House of Commons Hansard #64 of the 40th Parliament, 2nd Session. (The original version is on Parliament's site.) The word of the day was trade.

Topics

Oral Questions
Points of Order
Oral Questions

12:05 p.m.

NDP

Paul Dewar Ottawa Centre, ON

Mr. Speaker, I too want to rise on the same point of order coming out of question period.

I want to ask the Parliamentary Secretary to the Prime Minister to at least understand how that term can be interpreted and why it should not be used. As recently as this past week, Mitt Romney, a former governor in the United States, used the term. He was admonished and he did apologize.

This is an example of perhaps the use of a term that the parliamentary secretary might not have intended to be used in a certain way. However, that can be interpreted and has been interpreted by many African Americans and others that it is a term that should not be used.

To benefit us all, I ask the parliamentary secretary to apologize and to not use the term in the future.

Oral Questions
Points of Order
Oral Questions

12:05 p.m.

Conservative

Pierre Poilievre Nepean—Carleton, ON

Mr. Speaker, I appreciate the hon. member's point. I am perfectly prepared to assure him that is absolutely not what I was referring to. In fact, I have never even heard that term used in the context that he is suggesting.

If anybody is offended because of the way that someone else might have used the term, I can assure the member that was not my intention and never would be.

Oral Questions
Points of Order
Oral Questions

12:05 p.m.

Liberal

Ralph Goodale Wascana, SK

Mr. Speaker, in the interest of laying this issue to rest, I wonder if the parliamentary secretary would not more unequivocally follow the example set not only by former governor Mitt Romney in the United States, but also by Senator John McCain, both of whom on various occasions used those expressions. When it came to their attention that they were inappropriate, they withdrew and they apologized.

Will the parliamentary secretary do the same?

Oral Questions
Points of Order
Oral Questions

12:05 p.m.

Liberal

The Speaker Peter Milliken

The matter has been dealt with and I do not believe it is necessary at this point for further interventions from the Chair.

Government Response to Petitions
Routine Proceedings

12:05 p.m.

Regina—Lumsden—Lake Centre
Saskatchewan

Conservative

Tom Lukiwski Parliamentary Secretary to the Leader of the Government in the House of Commons

Mr. Speaker, pursuant to Standing Order 36(8) I have the honour to table, in both official languages, the government's response to 13 petitions.

Interparliamentary Delegations
Routine Proceedings

12:05 p.m.

Conservative

James Bezan Selkirk—Interlake, MB

Mr. Speaker, pursuant to Standing Order 34(1) I have the honour to present to the House, in both official languages, the report of the Canadian delegation of the Canada-Europe Parliamentary Association respecting its participation in the meeting of the Standing Committee of Parliamentarians of the Arctic Region and the First Northern Dimension Parliamentary Forum held in Brussels, Belgium on February 25 and February 26, 2009.

Government Operations and Estimates
Committees of the House
Routine Proceedings

12:10 p.m.

Lotbinière—Chutes-de-la-Chaudière
Québec

Conservative

Jacques Gourde Parliamentary Secretary to the Minister of Public Works and Government Services and to the Minister of National Revenue

Mr. Speaker, I have the honour to present, in both official languages, two reports of the Standing Committee on Government Operations and Estimates. I will start with the fourth report, on the main estimates for the fiscal year ending March 31, 2010. I am pleased to report to the House that the committee has considered all the votes referred to it and reports the same. Next is the fifth report, on the user fee proposal for services relating to the Esquimalt graving dock.

Telecommunications Act
Routine Proceedings

12:10 p.m.

NDP

Charlie Angus Timmins—James Bay, ON

moved for leave to introduce Bill C-398, An Act to amend the Telecommunications Act (Internet neutrality).

Mr. Speaker, I am pleased to rise today and, with the help of my colleague from Burnaby—New Westminster, introduce this bill that would change section 36 of the Telecommunications Act.

It is very important as Canadians that we maintain the innovation agenda of the Internet. We have known that the importance of the Internet has been based on the principle that all content that moves along the pipes moves at the same rate and that the innovators and the consumers at the end of the pipes are the ones in charge of deciding what content has priority, not the telecom giants. We need to ensure that we are not dealing with the efforts of throttling, interference of traffic on the Internet.

This is a very simple and straightforward bill that would ensure that the telecommunication service provider shall not engage in network management practices that favour, degrade or prioritize any content, application or service transmitted over a broadband network based on its source, ownership, destination or type.

There are, of course, provisions for proper management of the Internet traffic but I think my colleagues will agree that if we are to maintain a 21st century innovation economy, the principle of net neutrality must be protected.

(Motions deemed adopted, bill read the first time and printed)

Main Estimates 2009-10--Finance
Routine Proceedings

12:10 p.m.

Liberal

The Speaker Peter Milliken

The following motion in the name of the hon. Leader of the Opposition is deemed adopted:

That, pursuant to Standing Order 81(4)(b) consideration by the Standing Committee on Finance of Votes 1, 5, L10, 20, 25, 30, 35 and 40 under FINANCE, in the Main Estimates for the fiscal year ending March 31, 2010, be extended beyond May 31, 2009.

(Motion agreed to)

Scrutiny of Regulations
Committees of the House
Routine Proceedings

May 29th, 2009 / 12:10 p.m.

Carleton—Mississippi Mills
Ontario

Conservative

Gordon O'Connor Minister of State and Chief Government Whip

Mr. Speaker, there have been the usual discussions among parties and I believe you would find consent for the following travel motions: I move:

That, in order to attend Australia and New Zealand Scrutiny of Legislation Conference, four members of the Standing Joint Committee on the Scrutiny of Regulations be authorized to travel to Canberra, Australia in July 2009, and that the necessary staff accompany the committee.

Scrutiny of Regulations
Committees of the House
Routine Proceedings

12:10 p.m.

Liberal

The Speaker Peter Milliken

Does the hon. Chief Government Whip have the unanimous consent of the House to propose the motion?

Scrutiny of Regulations
Committees of the House
Routine Proceedings

12:10 p.m.

Some hon. members

Agreed.

Scrutiny of Regulations
Committees of the House
Routine Proceedings

12:10 p.m.

Liberal

The Speaker Peter Milliken

Is it the pleasure of the House to adopt the motion?

Scrutiny of Regulations
Committees of the House
Routine Proceedings

12:10 p.m.

Some hon. members

Agreed.

Scrutiny of Regulations
Committees of the House
Routine Proceedings

12:10 p.m.

Carleton—Mississippi Mills
Ontario

Conservative

Gordon O'Connor Minister of State and Chief Government Whip

(Motion agreed to)