House of Commons Hansard #113 of the 39th Parliament, 2nd Session. (The original version is on Parliament's site.) The word of the day was quebec.

Topics

Ethics
Oral Questions

2:35 p.m.

Liberal

Dominic LeBlanc Beauséjour, NB

Mr. Speaker, it is strange that the Conservatives have offered up their “expert audio analysis” months after the allegations were made.

One of Canada’s top audio experts, Stevan Pausak, says someone hired him a long time ago to analyze the recording where the Prime Minister talks about “financial considerations”.

How many experts did the Conservatives shop the recording around to until they got the answer they wanted?

Ethics
Oral Questions

2:40 p.m.

Port Moody—Westwood—Port Coquitlam
B.C.

Conservative

James Moore Parliamentary Secretary to the Minister of Public Works and Government Services and for the Pacific Gateway and the Vancouver-Whistler Olympics

Mr. Speaker, the question is exactly the same in French and English. My colleague can look at the answer I have just given in English.

I would invite my colleague from Beauséjour to check his mail. He asked the RCMP to look into this. The Liberals gave the RCMP everything that they had on this. Here is what the RCMP said: There is “no evidence to support a charge under the Criminal Code or under the Parliament of Canada Act”. There is no evidence.

Do you know why there is no evidence, Mr. Speaker? This is as clear an example of Occam's razor as anybody has ever seen. There was no wrongdoing. The simplest explanation stands. There was no wrongdoing. The Liberals should listen to the RCMP, drop their false charge and apologize to the Prime Minister.

Election Financing
Oral Questions

2:40 p.m.

Liberal

Bonnie Brown Oakville, ON

Mr. Speaker, at the heart of the in and out scandal is Elections Canada's finding that Conservative candidates filed expense claims that they ought to have known were false and misleading. Not a single contract exists between any candidate and the company that handled the ad buys. Worse, it appears that invoices were forged after the fact to try to cover up the original crime.

When will the Conservatives simply come clean, admit they broke the law, and drop the frivolous court case against Elections Canada?

Election Financing
Oral Questions

2:40 p.m.

Nepean—Carleton
Ontario

Conservative

Pierre Poilievre Parliamentary Secretary to the President of the Treasury Board

Mr. Speaker, as I have mentioned before, Conservative candidates spent Conservative funds on Conservative ads. They got financial assistance from the national party to do so. Elections Canada found out about this because we told it. Why would we not? After all, it is legal and all parties do it.

Elections Canada singled us out so we took it to court. One day before Elections Canada officials were to be questioned, they interrupted proceedings by barging into our office with Liberal cameras following soon behind. We find this very unusual and we will continue to press our case.

Election Financing
Oral Questions

June 16th, 2008 / 2:40 p.m.

Liberal

Bonnie Brown Oakville, ON

Mr. Speaker, that member should follow the Ottawa Citizen's advice and step aside.

The Conservatives even tried to gouge their own candidates by telling them to bill for amounts above and beyond the actual costs. In a December 14, 2005 email, Michael Donison of the Conservative Party staff suggests billing candidates set amounts even though “the actual media buy for that region will be less”. That is fraud.

Why does the government insist on defending what is so clearly indefensible?

Election Financing
Oral Questions

2:40 p.m.

Nepean—Carleton
Ontario

Conservative

Pierre Poilievre Parliamentary Secretary to the President of the Treasury Board

Mr. Speaker, Conservative candidates spent Conservative funds on Conservative advertising. They got financial assistance to do so from the national party. Elections Canada found out about this because we told it. Why would we not? After all, it is legal and all parties do it.

Elections Canada singled us out, so we took it to took to court. Elections Canada interrupted those proceedings one day before being questioned, by barging into our office, followed quickly behind by Liberal cameras. We find this very unusual, so we will continue to press our case.

Not for Profit Industry
Oral Questions

2:40 p.m.

