House of Commons Hansard #21 of the 39th Parliament, 2nd Session. (The original version is on Parliament's site.) The word of the day was youth.

Topics

Criminal Code
Routine Proceedings

3:20 p.m.

Some hon. members

Agreed.

No.

Oral Questions
Points of Order
Routine Proceedings

3:20 p.m.

Liberal

Ralph Goodale Wascana, SK

Mr. Speaker, I have a point of order arising out of question period. I have just obtained the preliminary Hansard from question period to verify the point that I have in mind, which I would like to raise at this time.

In question period, a number of questions were addressed to the government House leader with respect to the issue of redistribution of seats in the House of Commons and, particularly, the impact upon Ontario.

In response to the Leader of the Opposition, the government House leader at one point said, “When he”, that is the Leader of the Opposition, “was in cabinet they introduced bills twice to deal with redistribution and never once proposed increasing a single seat” with respect to Ontario.

That is factually incorrect. In 1996-97, four more seats were added for Ontario and two for British Columbia. In 2003-04, three more seats were added for Ontario, two for Alberta and two more for British Columbia.

Now that the government House leader knows that seats were indeed added for Ontario, I think he will want to correct the record now that he knows he misspoke.

Oral Questions
Points of Order
Routine Proceedings

3:20 p.m.

Liberal

The Speaker Peter Milliken

The hon. government House leader is rising to respond to this. I am not sure it is a point of order at all. It sounds like a matter of debate, but the government House leader wishes to say something in the circumstances.

Oral Questions
Points of Order
Routine Proceedings

3:20 p.m.

York—Simcoe
Ontario

Conservative

Peter Van Loan Leader of the Government in the House of Commons and Minister for Democratic Reform

Mr. Speaker, I quite agree with the House leader for the Liberal Party. That bill did in fact, under the old formula, which significantly underrepresented Ontario, Alberta and B.C., add additional seats. It was a small number as he indicated, four, in contrast with our bill which is ten.

The real point that I was attempting to make was that it did not add a fair representation level for Ontario nor for Alberta and B.C. The Liberals took action then that did not have a fair representation level.

However, in terms of additional seats, the member is correct.

Mr. Speaker, while I have the floor, I have a point of order on a different point. It addresses the question of the issue of the environment minister identifying people in the gallery.

In your consideration, Mr. Speaker, I would encourage you to look at an incident that occurred on February 3, 2004 when you were Speaker when the member for LaSalle—Émard, who was prime minister at the time, said in Hansard:

In the new economy education comes in many forms. Over the last several years I have visited many union training centres. They are an essential part of our education system and they should have a much stronger relationship with government.

There are many union leaders, some are in the gallery, with whom I have had--

At that point there was a bit of tumult in the House. Then the Speaker, quite rightly, intervened and said:

The right hon. Prime Minister knows that referring to the presence of persons in the gallery is against the rules. He would not want to set a bad example for other members, however interested, and I would urge him to refrain from this.

That appears to have been the only admonition or punishment meted out on the occasion. I suggest that is consistent with the Speaker's conduct today.

Oral Questions
Points of Order
Routine Proceedings

3:20 p.m.

Liberal

The Speaker Peter Milliken

To deal with the point of order raised by the House leader for the official opposition, I think that is a matter for debate and we have had the debate so that is finished.

However, with respect to the second point of order, I appreciate the comments from the government House leader. I am sure that in considering any additional punishment that might be meted out to any hon. member, I will bear in mind his very succinct remarks and references to other precedents. I know there are many. This is a lapse that occasionally occurs in the House, sometimes directly and sometimes less directly. The Chair has to try to weigh what is appropriate in the circumstances in each case. I know that the Minister of the Environment was quite repentant.

Scrutiny of Regulations
Committees of the House
Routine Proceedings

November 21st, 2007 / 3:20 p.m.

Liberal

Derek Lee Scarborough—Rouge River, ON

Mr. Speaker, I would seek the unanimous consent of the House to revert to motions and, if there is unanimous consent, I would move that the first report of the Standing Joint Committee on Scrutiny of Regulations, presented to the House earlier today, be concurred in.

Scrutiny of Regulations
Committees of the House
Routine Proceedings

3:25 p.m.

Liberal

The Speaker Peter Milliken

Does the hon. member for Scarborough—Rouge River have the unanimous consent of the House to propose the motion?

Scrutiny of Regulations
Committees of the House
Routine Proceedings

3:25 p.m.

Some hon. members

Agreed.

Scrutiny of Regulations
Committees of the House
Routine Proceedings

3:25 p.m.

Liberal

The Speaker Peter Milliken

Is it the pleasure of the House to adopt the motion?

Scrutiny of Regulations
Committees of the House
Routine Proceedings

3:25 p.m.

Some hon. members

Agreed.

Scrutiny of Regulations
Committees of the House
Routine Proceedings

3:25 p.m.

Liberal

The Speaker Peter Milliken

(Motion agreed to)

Visitor Visas
Petitions
Routine Proceedings

3:25 p.m.

Conservative

Pierre Poilievre Nepean—Carleton, ON

Mr. Speaker, I rise today to present a petition on behalf of constituents of Polish heritage. The petitioners note that Canadian citizens no longer require visitor visas to visit Poland.

Therefore, the petitioners call upon Parliament to lift the visa requirement for the Republic of Poland.

CP Rail
Petitions
Routine Proceedings

3:25 p.m.

Conservative

Gary Goodyear Cambridge, ON

Mr. Speaker, today I wish to table a petition of well over 1,000 signatures. These petitioners from across Canada, specifically in my riding of Cambridge, in North Dumfries township and in Oxford county, have raised serious concerns about the Canadian Pacific Railway and its lack of civic, social, corporate responsibilities, as well as its refusal to cooperate and respect the communities it steamrolls through.

CP is flaunting the fact that federal laws have little jurisdiction over it and the petitioners say that they will not be railroaded by the railroad.

The petitioners ask that the Department of Transport, the Department of the Environment, the Department of Fisheries and Oceans, the Minister of Public Safety, as well as the Minister of Health use their collective influence to immediately require the Canadian Pacific Railway to appropriately protect the environment, show some respect for Canadians and start acting like good neighbours should.

Afghanistan
Petitions
Routine Proceedings

3:25 p.m.

Bloc

Pauline Picard Drummond, QC

Mr. Speaker, I am pleased to present to the House a petition from citizens of the riding of Drummond, who are asking the House of Commons and the government to make a clear commitment to the withdrawal of troops from combat zones in Afghanistan in February 2009.

Furthermore, the current mission must be rebalanced by lessening the military aspect and increasing humanitarian support.

Asbestos
Petitions
Routine Proceedings

3:25 p.m.

NDP

Pat Martin Winnipeg Centre, MB

Mr. Speaker, I have a petition signed by thousands of Canadians who call upon Parliament to note that asbestos is the greatest industrial killer the world has ever known and yet Canada continues to be one of the largest producers and exporters of asbestos in the world. Canada allows asbestos to be used in construction materials, textile products and even children's toys.

The petitioners ask Parliament to note that the United States Senate unanimously passed, on October 4, bill 742, the bill to ban asbestos from that country.

Therefore, the petitioners call upon Parliament to ban asbestos in all its forms, end all government subsidies for asbestos, both in Canada and abroad, and stop blocking international health and safety conventions designed to protect workers from asbestos, such as the Rotterdam Convention.