m.

Saint-Laurent—Cartierville
Québec

Liberal

Stéphane Dion Minister of the Environment

Mr. Speaker, in both cases, park entry and green fees are charged. In Elk Island National Park of Canada, the minister sets the entry fees, which are collected at the entry gate. However, the golf course is operated independently by a lessee, who sets the green fees and collects them at the pro shop. In Fundy National Park of Canada, Parks Canada operates the golf course. Consequently, the minister sets both the entry and the green fees, which are packaged together and collected at the pro shop on behalf of the Crown.

Question No. 105
Routine Proceedings

12:15 p.m.

Conservative

Loyola Hearn St. John's South, NL

With regard to the study of the relationship between cod and seals being done by the Department of Fisheries and Oceans DFO: ( a ) when did this study begin; ( b ) how is this study being undertaken; ( c ) how many DFO personnel are involved in the study; ( d ) is any portion of the study been outsourced; ( e ) what is the cost of the study to the department broken down by fiscal year for the length of time the study has been underway and for the projected time it will take to complete; and ( f ) what DFO policies or recommendations have been cancelled, altered or implemented because of this research?

Question No. 105
Routine Proceedings

12:15 p.m.

Halifax West
Nova Scotia

Liberal

Geoff Regan Minister of Fisheries and Oceans

Mr. Speaker, in response to (a), the Atlantic seal research program was announced by the Minister of Fisheries and Oceans on April 24, 2003. The objective of this program was to expand current research activities to assess the impact of seals on fish stocks. A research program to address this objective was designed in the spring of 2003 and the research activities began in the summer of 2003.

In response to (b), scientists from the Quebec, Maritimes and Newfoundland and Labrador regions designed a research program containing three major components: (1) seal distribution and diet; (2) seal populations assessment; and (3) development of seal management tools. The field portion of the program is now nearly completed.

In response to (c), seven scientists, two biologists and five technicians from the Quebec, Maritimes and Newfoundland and Labrador regions have been involved in this project. In addition, about 30 invited scientists and students were involved in this study.

In response to (d), partnerships were developed to address various components of the study. The three large surveys, harp, hooded and grey seal populations, used logistical support from Canadian Coast Guard. Scientists from other research organizations in Norway, Denmark, and the United Kingdom cooperated in various components of the study. Some of the work was done in partnership with Memorial, Laval and Dalhousie universities. Some work was conducted by fishermen and sealers. A contract was also developed with ARGOS to obtain the information from the satellite transmitters that were used in the seal distribution study.

In response to (e), the Atlantic seal research program had a budget of $6 million. The project was initially planned for two years, fiscal years 2003-04 and 2004-05. However, it was extended for an additional year to allow the completion of the analyses of the data obtained and to produce a thorough report of the program's major findings. For fiscal year 2003-04, the budget was $3,125M, for fiscal year 2004-05, the budget was $2,548M , and for fiscal year 2005-06, the budget is $327.5K. The project will be completed at the end of fiscal year 2005-06.

In response to (f), the results of the Atlantic seal research program will be used to provide advice for seal management and for ecosystem based management, especially as it relates to the management of groundfish in the Atlantic. It is too early to evaluate which policies or practices have changed, but the programs are relevant to a number of DFO strategies or recommendations to come in the future, such as cod recovery, the seal hunt, et cetera

Question No. 106
Routine Proceedings

12:15 p.m.

Conservative

Loyola Hearn St. John's South, NL

With regard to the oil spill on November 21, 2004 off the Terra Nova platform and Canadian Coast Guard, CCG, involvement in any response: ( a ) how many CCG personnel were involved; ( b ) over what period of time were any CCG personnel involved; ( c ) how much CCG equipment, if any, was dedicated to the response and for what amount of time; ( d ) was there any reporting internal or external to the Department of Fisheries and Oceans that resulted from any CCG involvement in responding to this spill; ( e ) if CCG ships were part of the response, what responsibilities were forgone in order to respond to the spill?

Question No. 106
Routine Proceedings

12:15 p.m.

Halifax West
Nova Scotia

Liberal

Geoff Regan Minister of Fisheries and Oceans

Mr. Speaker, under the CCG environmental response, ER, response management system, RMS, there were three dedicated personnel involved in on-water containment and recovery operations, two dedicated shore based personnel in support of on-water operations and one individual to conduct fixed wing aerial surveillance patrols in an effort to estimate the volume of oil and its trajectory. In total, six CCG ER personnel were involved with the response to this incident. One additional person was tasked in an administrative capacity for two days, pursuant to cost recovery standard operating procedures.

CCG ER personnel were involved for a total of eight days. Pursuant to cost recovery standard operating procedures, one additional person was tasked in an administrative capacity for two days, post incident, to compile and submit the claim for ER's involvement in the operation.

One piece of dedicated pollution countermeasures equipment was deployed to the operating area for eight days.

As per standard operating procedures, incident, situation and status reports were generated and distributed internally as a result of CCG's involvement in this incident. Status reports were also distributed externally to Environment Canada, Transport Canada, the Department of National Defence and the Ship-Source Oil Pollution Fund.

While no CCG ships were involved in any capacity in the response to this incident, there were three dedicated on-water CCG personnel who provided assistance to the response operation from two different industry owned vessels.

Questions Passed as Orders for Returns
Routine Proceedings

April 15th, 2005 / 12:20 p.m.

Northumberland—Quinte West
Ontario

Liberal

Paul MacKlin Parliamentary Secretary to the Minister of Justice and Attorney General of Canada

Mr. Speaker, if Questions Nos. 97, 113 and 114 could be made orders for returns, the returns would be tabled immediately.

Questions Passed as Orders for Returns
Routine Proceedings

12:20 p.m.

The Deputy Speaker

Is that agreed?

Questions Passed as Orders for Returns
Routine Proceedings

12:20 p.m.

Some hon. members

Agreed.

Question No. 97
Routine Proceedings

12:20 p.m.

Conservative

John Williams Edmonton—St. Albert, AB

With regard to performance pay for public servants in the Executive (EX) category and the Deputy Minister (DM) category in fiscal year 2003-2004: ( a ) for each department, agency or Crown corporation, how many employees received performance pay, broken down by EX category (e.g. EX-1, EX-2, etc.); ( b ) for each department, agency or Crown corporation, how many employees are there in each EX category; ( c ) for each department, agency or Crown corporation, how many employees received performance pay, broken down by DM category (i.e. DM-1, DM-2, etc.); ( d ) for each department, agency or Crown corporation, how many employees are there in each DM category; and ( e ) for each department, agency or Crown corporation, what was the total amount paid out in performance pay?

(Return tabled)