House of Commons Hansard #122 of the 38th Parliament, 1st Session. (The original version is on Parliament's site.) The word of the day was c-48.

Topics

Air-India
Statements by Members

2:05 p.m.

Liberal

Navdeep Bains Mississauga—Brampton South, ON

Mr. Speaker, it is appropriate that we take this time to commemorate the lives lost 20 years ago today and remember the victims of flight 182.

As indicated by the Deputy Prime Minister, flags at all federal government sites are flying at half-mast today. The Prime Minister has named June 23 as a national day to remember victims of terrorism. The government is also committed to establishing a permanent commemorative site in Canada.

Each of these steps is an important recognition of a significant tragedy that took place in Canadian history. We must learn from this terrorist event to ensure it never happens again, but on a personal note as well, we must remember the victims.

Ontario Pork Congress
Statements by Members

2:05 p.m.

Conservative

Gary Schellenberger Perth—Wellington, ON

Mr. Speaker, I am pleased to rise today to recognize a very important event taking place this week in my riding of Perth--Wellington.

The 32nd Annual Ontario Pork Congress is under way and the always popular event is showcasing the pork industry with the theme “Strive to Thrive in 2005”.

The pork congress is a festive event which profiles the future of the industry while celebrating the past. It is a great mix of tradition and innovation.

This past Saturday, I joined Ontario pork producers at their gala dinner in Stratford. I want to extend my best wishes to President John Crowley and all of the pork producers and suppliers attending this week's pork congress.

I ask members to please join me in recognizing Ontario's pork industry and the safe and delicious food it produces.

Air-India
Statements by Members

2:05 p.m.

Liberal

Roy Cullen Etobicoke North, ON

Mr. Speaker, today we reflect on the tragedy of the 329 lives lost on Air-India flight 182.

In the 20 years since the bombing, numerous inquiries, investigations and trials have led to many improvements in the safety and security of Canada's air transportation system.

We have completely modified our national security structure to focus on terrorism, as well as improving the collaboration between security and intelligence services such as the RCMP and CSIS.

To prevent terrorist attacks, the government has passed the Anti-terrorism Act and the Public Safety Act and has integrated numerous public safety strategies through the national security policy.

These initiatives show the government's commitment to vigilance in its efforts to protect Canadians. We have learned from the tragedy that occurred 20 years ago, and must continue to put into practice the knowledge we have acquired.

Zonolite Insulation
Statements by Members

2:10 p.m.

NDP

Pat Martin Winnipeg Centre, MB

Mr. Speaker, it is with great sadness that I inform the House that Zonolite insulation has claimed another life. Yesterday morning, my constituent Rebecca Bruce died of mesothelioma, a cancer caused by exposure to asbestos. She was only 47 and will be sadly missed by her husband Dennis and her two sons, Sidney and Shawn.

Rebecca's sister, Raven Thundersky, has struggled for years to have the health risks of asbestos-laden Zonolite addressed. They grew up on the Poplar River Indian Reserve in a house insulated with Zonolite, and now this Zonolite is killing them at an alarming rate. Rebecca is the fourth to die in a family of eight.

Today we honour the spirit of Rebecca Bruce, another aboriginal woman forced to live in substandard housing, another aboriginal woman murdered by the W.R. Grace Company, which sold Zonolite long after it knew it was contaminated with deadly tremolite asbestos.

Tomorrow, in her memory, we pledge to fight for all asbestos victims and to continue the fight to protect Canadians from deadly Zonolite insulation.

St. Jean Baptiste Day
Statements by Members

June 23rd, 2005 / 2:10 p.m.

Conservative

Guy Lauzon Stormont—Dundas—South Glengarry, ON

Mr. Speaker, tomorrow, in accordance with tradition, Quebec will be celebrating St. Jean Baptiste Day.

The history of this celebration goes back to Gaul, where there was a tradition of lighting fires throughout the night of the summer solstice, that is, the longest night of the year. The tradition was carried on in France until the Revolution, and crossed the Atlantic to take root along the shores of the St. Lawrence.

Proclaimed the official holiday of Quebeckers in 1834 by the St. Jean Baptiste Society, the day has held special meaning for all Quebeckers ever since.

The Conservative Party caucus joins with me in wishing a happy St. Jean Baptiste Day to all Quebeckers everywhere.

Quebeckers' National Day
Statements by Members

2:10 p.m.

Bloc

Monique Guay Rivière-du-Nord, QC

Mr. Speaker, this evening and all day tomorrow, Quebec will be swept by a tide of happiness, laughter and joy as people celebrate being Quebeckers of all origins.

In the Magdalen Islands, Blanc-Sablon, Abitibi, Pointe-à-la Croix, Quebec City, Montreal, Verchères, Sherbrooke, Trois-Rivières and Rivière-du-Nord, Quebeckers throughout Quebec will celebrate their national day with pride.

This year, we are honouring the songs of Quebec and those who create and perform them. As we know, Quebec's history, culture and language are intimately connected.

For over 400 years, as we have moved toward affirming our national identity, our artists have lent their words, rhythm and voices in order to express who we are and reflect our emotions, both the highs and the lows, and our hopes as well.

Quebec is music to our eyes and ears. We will say it and we will sing it. Happy national day, Quebec.

Multiculturalism
Statements by Members

2:10 p.m.

Liberal

Ruby Dhalla Brampton—Springdale, ON

Mr. Speaker, Canadians are an increasingly diverse population. We can be and should be proud of our multicultural heritage. We have a tremendous amount to learn from each other and from how the diverse communities of our nation contribute to the building and strengthening of our nation.

