House of Commons Hansard #53 of the 41st Parliament, 1st Session. (The original version is on Parliament's site.) The word of the day was artists.

Topics

Health
Oral Questions

2:50 p.m.

Liberal

Geoff Regan Halifax West, NS

Mr. Speaker, I guess they are sad that they were not invited.

One key recommendation was for Health Canada to fund a drug shortages monitoring system similar to the FDA's in the U.S.

Will the government commit to this first step, or does it still think that timely access for prescription medication, as listed in the 2004 health accord, is not its responsibility?

Health
Oral Questions

2:55 p.m.

Oshawa
Ontario

Conservative

Colin Carrie Parliamentary Secretary to the Minister of Health

Mr. Speaker, that was the problem when the Liberals were in government. All they ever did was hold round tables. They never took action.

Our government is way ahead of the Americans. We are playing a leadership role when it comes to the drug shortage issue around the world.

This summer the minister talked to drug companies and said that if they did not take action, the government would look at regulations.

I am pleased to report to the House that these companies have responded positively to our request. Information about drug shortages will soon be available on public websites, giving patients and medical professionals the information they need to make decisions. The final details are being worked out--

Health
Oral Questions

2:55 p.m.

Conservative

The Speaker Andrew Scheer

Order. The hon. member for St. Paul's.

Aboriginal Affairs
Oral Questions

2:55 p.m.

Liberal

Carolyn Bennett St. Paul's, ON

Mr. Speaker, today first nations communities are taking the federal government to court in order to seek justice in the egregious underfunding of first nations schools. Communities like Attawapiskat still have no school, something which Shannen Koostachin so bravely fought for.

Provinces typically spend about $12,000 per student in non-aboriginal schools. The federal government spends only $8,000 per year per student in first nations schools.

Will the Minister of Aboriginal Affairs and Northern Development acknowledge that this funding inequity is actually discrimination, and commit immediately—

Aboriginal Affairs
Oral Questions

2:55 p.m.

Conservative

The Speaker Andrew Scheer

The hon. Minister of Aboriginal Affairs and Northern Development.

Aboriginal Affairs
Oral Questions

2:55 p.m.

Vancouver Island North
B.C.

Conservative

John Duncan Minister of Aboriginal Affairs and Northern Development

Mr. Speaker, in terms of first nations education across the country, we have obviously taken this very seriously. We have made it a priority.

I cannot comment on the litigation that has come forward; once there is litigation, obviously we cannot do that.

In terms of the school in Attawapiskat, we have made a commitment. It is under way. Even the member for Timmins—James Bay said that it could not be done any faster. We are doing the right thing.

Transport
Oral Questions

2:55 p.m.

NDP

Élaine Michaud Portneuf—Jacques-Cartier, QC

Mr. Speaker, the people of Neuville are worried about an airport being built in their area, but the Minister of Transport, Infrastructure and Communities has consistently refused to meet with the mayor because this apparently is not his jurisdiction.

He should probably tell his staffer, who told the mayor of Neuville last week that he would organize a meeting. Perhaps the issue is that no one knows what falls under the minister's jurisdiction.

Will the minister finally commit to meeting with mayors who are worried about the effects of the Carriage by Air Act?

Transport
Oral Questions

2:55 p.m.

Roberval—Lac-Saint-Jean
Québec

Conservative

Denis Lebel Minister of Transport

Mr. Speaker, our government has a tremendous amount of respect for provincial and municipal jurisdictions in Quebec. This member does not understand that the city is responsible for what happens within a municipal region. The mayor and the city council have an agreement. The city signed an agreement with the developer to minimize the effects of the construction.

Could we talk about federal jurisdiction in the House and allow those in other jurisdictions to do their jobs?

Veterans
Oral Questions

2:55 p.m.

NDP

Annick Papillon Québec, QC

Mr. Speaker, it took a veteran's desperate act to make the minister agree to establish a consultative committee on veterans' health.

The minister promised Pascal Lacoste that the committee would be set up by December 8. That is in two weeks' time. However, we have heard absolutely nothing since he made the announcement. All we know is that the first topic of study will be the effects of exposure to depleted uranium.

Can the minister tell us who will sit on the committee in question and can he commit to tabling the committee's report in the House?

Veterans
Oral Questions

2:55 p.m.

Lévis—Bellechasse
Québec

Conservative

Steven Blaney Minister of Veterans Affairs

Mr. Speaker, on this side of the House, when it is time to vote for our veterans, we rise and support the budget initiatives to help them. Furthermore, when it is time to help veterans, as I helped Mr. Lacoste, we extend our hand to them. We are prepared to provide him with treatment and an assessment that meet his needs and those of his brothers in arms. I made the commitment and hon. members will have to stay tuned: the veterans' health committee will be set up by December 8.

Aboriginal Affairs
Oral Questions

November 24th, 2011 / 2:55 p.m.

Conservative

LaVar Payne Medicine Hat, AB

Mr. Speaker, first nations members have been calling for the same accountability and transparency from their elected officials that all Canadians expect and deserve.

Despite fierce opposition from the NDP and the Liberals, our government is taking action to ensure that first nations people can access financial information about their chiefs and councillors, and take real steps toward democratic and economic change.

Could the Minister of Aboriginal Affairs and Northern Development tell the House how our government is addressing this issue?

Aboriginal Affairs
Oral Questions

3 p.m.

Vancouver Island North
B.C.

Conservative

John Duncan Minister of Aboriginal Affairs and Northern Development

Mr. Speaker, our government believes that first nations, like all Canadians, deserve transparency and accountability from their elected officials.

The first nations transparency and accountability act builds on our government's ongoing commitment to ensuring first nations have strong, transparent and accountable governments. It will also decrease the reporting burden.

We have listened to community members who have repeatedly said this is necessary for their communities. I am proud that our government is taking action, which has been long overdue.

Search and Rescue
Oral Questions

3 p.m.

Liberal

Stéphane Dion Saint-Laurent—Cartierville, QC

Mr. Speaker, the Minister of Veterans Affairs, he who stands side by side with our brave veterans, must know that when one's life is in danger, it is a human reaction to want to speak in one's mother tongue, with one's accent, with someone who understands us and knows the danger we are facing.

What is the minister going to do to prevent Quebec from being divided in two, with half going to Trenton and the other half going to Halifax, and to ensure that this rescue centre, located across from his riding, can continue to save lives on the St. Lawrence River and in the Gulf of St. Lawrence?

Search and Rescue
Oral Questions

3 p.m.

Fredericton
New Brunswick

Conservative

Keith Ashfield Minister of Fisheries and Oceans and Minister for the Atlantic Gateway

Mr. Speaker, in terms of the sub-centre in Quebec City, the member can rest assured that the services provided in Trenton will have fully bilingual people trained to perform that duty. There will be no jeopardy on safety and security.

Lapierre Island
Oral Questions

3 p.m.

NDP

Paulina Ayala Honoré-Mercier, QC

Mr. Speaker, under the ecological gift program, businessman Alfonso Argento donated Île Lapierre and walked away with nearly $14 million. The island is covered in garbage and no longer has any ecological value. All the officials who worked on the file have said so. The land was last evaluated at less than $400,000.

How could the Government of Canada have determined a market value of $14 million, when no assessment agrees with that amount?