House of Commons Hansard #8 of the 39th Parliament, 2nd Session. (The original version is on Parliament's site.) The word of the day was taxes.

Topics

Public Safety
Oral Questions

2:45 p.m.

Liberal

Yasmin Ratansi Don Valley East, ON

Mr. Speaker, that is not good enough. U.S. senators and even the Minister of Public Safety have claimed that they have seen the documents used to deport Mr. Arar and can find no information that points to Mr. Arar being involved in terrorist activity.

Justice O'Connor did a thorough investigation and cleared Mr. Arar, yet he remains on the U.S. no-fly list and the government is doing nothing.

With Mr. Arar still on the no-fly list and thousands more passenger lists being passed into American hands, when will the government stop bowing to the White House?

Public Safety
Oral Questions

2:45 p.m.

Okanagan—Coquihalla
B.C.

Conservative

Stockwell Day Minister of Public Safety

Mr. Speaker, the situation with Mr. Arar, which took place entirely under the Liberal regime, is something that we took very seriously. We have followed every one of the recommendations from Justice O'Connor, including compensation for Mr. Arar, including an apology from this government for what happened under the Liberal regime.

At every diplomatic level, from the Prime Minister to the President, from our foreign affairs minister to the secretary of state, from me to the head of homeland security, we have asked that Mr. Arar's name be removed from those lists.

Air Transportation
Oral Questions

2:45 p.m.

Liberal

Sue Barnes London West, ON

Mr. Speaker, the Minister of Transport denies saying what he said in the House two days ago. Let me quote the minister's words from Hansard:

So far, we have been able to ensure that almost 80% of flights will not be captured by the new U.S. law.

What happens to the rest of those flights? Will the passenger information be disclosed for these flights? Can the minister now be very clear to Canadians just exactly what he means?

Air Transportation
Oral Questions

2:50 p.m.

Pontiac
Québec

Conservative

Lawrence Cannon Minister of Transport

Mr. Speaker, once again, I want to indicate to the members of this House that this is a U.S. regulation. These regulations were introduced by the U.S. government in the month of August.

We have been consulted. We continue to work in order to exonerate Canadians from being put on this list. We do it while respecting Canadians' rights, but I do want to indicate to the members of this House, what is important is the safety and the security of Canadians as they take flights.

Air Transportation
Oral Questions

2:50 p.m.

Liberal

Sue Barnes London West, ON

Mr. Speaker, it makes front page news again this morning. The U.S. is very hostile toward Cuba, where tens of thousands of Canadians vacation every winter.

The Bush administration's new requirement that airlines disclose the private information of all passengers who enter American airspace on the way to Cuba raises a question. How will the Americans use this data?

Will Canadians who visit Cuba encounter difficulties at the U.S. border the next time they try to enter that country? What guarantees does the minister have to offer this? This is a serious question. I hope that he has a serious answer.

Air Transportation
Oral Questions

2:50 p.m.

Pontiac
Québec

Conservative

Lawrence Cannon Minister of Transport

Mr. Speaker, the guarantee that I can offer to the members of this House is that this government takes this issue seriously. We are working to ensure that our Canadian rights are well understood and respected. Furthermore, we are confident that Canada and the U.S. will be able to work out a solution, so that it will enable Canadians to fly safely and securely across the continent.

Securities
Oral Questions

2:50 p.m.

Bloc

Paul Crête Montmagny—L'Islet—Kamouraska—Rivière-du-Loup, QC

Mr. Speaker, the Speech from the Throne provides for the creation of a single body to regulate securities. The Minister of Finance may say the current system does not work, but he is wrong. The truth is that he wants to give something back to his friends on Bay Street. Everyone in Quebec is against his proposed centralized regulatory body.

Will the political lieutenant for Quebec, the Minister of Transport, Infrastructure and Communities, promise to protect the interests of Quebec in cabinet and convince his colleague, the Minister of Finance, to give up on his plan?

Securities
Oral Questions

2:50 p.m.

Whitby—Oshawa
Ontario

Conservative

Jim Flaherty Minister of Finance

Mr. Speaker, the Speech from the Throne said that our government believes that the constitutional jurisdiction of every level of government must be respected. As such, a committee will be struck to draft a model bill that we will discuss with our provincial colleagues.

Securities
Oral Questions

2:50 p.m.

Bloc

Paul Crête Montmagny—L'Islet—Kamouraska—Rivière-du-Loup, QC

Mr. Speaker, the government can pat itself on the back about its open federalism and say that every level of government must be respected, but it is doing just the opposite. The World Bank and the OECD say that the current system works well.

Will the political lieutenant for Quebec, the Minister of Transport, Infrastructure and Communities, defend Quebec instead of Ontario and demand that the Minister of Finance drop this idea? Will he accept his responsibilities as the minister responsible for Quebec?

Securities
Oral Questions

2:50 p.m.

Whitby—Oshawa
Ontario

Conservative

Jim Flaherty Minister of Finance

Mr. Speaker, as was said in the Speech from the Throne, our government believes that the constitutional jurisdiction of each order of government should be respected.

There will be a panel reporting to the ministers of finance with respect to a draft, a model bill, that we could use as a basis for discussion, not for a federal regulator but for a common regulator shared among the jurisdictions in Canada.

Air Transportation
Oral Questions

2:50 p.m.

Liberal

Mario Silva Davenport, ON

Mr. Speaker, the government claims to have established a so-called good relationship with the Bush White House.

Yet, we can only wonder what a good relationship really means when the Bush administration is forcing Canadian air carriers to hand over personal information about passengers and the government is afraid to stand up for Canadians and say no.

Why will the government not stand up for Canada and say it is unwilling to allow this unreasonable intrusion from the Bush administration?

Air Transportation
Oral Questions

2:50 p.m.

Pontiac
Québec

Conservative

Lawrence Cannon Minister of Transport

Mr. Speaker, again, it is a U.S. regulation. The U.S. put the regulation forward in the month of August.

As a government, we were consulted. As hon. members know, we have come forward with our passenger protect program. It was an initiative that the former government had also put forward and was not able to complete.

We are working with a set of circumstances where, of course, we want to ensure that these regulations have a minimum effect on Canadians. We are continuing to do our work in that regard and we will ensure that our voice and our concerns are well considered and well taken care of.

Canada Post Corporation
Oral Questions

October 25th, 2007 / 2:55 p.m.

Conservative

Cheryl Gallant Renfrew—Nipissing—Pembroke, ON

Mr. Speaker, many Canadians show their support for our brave women and men in uniform by writing letters of encouragement to them.

I understand that Canada Post will start to provide free delivery of letters from families and friends to Canadian troops deployed in Afghanistan and elsewhere overseas.

Can the Minister responsible for Canada Post--

Canada Post Corporation
Oral Questions

2:55 p.m.

Some hon. members

Hear, hear!

Oh, oh!

Canada Post Corporation
Oral Questions

2:55 p.m.

Liberal

The Speaker Peter Milliken

Order, please. The hon. member for Renfrew—Nipissing—Pembroke has the floor to put her question. She is not finished putting her question.