House of Commons Hansard #54 of the 41st Parliament, 1st Session. (The original version is on Parliament's site.) The word of the day was french.

Topics

Egypt
Statements by Members

11 a.m.

Liberal

Irwin Cotler Mount Royal, QC

Mr. Speaker, Maikel Nabil is a young Egyptian blogger, one of the early voices of the Tahrir Square revolution, whose words, “the army and the people are of one hand”, symbolized the hopes of the Egyptian Arab Spring. When the military started oppressing civilians, Nabil wrote, “the army and the people are no longer of one hand”, for which he was sentenced by a military tribunal to three years in prison in a process devoid of any legality.

Maikel is now on the 95th day of his hunger strike. He has become a symbol of hope and betrayal of an Egyptian Spring turned Winter, his life hanging by a thread.

I know all colleagues will join me in urging the Egyptian authorities to immediately release him and vindicate the original hopes of the Egyptian Arab Spring.

Justice
Statements by Members

11 a.m.

Conservative

Maurice Vellacott Saskatoon—Wanuskewin, SK

Mr. Speaker, Canadians are rightfully concerned when the practice of polygamy is exposed in the country.

Polygamy has been linked to a consistent set of harms, including: physical and sexual abuse; physical, reproductive and mental health harms; economic deprivation; lower levels of education; inequality, including both gender inequality and marginalization of young men; decreased political rights and civil liberties; and the commodification and objectification of women. The harmful effects of polygamy justify the criminal law ban.

That is why our government has vigorously defended the prohibition against polygamy in the Criminal Code. It is a practice which inevitably leads to the exploitation of women and young girls. This is unacceptable to our party and to our government. We have already acted to raise the age of sexual consent from 14 to 16 and currently have legislation before the House that will crack down on a wide variety of child sexual offences.

I would like to assure all Canadians that they can count on our government to stand up for these important values.

Natural Resources
Statements by Members

11 a.m.

Conservative

Brian Jean Fort McMurray—Athabasca, AB

Mr. Speaker, this week we have some great news for workers in Canada and the United States. The state of Nebraska and TransCanada Pipelines have agreed to find a route for Keystone pipeline through Nebraska.

Keystone, when approved, means 20,000 immediate construction jobs in the United States and tens of thousands of jobs in Canada. It will be the safest transportation method for oil in the world, oil from an ethical, safe, democracy that believes in equal rights for all and the rule of law for its citizens.

Yes, the NDP asked the Americans to stop the pipeline and kill tens of thousands of Canadian jobs. It is hard to believe the NDP would work to kill Canadian jobs and would encourage the purchase of oil from countries that do not allow women to vote, do not believe in individual rights and have many of their citizens live in fear and poverty.

Why would the NDP members do this? It is obvious they want to play politics with the lives of Canadians. They are not in it for Canadians; they are in it for themselves. They are not fit to govern.

Global Buy Nothing Day
Statements by Members

11:05 a.m.

NDP

Isabelle Morin Notre-Dame-de-Grâce—Lachine, QC

Mr. Speaker, today is Global Buy Nothing Day.

We wish to recognize this day as an opportunity to reflect on the issue of overconsumption and how consumerism in wealthy countries affects the planet as a whole in terms of its social, economic and ecological impact.

At present, 20% of the world's population consumes 80% of all global resources. In every country, people are suffering because they cannot get the basic resources they need to live comfortably. In certain regions of the world, some people do not even have access to food every day and many children are suffering as a result.

Global Buy Nothing Day is not meant to hurt the economy, but it is an opportunity for people to reflect on how lucky we are to be able to buy things every day without even thinking about it.

I would like to congratulate an organization in my riding, the Coop la Maison verte, which is marking this event on Sunday by inviting its members to gather at the co-op to raise awareness, without buying anything. It is very important that we all pay attention to our consumption habits and make responsible decisions.

Grey Cup
Statements by Members

11:05 a.m.

Conservative

Andrew Saxton North Vancouver, BC

Mr. Speaker, this Sunday millions of Canadians from coast to coast to coast will turn their eyes toward beautiful British Columbia for the 99th Grey Cup. This annual sporting event is one of the oldest in the world.

However, as millions of Canadians know, the Grey Cup is about more than just football. For almost 100 years, the Grey Cup has helped bring our country together. Serving as Canada's unofficial fall festival, the Grey Cup affords an opportunity for all Canadians to come together to celebrate an event that is uniquely Canadian.

