House of Commons Hansard #53 of the 40th Parliament, 2nd Session. (The original version is on Parliament's site.) The word of the day was spam.

Topics

Employment Insurance
Oral Questions

2:35 p.m.

Haldimand—Norfolk
Ontario

Conservative

Diane Finley Minister of Human Resources and Skills Development

Mr. Speaker, no matter how much the hon. member waves her hands, it is not a magic wand that will fix things, unfortunately.

As I just pointed out, we have recognized that things are tough in B.C. and that is why benefits have gone up and access to employment insurance has gone up.

Over 80% of those who have paid into the system and who have lost their jobs involuntarily are able to access those benefits. Even those who are not on EI and who are not eligible can access the $500 million in additional training that we are making available to them so they can have the jobs of the future and increase their opportunities, instead of taxes.

Foreign Affairs
Oral Questions

2:35 p.m.

Bloc

Francine Lalonde La Pointe-de-l'Île, QC

Mr. Speaker, the arguments used by the Conservative government to prevent the return of Mr. Abdelrazik have just been shredded. Richard Barrett, the UN official responsible for monitoring al-Qaeda's activities, stated that Ottawa is mistaken and that Mr. Abdelrazik could be repatriated, even if the aircraft taking him back to Canada flies over other countries.

According to the UN official, if Canada has any doubt, it can go to the security council committee.

Has such a request been made?

Foreign Affairs
Oral Questions

2:35 p.m.

Pontiac
Québec

Conservative

Lawrence Cannon Minister of Foreign Affairs

Mr. Speaker, as I have mentioned on a few occasions, this individual's case is going to be heard by the courts. Representations will be made by both sides. I should add that the fact that this individual's name is on list 1267 does not change anything. He is suspected of being involved with the Taliban and with al-Qaeda. For this reason, he has not been removed from the list. His name is still on that list, regardless.

Foreign Affairs
Oral Questions

2:35 p.m.

Bloc

Francine Lalonde La Pointe-de-l'Île, QC

Mr. Speaker, the government claims that flying over a country is equivalent to transiting through that country, as if going over the United States when flying from Mexico to Canada is transiting through the U.S. One can only stretch the truth so much. Flying over a country is not transiting through that country.

Instead of resorting to all sorts of excuses and meaningless answers, what is the government waiting for to repatriate Mr. Abdelrazik at the earliest opportunity?

Foreign Affairs
Oral Questions

2:35 p.m.

Pontiac
Québec

Conservative

Lawrence Cannon Minister of Foreign Affairs

Mr. Speaker, we are not relying on excuses, or on a convoluted definition that the hon. member would like us to reveal. The fact remains that this person is on a list that is said to include the names of individuals who are suspected of being with al-Qaeda and the Taliban. That person remains on that list, which is made up by the United Nations. We will respect our international commitments and we will state our views before the courts.

Agriculture and Agri-Food
Oral Questions

2:35 p.m.

Bloc

André Bellavance Richmond—Arthabaska, QC

Mr. Speaker, following on the heels of vegetable producers and food processors, poultry producers in Quebec have expressed their concerns about the “Product of Canada” label. Because of a trade agreement with the United States, Canada has to import 3% of its chicks. The new rule prevents poultry producers from marking their products with “Product of Canada” because of this 3% that is imported, which violates the 98% Canadian content rule.

Will the Minister of Agriculture and Agri-Food stop being so stubborn and review this ridiculous rule?

Agriculture and Agri-Food
Oral Questions

2:35 p.m.

Jonquière—Alma
Québec

Conservative

Jean-Pierre Blackburn Minister of National Revenue and Minister of State (Agriculture)

Mr. Speaker, once again, I want to remind the member that our goal is to make consumers aware of what they are getting when they purchase products on supermarket shelves. As for the 98% Canadian content requirement, consultations were held with the industry, and people were in favour of this. That does not mean that problems will not arise. We can always look at the situation. But we have to remember that for a product to be marked as Canadian, it must have 98% Canadian content. Otherwise, it can be marked with “Made in Canada” or “Made in Canada from Lac Saint-Jean blueberries”. That is always possible.

Agriculture and Agri-Food
Oral Questions

2:40 p.m.

Bloc

André Bellavance Richmond—Arthabaska, QC

Mr. Speaker, it would be great if the real Minister of Agriculture and Agri-Food could come out of his shell and meet with poultry producers on the ground. They will tell him that his measure is out in left field and that this rule does not make any sense.