Conservative

Dave Van Kesteren Chatham-Kent—Essex, ON

Mr. Speaker, not for profit organizations play an important role in building a stronger Canada. They are significant contributors to our economy.

On Friday, the government tabled a bill, the Canada not-for-profit corporations act.

Could the Secretary of State (Small Business and Tourism) explain why the legislation is important and how it will contribute to reduce paper burden on business?

Not for Profit Industry
Oral Questions

2:40 p.m.

Calgary—Nose Hill
Alberta

Conservative

Diane Ablonczy Secretary of State (Small Business and Tourism)

Mr. Speaker, the new act would modernize the not for profit sector. The old act is from 1917. New measures would promote accountability, better protect the rights of members and clarify responsibilities of directors. This would enhance public trust in a sector, which includes national business associations and charities, like the United Way and the Canadian Federation of Independent Business. The new act would help reduce the regulatory and paper burden.

The new act would mean that not for profits would spend less time and money on red tape and more time on what they do best, which is help deliver important services to Canadians.

Health
Oral Questions

2:45 p.m.

NDP

Judy Wasylycia-Leis Winnipeg North, MB

Mr. Speaker, lead and lead compounds are prohibited ingredients in cosmetics in Canada for good reason. Lead is a neurotoxin that can cause cancer or reproductive toxicity. Yet the government will not disclose which brands of lipstick actually contain lead.

Why is the government hiding the truth from Canadians?

Health
Oral Questions

2:45 p.m.

Charleswood—St. James—Assiniboia
Manitoba

Conservative

Steven Fletcher Parliamentary Secretary for Health

Mr. Speaker, Health Canada monitors the levels of lead or any other toxins in any material. I can tell the member that the levels are within safe criteria.

My question, though, is this. Why does the Liberal leader want to increase the cost of cosmetics due to his carbon tax?

Health
Oral Questions

2:45 p.m.

NDP

Judy Wasylycia-Leis Winnipeg North, MB

Mr. Speaker, this is a serious health issue. Evidence shows that there are brands of lipstick that contain beyond any acceptable level of lead or a lead compound. Therefore, we are simply asking the government this. Why will it not even reveal the names of the lipstick brands that have levels of lead that are toxic. Why does it not give Canadians the information they need so at least they can protect their own health?

Health
Oral Questions

2:45 p.m.

Charleswood—St. James—Assiniboia
Manitoba

Conservative

Steven Fletcher Parliamentary Secretary for Health

Mr. Speaker, Health Canada is continuously monitoring the safety of products, but what Health Canada will not do is put a carbon tax on cosmetics or any other health products.

It is important that Canadians get the health products they deserve at a reasonable price. That is why we, as a government, will ensure that Canadians have the maximum amount of money in their pockets so they can take care of themselves.

Government Appointments
Oral Questions

2:45 p.m.

Liberal

Geoff Regan Halifax West, NS

Mr. Speaker, this will be the last week the Treasury Board president sits as a member of Parliament, since this summer he will be appointed a judge in Manitoba. This move will open up a Conservative riding and solve a messy political problem for the Prime Minister, while also giving the Treasury Board president a soft landing and a golden parachute.

However, why are the taxpayers of Manitoba being sent the bill for removing the Prime Minister's political embarrassment?

Government Appointments
Oral Questions

2:45 p.m.

Niagara Falls
Ontario

Conservative

Rob Nicholson Minister of Justice and Attorney General of Canada

Mr. Speaker, I thank the hon. member for his advice on judicial appointments. Again, we never discussed that subject.

However, I can tell members that I am very proud of the 165 outstanding individuals who have been appointed by this government. I can assure him that we will continue to make appointments of the calibre and the quality that we have made in the past.

Government Appointments
Oral Questions

2:45 p.m.

Liberal

Geoff Regan Halifax West, NS

Mr. Speaker, the Treasury Board President selected the panel that would recommend the appointment. He is the regional minister who will approve the appointment. He is a member of the cabinet that will make the appointment.

Does his lordship not see a conflict?