House of Commons Hansard #29 of the 40th Parliament, 2nd Session. (The original version is on Parliament's site.) The word of the day was khadr.

Topics

Justice
Oral Questions

2:50 p.m.

Niagara Falls
Ontario

Conservative

Rob Nicholson Minister of Justice and Attorney General of Canada

Mr. Speaker, the comments by the hon. member are ridiculous. Again, we will not be conducting litigation here on the floor of the House of Commons. However, again I invite this member, and this would be something new for his political party, to start worrying about victims and law-abiding Canadians and get behind the agenda that this Conservative government has presented to Parliament.

Fisheries and Oceans
Oral Questions

2:50 p.m.

Liberal

Gerry Byrne Humber—St. Barbe—Baie Verte, NL

Mr. Speaker, the Minister of Fisheries and Oceans says that the decisions of the independent fisheries licence appeal board should be final and that no further appeals should be warranted. However, she is also prepared to hand out commercial fishing licences this very spring in violation of the findings of that very same board. Tim Rhyno, for example, received a million-dollar crab licence from the Conservatives right before the last election campaign despite being rejected at all three levels of appeal.

The former minister made a decision. Now the present minister has a choice to make. Will she suspend Mr. Rhyno's licence and uphold the principles of her own proposed fisheries act or will she suspend her own fisheries act and approve the licence? What will it be?

Fisheries and Oceans
Oral Questions

2:50 p.m.

Egmont
P.E.I.

Conservative

Gail Shea Minister of Fisheries and Oceans

Mr. Speaker, on any application, extenuating circumstances must be taken into account. Licensing decisions are confidential matters.

Fisheries and Oceans
Oral Questions

2:50 p.m.

Liberal

Gerry Byrne Humber—St. Barbe—Baie Verte, NL

Mr. Speaker, that is very funny because in the proposed act the minister says that there should be no avenue for appeal. She was absolutely adamant about that, as was the previous minister.

The people who are being hurt here are the 28,000 commercial fishermen and plant workers in Atlantic Canada who now have a minister who is prepared to sacrifice conservation and proper stewardship of the resource for the sake of a political gift before the last election campaign.

The industry is facing unparalleled crises in terms of access to capital and access to resources, but as well, reduced markets. Will there be a full inquiry about this particular move, yes or no?

Fisheries and Oceans
Oral Questions

2:50 p.m.

Egmont
P.E.I.

Conservative

Gail Shea Minister of Fisheries and Oceans

Mr. Speaker, as the hon. member knows, the current legislation does give the minister absolute discretion in issuing those licences. I am confident that my predecessor made a good decision of sound judgment.

Municipalities
Oral Questions

March 12th, 2009 / 2:50 p.m.

NDP

Dennis Bevington Western Arctic, NT

Mr. Speaker, this is incredible. Earlier this week, while being interviewed on television, the Minister of Finance said that any misspent funds from the $3 billion slush fund would be clawed back from the municipalities through reductions to the gas tax transfer.

How can the minister say that they will correct the government's mistakes by punishing municipalities?

Municipalities
Oral Questions

2:50 p.m.

Provencher
Manitoba

Conservative

Vic Toews President of the Treasury Board

Mr. Speaker, we are taking unprecedented action in terms of helping municipalities with their infrastructure needs. Those municipalities cannot simply spend that money on anything they want. There are clear criteria and, as in any contract, if the terms and conditions of a contract are broken, the people of Canada need to have recourse to ensure the money has been properly spent.

Municipalities
Oral Questions

2:50 p.m.

NDP

Dennis Bevington Western Arctic, NT

Mr. Speaker, bluster will not cover up this typical Conservative thinking. First the government sets up a fund for backroom deals, then it says that the way it will account for the spending is to place all the responsibilities on Canada's communities. This is not the kind of leadership and accountability that Canadians want.

How can the minister stand and admit to such an underhanded tactic?

Municipalities
Oral Questions

2:50 p.m.

