House of Commons Hansard #32 of the 39th Parliament, 1st Session. (The original version is on Parliament's site.) The word of the day was sentence.

Topics

Housing
Oral Questions

11:40 a.m.

NDP

Irene Mathyssen London—Fanshawe, ON

Mr. Speaker, the recently issued UN report is a stinging indictment of the way past Conservative and Liberal governments have created huge holes in Canada's social safety net. The report is especially critical of Canada's treatment of single mothers. It states that women without housing are forced to give up their kids and that women cannot leave relationships due to inadequate assistance.

When will the government stand up for Canadian women and take action to end poverty and when will it increase access to safe, affordable housing?

Housing
Oral Questions

11:45 a.m.

Blackstrap
Saskatchewan

Conservative

Lynne Yelich Parliamentary Secretary to the Minister of Human Resources and Social Development

Mr. Speaker, our country is proud of its standard of living. We think the Government of Canada does have in place a range of measures to improve the social and economic well-being of Canadians, and women in particular.

I am pleased that our recent budget included a range of measures to support families with children as well as initiatives that address housing and homelessness, skills development, employment and education.

Housing
Oral Questions

11:45 a.m.

NDP

Irene Mathyssen London—Fanshawe, ON

Mr. Speaker, every penny in the Conservative budget for housing was a re-announcement of money that we secured in the NDP budget. Just like under the Liberals, there is a lot of talk on housing but no action. The housing crisis in our country is an internationally recognized shame and the government is doing nothing about it.

Could the government tell us why, at a time when it has record surpluses, it can find billions to subsidize profitable oil companies, but not one new penny for affordable housing?

Housing
Oral Questions

11:45 a.m.

Blackstrap
Saskatchewan

Conservative

Lynne Yelich Parliamentary Secretary to the Minister of Human Resources and Social Development

Mr. Speaker, then I am sure the member will vote with us for budget 2006. We announced $1.4 billion for affordable housing, including $800 million to increase the supply of safe and affordable housing and up to $300 million to address the acute housing situation of the north.

I encourage the member to help us get the budget through so we can address her issues with housing.

Justice
Oral Questions

11:45 a.m.

Liberal

Sue Barnes London West, ON

Mr. Speaker, the constitutionality of any piece of legislation before the House is an important issue for all Canadians. Is it the practice of the Minister of Justice and Attorney General of Canada and the Conservative government to certify the constitutionality of each piece of legislation when it is introduced?

Has the minister certified the constitutionality of Bill C-2, the accountability legislation?

Justice
Oral Questions

11:45 a.m.

Fundy Royal
New Brunswick

Conservative

Rob Moore Parliamentary Secretary to the Minister of Justice and Attorney General of Canada

Mr. Speaker, the Department of Justice Act requires that the Attorney General satisfy himself as to the constitutionality of legislation, and he has done so in this case.

Justice
Oral Questions

11:45 a.m.

Liberal

Sue Barnes London West, ON

Mr. Speaker, the government does not take accountability as seriously as its press releases indicate. It is the responsibility of the Attorney General to assure the House that all government legislation passes a constitutionality test. Everyone knows this except, apparently, the Minister of Justice.

The Law Clerk of the House of Commons says that certain sections of Bill C-2 are unconstitutional. Has the minister certified the constitutionality of each piece of legislation that he has put before the House?

Justice
Oral Questions

11:45 a.m.

Calgary Southeast
Alberta

Conservative

Jason Kenney Parliamentary Secretary to the Prime Minister

Mr. Speaker, the answer is yes.

However, speaking of Bill C-2, it deals with the reform of party financing legislation. Therefore, will the member propose an amendment to ban contributions to parties from children? Her party found an innovation in party financing, raising $11,000 from twin 11-year-olds. That is the new Liberal Party financing strategy.

Public Works and Government Services
Oral Questions

June 2nd, 2006 / 11:45 a.m.

Liberal

Marcel Proulx Hull—Aylmer, QC

Mr. Speaker, a few weeks ago, the Minister of Public Works and Government Services contradicted his parliamentary secretary, who stated in this House that no agreement had been reached with respect to the former JDS Uniphase campus, which is owned by Minto Developments. The deputy minister, David Marshall, and his assistant deputy minister, Tim McGrath, appeared before the Standing Committee on Government Operations and Estimates yesterday and admitted that the unsolicited offer, which was not publicly tendered, had been accepted at a cost of $600 million, and that the Treasury Board would approve the deal by June 15.

Who is telling the truth?

Public Works and Government Services
Oral Questions

11:45 a.m.

Port Moody—Westwood—Port Coquitlam
B.C.

Conservative

James Moore Parliamentary Secretary to the Minister of Public Works and Government Services and Minister for the Pacific Gateway and the Vancouver-Whistler Olympics

Mr. Speaker, first, I know the hon. member is the new public works critic for the opposition. I wish him well in his new post. I know he will do a good job on this file.

The reality is that this is not in fact complete. The Department of Public Works has signed, with Minto Developments, an agreement in principle, but the deal has not yet been finalized.

Public Works and Government Services
Oral Questions

11:50 a.m.

Liberal

Marcel Proulx Hull—Aylmer, QC

Mr. Speaker, transparency is essential to good public administration. The government must go through an open tendering process every time it wishes to buy, rent or build government buildings. The people of Canada and the House of Commons have the right to be informed of all of these expenses, and only a public competitive process will ensure that this principle is respected.

How did the Conservative government manage to skip over the competitive process inherent in a public tender? Why did it forget about transparency?

Public Works and Government Services
Oral Questions

11:50 a.m.

Port Moody—Westwood—Port Coquitlam
B.C.

Conservative

James Moore Parliamentary Secretary to the Minister of Public Works and Government Services and Minister for the Pacific Gateway and the Vancouver-Whistler Olympics

Mr. Speaker, we followed the regular procedures and the standards applied by the Liberal government when it was in power. All of the standards were applied. I must inform the member and the House that the process is not yet completed. Until it is, we cannot discuss it because the process must be respected.

National Revenue
Oral Questions

11:50 a.m.

Bloc

Robert Bouchard Chicoutimi—Le Fjord, QC

Mr. Speaker, yesterday, we asked the Minister of National Revenue whether the federal government would follow the example of Quebec, which just relinquished $24 million in taxes owed by Vincent Lacroix of Norbourg. Judging by her answer, the minister clearly did not understand the question.

I ask her again: will the government follow Quebec's lead and redistribute the $12 million Vincent Lacroix owes the government to the people he defrauded?

National Revenue
Oral Questions

11:50 a.m.

Saskatoon—Rosetown—Biggar
Saskatchewan

Conservative

Carol Skelton Minister of National Revenue and Minister of Western Economic Diversification

Mr. Speaker, as the hon. member knows, confidentiality provisions in the Income Tax Act prevent me from discussing specific cases or any action that may be taken by our government.

Marine Industry
Oral Questions

11:50 a.m.

Bloc

Paul Crête Montmagny—L'Islet—Kamouraska—Rivière-du-Loup, QC

Mr. Speaker, after suffering the indifference of the federal government, the Lévis shipyard should be able to survive thanks to Teco Management, a Norwegian group that is purchasing the shipyard.

However, to avoid having this turn into only a short-term recovery, can the Minister of Industry assure us that he will reactivate the structured funding mechanism that was put in place in response to the Bloc Québécois initiative, in order to stimulate shipbuilding?