House of Commons Hansard #43 of the 40th Parliament, 3rd Session. (The original version is on Parliament's site.) The word of the day was pumps.

Topics

Justice
Oral Questions

2:40 p.m.

Liberal

John McCallum Markham—Unionville, ON

Mr. Speaker, the question had nothing to do about the member and everything to do with confidence in our financial system and fairness in the housing market.

Worse, our Criminal Intelligence Service says organized crime often uses the money it steals from mortgage fraud to fund its other criminal activities. But the Conservatives seem content to let mortgage fraud go unpunished, even uninvestigated.

When will the government provide the RCMP with the tools that it needs and why does it refuse to bring forward meaningful white collar crime legislation? That is the question.

Justice
Oral Questions

2:40 p.m.

Macleod
Alberta

Conservative

Ted Menzies Parliamentary Secretary to the Minister of Finance

Mr. Speaker, every time we bring forward meaningful white collar crime legislation, it seems to get stalled, whether it is the Liberals or whether it is the rest of the opposition.

We are talking about confidence, so let us talk about confidence. I will read a quote from the member for Markham—Unionville. He said: “I was wrong. I can admit when I was wrong. Ten years ago I was in favour of bank mergers. I believed it, but in hindsight having seen the financial crisis, having seen that the Royal Bank wanted to grow up to be Citibank and having seen what happened to Citibank, I've acknowledged for some time now--”.

Justice
Oral Questions

2:40 p.m.

Liberal

The Speaker Peter Milliken

The hon. member for Beauséjour.

Justice
Oral Questions

2:40 p.m.

Liberal

Dominic LeBlanc Beauséjour, NB

Mr. Speaker, the government likes to say it is against white collar criminals, but it continues to deprive the RCMP and the Department of Justice of the resources they need to establish an effective strategy against these criminals.

The RCMP's commercial crime unit is underfunded and federal prosecutors are quitting because the government has reduced their salaries.

When will the Conservatives start putting their words into actions? When will the Conservatives tackle the real problem of white collar criminals?

Justice
Oral Questions

2:40 p.m.

Oxford
Ontario

Conservative

Dave MacKenzie Parliamentary Secretary to the Minister of Public Safety

Mr. Speaker, my colleague opposite is full of water, wind and such, but on this side of the House we do not direct the RCMP as to what it should or should not investigate. The RCMP will make those decisions on its ability and what it does best.

Justice
Oral Questions

2:40 p.m.

Liberal

Dominic LeBlanc Beauséjour, NB

Mr. Speaker, untold billions are spent on new prisons when the RCMP and federal prosecutor are starved of the resources necessary to actually investigate and prosecute large scale mortgage fraud.

The government wrongly pretends that every crime is solved by simply increasing sentencing, instead of actually catching and convicting those involved in large scale fraud, like the one that hit BMO in Alberta.

Why is the government ignoring serious white collar crime?

Justice
Oral Questions

2:45 p.m.

Oxford
Ontario

Conservative

Dave MacKenzie Parliamentary Secretary to the Minister of Public Safety

Mr. Speaker, the member opposite forgot a couple of important ingredients. We did increase funding for the RCMP and we increased the numbers of the RCMP, but he voted against that.

However, the RCMP and everyone else in Canada would like to know where that $39 million are.

Broadband Internet
Oral Questions

2:45 p.m.

Conservative

Dick Harris Cariboo—Prince George, BC

Mr. Speaker, the broadband Internet access is hugely important to the social and economic success of our country.

Last week, the Liberal opposition member tried to drudge up a 10-year-old broken promise about broadband that the Liberals broke 10 years ago and likely would again. This government, on the other hand, is taking some real action.

I would like to ask the Minister of Industry to explain what the Conservative government is doing to help rural Canadians be competitive in the digital economy of the 21st century.

Broadband Internet
Oral Questions

2:45 p.m.

Parry Sound—Muskoka
Ontario

Conservative

Tony Clement Minister of Industry

Mr. Speaker, on Mothers' Day yesterday, I was pleased to announce the first series of projects under the broadband Canada program. The 52 initial projects in nine provinces and territories will bring broadband Internet access to an estimated 168,000 households. They will soon have access to the economic and social benefits of high speed Internet service for the first time.

Thanks to this government, Canada continues to make great strides in the digital economy. The difference between us and the guys on the other side is that we keep our promises.

Government Programs
Oral Questions

May 10th, 2010 / 2:45 p.m.

NDP

Paul Dewar Ottawa Centre, ON

Mr. Speaker, the G8 and G20 summits in Canada provide a unique opportunity to address major global challenges like growing poverty, catastrophic climate change and the crisis in the financial system.

Our global partners are putting forward solutions for these challenges but the Conservatives are just shooting them down.

One cannot honestly say no to everything unless one brings one's own ideas to the table. Where is the plan, where is the new money for it and when will the Conservatives tell Canadians what they will do in all of these areas?

Government Programs
Oral Questions

2:45 p.m.

Thornhill
Ontario

Conservative

Peter Kent Minister of State of Foreign Affairs (Americas)

Mr. Speaker, I am glad to answer my hon. colleague's question but he is coming at it from exactly the opposite of reality.

There are several areas where G20 actions will remain vital: in the area of financial sector reform, implementing stimulus measures, promoting reforms to the international financial institutions and ensuring that they have the resources and the tools they need for global trade and growth strategies.

Government Programs
Oral Questions

2:45 p.m.

NDP

Paul Dewar Ottawa Centre, ON

Mr. Speaker, I was hoping for some real concrete action but what I got was a regurgitation of talking points. If the Conservatives are not careful, we will be having the Seinfeld summits here in Canada instead of real action on these problems.

At a time when we need sensible leadership on the global stage, we have the exact opposite. Worse yet, the Conservatives are standing in the way of even considering some of the solutions that have been put forward.

Why can the Conservatives not be honest with Canadians? They travel around the world and they host summits but at the end of the day they do not have a concrete plan. Where is the concrete plan on financial reforms, global poverty and on the environment?

Government Programs
Oral Questions

2:45 p.m.

Durham
Ontario

Conservative

Bev Oda Minister of International Cooperation

Mr. Speaker, we know what we will be doing. Every day in the developing world over 1,100 mothers die and 24,000 children are dying. Our government's G8 initiatives on security, protection and maternal health will be to save lives and make the world better.

In the time that the member asked his question, eight children have died. Our government wants to change that. We do not want to continue divisive debates. We want to encourage all members in the House to ensure we save lives and make developing countries flourish.

Afghanistan
Oral Questions

2:45 p.m.

Bloc

Claude Bachand Saint-Jean, QC

Mr. Speaker, the report by Rear Admiral Maddison, head of the inquiry into the fate of a prisoner beaten by Afghan police, confirmed that the Canadian government knew, as early as 2006, that detainees turned over to local authorities were at risk of being tortured.

How can this government continue to deny violating the Geneva convention when it handed over a number of Afghan detainees to be tortured?

Afghanistan
Oral Questions

2:50 p.m.

Central Nova
Nova Scotia

Conservative

Peter MacKay Minister of National Defence

Mr. Speaker, Rear Admiral Maddison said that “all of the critical witnesses required to build a comprehensive and complete reconstitution of events as they occurred on the 14th of June were brought to the board. So the board was absolutely confident that we had what was required to make the findings”.

I have another interesting quote from Arif Lalani, a former ambassador in Afghanistan, who said, “I am very confident that during the time I was there and when I left we were meeting our obligations”.