I have had the opportunity since 2004 to be a member of the B.C. alliance family as a member of the support group, the “Waterboys”. The Lions, which had its first season in 1954, is the oldest professional sports team in British Columbia and is a valuable and important member of our community.

This weekend, along with millions in British Columbia, I will be cheering on the team members of the Lions as they attempt to win their sixth Grey Cup. Go Lions go.

Religious Freedom
Statements by Members

11:05 a.m.

Conservative

Deepak Obhrai Calgary East, AB

Mr. Speaker, from November 16 to 19, I joined the Governor General on a state visit to Vietnam. This visit was the first ever state visit to Vietnam. This visit was to continue establishing our growing relations in trade, education and cultural ties.

While these ties are growing, nevertheless our concerns regarding human rights, the rule of law, religious freedom and promotion of democracy remain. During our bilateral meeting with the president, I emphasized these principles as a major platform of our foreign policy. I also informed him of our plans to open an office of religious freedom.

The next day, on our visit to Ho Chi Minh City, I then paid a visit to the parents of Nguyen Tien Trung, who has been sentenced to 16 years for advocating more democracy. I inquired about Mr. Nguyen's well-being.

Canada recognizes the desire of Vietnam to be a member of the international community. However, it needs to show that it has taken concrete steps to address its shortcomings in human rights, the rule of law, religious freedom and promotion of democracy. Canada is ready to assist.

Grey Cup
Statements by Members

11:05 a.m.

NDP

Pat Martin Winnipeg Centre, MB

Mr. Speaker, this Sunday the big blue machine will descend on the hapless and unsuspecting B.C. Lions and regain its rightful ownership of the Grey Cup.

The Winnipeg Blue Bombers have a great history and tradition of triumph and victory. In 1935 it was the first team west of Ontario to ever win the Grey Cup. Since then, it has contested for the championship no fewer than 24 times, one of the best records in the league. The 1950s and 1960s were golden years for the blue and gold, with four Grey Cup victories in five seasons, and we christened “The House that Jack Built”, the stadium that our team has called home until this very season.

The Winnipeg Blue Bombers are the pride of the Prairies, with the most devoted and passionate fans in the league. We love our team and our team has always made us proud.

I know that Sunday, November 27, the 99th CFL Grey Cup will be a great day and a historic event, as the big blue machine brings the Grey Cup back where it belongs: to the corner of Portage and Main.

Violence Against Women
Statements by Members

November 25th, 2011 / 11:05 a.m.

Conservative

John Weston West Vancouver—Sunshine Coast—Sea to Sky Country, BC

Mr. Speaker, today is International Day for the Elimination of Violence Against Women. Today also marks the beginning of 16 days of activism to combat violence against women here in Canada and around the world. This period of activism will end on Human Rights Day on December 10.

Violence against women affects everyone. It destroys families, undermines our social fabric, harms our communities and hinders our economy.

Our government made this problem a priority in the Speech from the Throne. Since 2007, the government has invested more than $39 million in projects to address this situation.

These 16 days of activism remind us to do everything we can to eliminate violence against women and girls, today and always.

Tadoussac Song Festival
Statements by Members

11:10 a.m.

NDP

Jonathan Tremblay Montmorency—Charlevoix—Haute-Côte-Nord, QC

Mr. Speaker, the Festival de la chanson de Tadoussac has been celebrating French song for 28 years. This event features emerging artists who perform various types of music and it attracts people from everywhere, close to 38,000 in 2010. The festival's economic spinoffs exceed $1.7 million. This shows how the festival has expanded over the years.

During the Canadian Tourism Awards Gala, which took place on November 24 in Ottawa, the Festival de la chanson de Tadoussac was a finalist for the national award for cultural tourism. I want to acknowledge this recognition, which is the result of the hard work the organizers and volunteers have put in to make this festival a model to follow.

Congratulations and long live the Festival de la chanson de Tadoussac.

Tim Hortons in Kandahar
Statements by Members

11:10 a.m.

Conservative

Leon Benoit Vegreville—Wainwright, AB

Mr. Speaker, a piece of home for Canadians serving in Afghanistan is now coming home.

The Tim Hortons outlet at Kandahar airfield is closing after boosting soldiers' spirits for over five years. Civilian personnel hired by the Canadian Forces poured over four million coffees and half a million iced capps and served over three million doughnuts. Many of these civilians did multiple tours in Afghanistan.