The Minister of State for Agriculture told producers, and I quote: “We will review any wording you are not happy with.” He said that. Yet in this House, he says—and he said it again just moments ago—that the government is going ahead with this.

Who will have the courage to admit that this new rule is a mistake and must be changed? Who?

Agriculture and Agri-Food
Oral Questions

2:40 p.m.

Jonquière—Alma
Québec

Conservative

Jean-Pierre Blackburn Minister of National Revenue and Minister of State (Agriculture)

Mr. Speaker, I had an opportunity to meet with poultry producers, and they told me about this situation. I want to say again that these people and all the stakeholders in the processing industry were consulted. They also knew that we were trying to clarify things for consumers. That does not mean that there will not be any problems. This sort of thing happens when legislation is amended. Our goal is still to let consumers know what they are getting and for this to be clear for everyone. But we are still listening.

Forestry Industry
Oral Questions

May 7th, 2009 / 2:40 p.m.

Liberal

Geoff Regan Halifax West, NS

Mr. Speaker, the Conservative government has abandoned thousands of families that are suffering because of growing job losses in the forestry sector. The industry was virtually ignored in the budget, and it is clear it has been written off by the government.

Its silence is stunning when it comes to the $860 million in direct subsidies being given to the U.S. pulp and paper industry. Why is it missing in action when it should be standing up for our forestry workers?

Forestry Industry
Oral Questions

2:40 p.m.

Halton
Ontario

Conservative

Lisa Raitt Minister of Natural Resources

Mr. Speaker, in fact this government has acted very quickly. We have also acted very convincingly in how we are supporting the forestry industry.

I thank the member for the question, though, on this specific point, because I think it is important to discuss it in a clean manner. The subsidy to which the member is referring is one we are taking very seriously. In fact I have written to the secretary of energy, Mr. Chu, on the issue.

It is something that does cause us concern domestically in terms of our competitiveness, and we are taking a look at all the options available.

I offer my ability to speak with the member to keep him updated on the matter.

Forestry Industry
Oral Questions

2:40 p.m.

Liberal

Anthony Rota Nipissing—Timiskaming, ON

Mr. Speaker, one after another, kraft pulp mills in Canada are closing their doors: AbitibiBowater in Thunder Bay, Domtar in Dryden, and now Fraser Papers in Thurso.

The Americans subsidize their mills by providing a tax credit on black liquor equivalent to 60% of the cost of production. That is killing Canadian mills.

Why does the Prime Minister have nothing to say about this? Why has he abandoned Canadian workers?

Forestry Industry
Oral Questions

2:40 p.m.

Halton
Ontario

Conservative

Lisa Raitt Minister of Natural Resources

Mr. Speaker, I definitely think it is important to understand the facts associated with this subsidy. In reality what is happening is that a tax subsidy that is there in order to encourage the use of clean energy in the United States is being utilized. It is taking away from the green energy and actually utilizing fossil fuel in order to gain this tax subsidy. That is something we find unacceptable. We have written the secretary about this, in the United States.

We are looking at our options here in order to deal with the domestic forestry industry. Indeed, we are in contact with the industry, and we are working with it on options.

International Trade
Oral Questions

2:40 p.m.

Liberal

Scott Brison Kings—Hants, NS

Mr. Speaker, thousands of Canadian jobs are at risk because of U.S. protectionism.

Yesterday the industry minister was absolutely wrong when he said that the government only needs to make sure the Americans live up to their trade obligations. What the minister did not know was that NAFTA and WTO trade rules do not protect Canada against U.S. state and local government protectionism.

Why does the Conservative government not understand its own free trade agreements, and when will it start fighting for and protecting Canadian jobs?

International Trade
Oral Questions

2:40 p.m.

South Shore—St. Margaret's
Nova Scotia

Conservative

Gerald Keddy Parliamentary Secretary to the Minister of International Trade

Mr. Speaker, nothing could be further from the truth. The reality is that the Canadian government and the Minister of International Trade have been protecting Canadian jobs and standing up for Canadian industry in the United States.

We expect President Obama to live up to his own words and his own standards. He said that protectionism is a slippery slope, that it is the wrong thing to do in the world economy and it will only lead to more protectionism around the world. We expect fair rules, fair trade and free trade with the Americans.