Diversity is one of our nation's greatest strengths. The powerful and peaceful combination of so many people with so many different traditions, languages and beliefs is truly an inspiration to the world. All Canadians have an integral role to play in this source of pride and a commitment to further strengthening it.

June 27 is Canada's Multiculturalism Day. Canada is the world's first official multicultural country. This important day is going to bring together Canadians to celebrate our shared values and to strengthen our atmosphere of tolerance, understanding and respect. I invite all Canadians to participate in this celebration on June 27.

Air-India
Statements by Members

2:15 p.m.

Conservative

Deepak Obhrai Calgary East, AB

Mr. Speaker, today, June 23, marks the 20th anniversary of the Air-India bombing. To date it remains Canada's worst terrorist attack and to date we still have no answers. Over 320 people are dead and no one has been brought to justice.

I rise not only for those who were killed, but for the families and loved ones who remain and whose lives were changed forever. In an instant children lost their parents. Husbands and wives were split. The magnitude of this tragedy is immeasurable and without words.

In 1999 I attended the memorial service in Ireland. This year the leader of the official opposition is attending the memorial in Ireland on behalf of the Conservative Party.

On behalf of my colleagues in the House, I extend our deeply felt sympathy to the families of the victims. The Conservative Party supports recognizing June 23 as a national day of mourning for victims of terrorism.

Air-India
Statements by Members

2:15 p.m.

Liberal

Hedy Fry Vancouver Centre, BC

Mr. Speaker, the Deputy Prime Minister said that the Government of Canada is committed to doing all it can to ensure that tragedies such as Air-India 182 never happen again and this is good. Bob Rae noted that the crime was planned and executed in Canada, something that our society cannot ignore.

Canadians are a diverse people coming from nearly every corner of the globe. In many parts of the world religious, ethnic and racial hatred and xenophobia date back centuries, even millennia.

If we are to build a safe, peaceful and respectful society, those old hatreds must be left behind. There must be zero tolerance for acts of violence and hatred. Governments at all levels, in partnership with civil society, must play a stronger role in promoting a tolerant multicultural society and ensuring social cohesion

This is the best way to honour the lives of the 329 people who were murdered 20 years ago today.

The Budget
Oral Question Period

2:15 p.m.

Conservative

Peter MacKay Central Nova, NS

Mr. Speaker, clearly the Prime Minister was not serious when he said that it is time to put politics aside and pass the budget. The Liberal leader in the Senate is cynically playing politics with the government's own budget bill by holding up its passage. It proves again that the say anything, do anything, deceitful Prime Minister will do anything to cling to power.

The Prime Minister has his leader in the Senate deliberately slowing down the passage of the budget bill until the NDP add-on Bill C-48 passes. His mismanagement of the House has led to the impasse.

Why is he now punishing Atlantic Canadians to achieve his own partisan political gain?

The Budget
Oral Question Period

2:15 p.m.

Hamilton East—Stoney Creek
Ontario

Liberal

Tony Valeri Leader of the Government in the House of Commons

Mr. Speaker, as members know, we do not speak for the other place. I would suggest to the hon. member that he call his hon. colleagues in the other place and perhaps get the same cooperation that he seems to be suggesting we are getting on Bill C-43. Perhaps he could ask for that same cooperation so that the Senate can deal expeditiously with Bills C-48 and C-38 when they both get to the Senate.

The Budget
Oral Question Period

2:15 p.m.

Conservative

Peter MacKay Central Nova, NS

Mr. Speaker, I am surprised that a House leader would suggest that the Senate could deal with a bill that it does not have.

Conservative Senators proposed fast tracking Bill C-43, the original budget, so that it could be passed in one day. In fact, that would have meant that the offshore royalties to Atlantic Canada could begin flowing today. It is costing Newfoundland and Labrador $132,000 a day and Nova Scotia $55,000 a day in lost interest.

Why is the Prime Minister allowing his Liberal dominated Senate to punish Atlantic Canada by delaying the benefits of the Atlantic accord? Will the government pay the lost interest to those provinces due to his deliberate disingenuous dithering?

The Budget
Oral Question Period

2:15 p.m.

Wascana
Saskatchewan

Liberal

Ralph Goodale Minister of Finance

Mr. Speaker, last year the budget was presented in the latter part of March and the major budget legislation was indeed passed through all stages into law by about the middle of May.

Opposition members have had eight weeks to deal expeditiously with this legislation. They have stalled, filibustered and obfuscated at every point. It hardly lies in their mouths to accuse the government of any delay.

The Budget
Oral Question Period

2:15 p.m.

Conservative

Peter MacKay Central Nova, NS

Mr. Speaker, what unadulterated nonsense from the Minister of Finance, knowing his own party dithered on these bills.

In the other place Liberals are deliberately delaying the passage of their own bill and the Atlantic accord to step up pressure to pass the NDP add-on, prop-up bill.

Let us be clear. The Liberal Party is now cutting deals with the separatists to appease the socialists to support its corrupt government. Again, the government is in bed with the Bloc and nuzzling the NDP.

Why is the government playing political footsies with its new friends, and partisan games with Atlantic Canada and the lives of Atlantic Canadians?

The Budget
Oral Question Period

2:20 p.m.

Wascana
Saskatchewan

Liberal

Ralph Goodale Minister of Finance

Mr. Speaker, let us follow the opposition party's course on the budget legislation in the House.

First of all, the opposition members said that this was a budget that they could support. Then on the first vote they abstained from voting. Then when it came to that package on the crucial first confidence vote, they voted against the budget package. They voted to defeat the government, which would have effectively defeated the Atlantic accord. Then finally they came around to supporting Bill C-43 after months and months of delay. They could have had it passed in March.