The Tim Hortons on base provided a meeting place for soldiers from all nations. It was a place to sip on some coffee and have some good conversation. For many, it was a home away from home.

How many Canadians know this: all the proceeds from the Kandahar Tim Hortons went to support our troops and their families.

We salute and thank Tim Hortons for its support of our men and women in uniform.

We salute and thank the civilian personnel whose commitment made life a little easier for those for serve.

We salute and thank our brave men and women of the Canadian Forces who answer the call to duty each and every day.

A Hare in the Elephant's Trunk
Statements by Members

11:10 a.m.

Liberal

Scott Brison Kings—Hants, NS

Mr. Speaker, Jan Coates is a children's author and teacher from Wolfville, Nova Scotia, who has been writing for children since 2000.

This year her book “A Hare in the Elephant's Trunk” was one of five finalists for the 2011 Governor General's Literary Award--Children's Text.

The novel for young adults is based on the life of Jacob Deng, who as a seven-year-old in southern Sudan embarked on a journey of survival. Jacob fled from a civil war, lived in a refugee camp, endured hunger and aspired to an education as a path away from violence.

In 2003 Jacob arrived in Nova Scotia as a refugee. He has since studied at both Acadia University and St. Mary's University and has established a charitable foundation, Wadeng Wings of Hope, to build schools in Sudan. Forty per cent of the proceeds from the sales of Jan's books is donated to Jacob's charity.

Jacob's life is a story of courage, and Jan's book about it is a lesson on life for all of those who read it.

Congratulations, Jan and Jacob.

Taxation
Statements by Members

11:10 a.m.

Conservative

Ryan Leef Yukon, YT

Mr. Speaker, the member for Vancouver Quadra is calling for Canada to impose a European-style carbon tax. The member for Saint-Laurent—Cartierville wants a global carbon tax. The Liberal scheme for a job-killing carbon tax on everything is back on the table.

If the Liberals had their way, Canadians would be paying substantially more for gas in their cars, electricity for their homes and everything else they buy.

Canadians must not forget the Liberals' hidden agenda of imposing a massive new tax on everything if they get their chance.

It is not just carbon taxes. Recently their interim leader called for the end of tax credits for children, transit users and workers, and despite the current global economic uncertainty, the Liberals continue to call for higher taxes on job creators.

It is clear that the Liberal Party still has no new ideas other than higher taxes for Canadian families.

G8 Summit
Statements by Members

11:10 a.m.

NDP

Charlie Angus Timmins—James Bay, ON

Mr. Speaker, the Conservatives were elected on a promise to clean up Ottawa. Instead, the Muskoka minister gets his hands on a $50 million slush fund. He runs the program through his constituency office. He hides the documents from the Auditor General. Then, when he is pressed for an explanation by committee, he claims that he had no role in the review of the projects. Two hundred and forty-two projects magically became 32. That is simply not true.

We have his letters of rejection to the municipalities. He said in the House that he handed all of the documents to the Auditor General. That is not true. The Auditor General told committee that she was given only a few unrelated documents.

Where is the outrage from Conservative backbenchers on behalf of Canadian taxpayers? Why are they sitting on their hands? Those Conservatives came to Ottawa to change Ottawa, but instead Ottawa changed them. They are now worse than the party they replaced.

New Democratic Party of Canada
Statements by Members

11:15 a.m.

Conservative

Ted Opitz Etobicoke Centre, ON

Mr. Speaker, while our Conservative government is focused on creating and protecting jobs with our low-tax plan and job-creating measures such as the hiring credit for small business, the NDP is constantly opposing them and thus opposing helping Canadian families.

In the coming months, Canadians will endure countless NDP leadership debates. The candidates will each be looking to lead Canada's socialist movement. However, even before the debate, we already know what most NDP leadership candidates want to do for the economy and Canadian taxpayers, and workers everywhere should be very afraid.

First, they want to kill jobs by hiking taxes on employers by nearly $10 billion a year. Second, they want to impose a new tax on everyday financial transactions. Third, they want to increase personal taxes. Fourth, they want to hike taxes on everyone by implementing a higher GST. The list of tax hikes and ill-considered schemes goes on and on.

When it comes to the NDP and the economy, Canadians know that means three things--

New Democratic Party of Canada
Statements by Members

11:15 a.m.

Conservative

The Speaker Andrew Scheer

Order, please.

Oral questions, the hon. member for Burnaby—New Westminster.