Provencher
Manitoba

Conservative

Vic Toews President of the Treasury Board

Mr. Speaker, that question made absolutely no sense. That member says that there is no accountability and now, when we are bringing out the terms of accountability so that people spend taxpayer money in accordance with the rules and regulations, he says that it should not be done.

Will the member make up his mind? He certainly does not have his questions straight. He does not have his facts straight. Why does he not simply support the budget, get behind these infrastructure programs and help the people of Canada?

International Trade
Oral Questions

2:55 p.m.

Conservative

Ron Cannan Kelowna—Lake Country, BC

Mr. Speaker, Canada's Border Services Agency recently determined that foreign companies were dumping aluminum products into the Canadian market and imposing a 43% penalty on these products.

Would the Minister of International Trade tell the House how this action will preserve Canada's rules based trading relationship with our international partners?

International Trade
Oral Questions

2:55 p.m.

Okanagan—Coquihalla
B.C.

Conservative

Stockwell Day Minister of International Trade and Minister for the Asia-Pacific Gateway

Mr. Speaker, I thank the member for Kelowna—Lake Country for his ongoing concern about Canadian manufacturing and jobs, especially in his constituency.

If there is a situation where it is determined that imports from another country have been dumped into Canada at a cost that is below their production, or if they are subsidized, then, following our rules based system, we are able to assess a countervail or a duty for that. That has been done in this case with certain Chinese aluminum extrusion products.

The Chinese officials are certainly welcome to use the dispute settlement that is there to contest it. I look forward to talking about this with my counterpart in China when I am there in April.

Narcotic Drug Control
Oral Questions

2:55 p.m.

Liberal

Carolyn Bennett St. Paul's, ON

Mr. Speaker, this week, the 52nd session of the committee on narcotic drugs convenes in Vienna. It must deal with the recent world drug report, which stated:

Urgent steps must be taken to prevent the unravelling of progress that has been made in the past few decades of drug control.

Will the minister reassure this House that Canada will not be embarrassed, and bring back a drug policy that is evidence based and in step with our international partners who support the four pillars of prevention, treatment, enforcement and harm reduction?

Narcotic Drug Control
Oral Questions

2:55 p.m.

Niagara Falls
Ontario

Conservative

Rob Nicholson Minister of Justice and Attorney General of Canada

Mr. Speaker, I can tell members that our approach is a complete, comprehensive approach. I would refer the hon. member to the national anti-drug strategy and all the different initiatives this government has taken to assist individuals who have become addicted.

At the same time, we are sending out a very clear message to those individuals who think it is a good idea to get into the grow-op business or who want to get into the import or export of illegal drugs into this country. The message is that they will go to jail.

Agriculture and Agri-Food
Oral Questions

2:55 p.m.

Bloc

André Bellavance Richmond—Arthabaska, QC

Mr. Speaker, Quebec beef producers have received no federal assistance since acquiring the Levinoff-Colbex slaughterhouse. They recently demonstrated their commitment by injecting another $30 million. The Conservatives' election promises and budget announcements have come to naught. Worse still, the Parliamentary Secretary to the Minister of Agriculture stated that the government might provide assistance in the form of repayable loans, but that is not what producers as looking for, as they told us in committee this morning.

Can the minister confirm that Levinoff-Colbex qualifies for the program to strengthen slaughterhouse capacity, and that assistance will be provided in the form of direct funding?

Agriculture and Agri-Food
Oral Questions

2:55 p.m.

Jonquière—Alma
Québec

Conservative

Jean-Pierre Blackburn Minister of National Revenue and Minister of State (Agriculture)

Mr. Speaker, I would like to point out that the budget allocated $50 million to support slaughterhouses and that the regulations are now being drafted. The member must not lose faith.

However, with respect to loan guarantees and subsidies, let me be very clear. There will be no subsidies. These are loans. We are trying to help by taking sensible action, and I believe we are in talks with Levinoff-Colbex, and things are looking good.