House of Commons Hansard #44 of the 41st Parliament, 1st Session. (The original version is on Parliament's site.) The word of the day was military.

Topics

Firearms Registry
Oral Questions

11:40 a.m.

NDP

Pierre Jacob Brome—Missisquoi, QC

Mr. Speaker, that is not an acceptable answer for the victims of the shooting at the École Polytechnique or for victims of other shootings. The gun registry is essential to public safety. The provinces and chiefs of police have said it over and over. They use the registry every day, yet this government is willing to get rid of the data in the registry for no good reason.

Will the government reverse its reckless decision so that we can avoid another shooting like the one at the École Polytechnique?

Firearms Registry
Oral Questions

11:40 a.m.

Portage—Lisgar
Manitoba

Conservative

Candice Bergen Parliamentary Secretary to the Minister of Public Safety

Mr. Speaker, on this side of the House we are very proud to have 11 active police officers and former police officers in our party. We listen to police officers. That is why we have given provisions, for example in Bill C-10, that would actually help fight violent crime and gun crime. We want to focus on ensuring guns do not get into the wrong hands and that those kinds of tragedies that happened in Montreal will not happen again. The long gun registry does nothing to keep guns out of people's hands.

The Economy
Oral Questions

11:45 a.m.

Conservative

Rick Norlock Northumberland—Quinte West, ON

Mr. Speaker, today we are reminded of how fragile the global economic recovery is and how that will impact Canada. Even though it is from outside our borders, we recognize the ongoing economic weakness in the United States and the very real economic consequences caused by European governments that ran massive deficits that will all be a challenge for Canada.

While the NDP, disappointingly, wants to engage in reckless, free-wheeling deficit spending, the type hurting Europe now, this government has a responsible plan. Could the parliamentary secretary talk about our responsible plan for the economy and jobs?

The Economy
Oral Questions

11:45 a.m.

Saint Boniface
Manitoba

Conservative

Shelly Glover Parliamentary Secretary to the Minister of Finance

Mr. Speaker, while Canada's economy has created nearly 600,000 net new jobs since July 2009, we do sympathize with Canadians who have recently lost their jobs.

As we have said all along, we are not immune to the global economic turbulence being felt by our largest trading partners, Europe and the United States. As witnessed by events this week in Greece, the global economic recovery remains very fragile.

That is why we are working to implement the next phase of Canada's economic action plan with measures to help protect and create jobs, such as the hiring credit for small businesses. While the NDP is voting against all of those measures and the economy, our Conservative government will continue to do what is necessary and responsible to protect Canadians—

The Economy
Oral Questions

11:45 a.m.

Conservative

The Speaker Andrew Scheer

The hon. member for Abitibi—Témiscamingue.

National Defence
Oral Questions

11:45 a.m.

NDP

Christine Moore Abitibi—Témiscamingue, QC

Mr. Speaker, the list of problems with the catastrophic F-35 program just keeps on growing. The safety of our pilots is compromised, costs are skyrocketing, the planes do not meet our needs and they cost so much that we cannot buy as many as we need.

My question is simple. How can a plane that is slower than the one it is replacing, that could injure or even kill our pilots, and that we cannot communicate with in the Canadian north actually be the best for our troops?

National Defence
Oral Questions

11:45 a.m.

Vaughan
Ontario

Conservative

Julian Fantino Associate Minister of National Defence

Mr. Speaker, the extensive and rigorous competition has taken place. Two airplanes squared off, and the F-35 won the competition. That is the best aircraft for our men and women well into the future and to ensure that our sovereignty is maintained in the future, as well.

National Defence
Oral Questions

11:45 a.m.

NDP

David Christopherson Hamilton Centre, ON

Mr. Speaker, the procurement tailspin continues.

Now we learn our pilots will not even be able to learn how to fly the F-35s in Canada. According to DND documents, pilot training will have to be moved from Cold Lake, Alberta to a facility in Florida run by Lockheed Martin.

The government is throwing billions at a plane that cannot fly here for pilots who cannot train here. Why is the government buying planes that take training jobs out of Canadian cities? Why is it abandoning Cold Lake?

National Defence
Oral Questions

11:45 a.m.

Vaughan
Ontario

Conservative

Julian Fantino Associate Minister of National Defence

Mr. Speaker, the member should know that in order to get traction, he should have his facts straight.

Long-term training on the F-35s will take place in Canada, just as currently is done with the CF-18s. It is reasonable that Canadians will do initial training with those from whom we purchase the aircraft, which has always been the case.

We will ensure that our men and women in uniform have the best equipment and the best training to do their job safely and effectively.

Ship Recycling
Oral Questions

11:45 a.m.

NDP

Megan Leslie Halifax, NS

Mr. Speaker, Marine Atlantic sold two ferries on the condition that they would be broken down ethically. Instead, these boats wound up in Alang, India, which is one of the most dangerous shipyards in the world. It is known for its environmental and human rights violations. Last year around 27 workers were killed in the shipyard alone.

We are shipping dangerous asbestos overseas, and we are disposing of our waste with no regard for human safety. My question is, how could the government let this happen?

Ship Recycling
Oral Questions

11:45 a.m.

Nepean—Carleton
Ontario

Conservative

Pierre Poilievre Parliamentary Secretary to the Minister of Transport

Mr. Speaker, our government is committed to supporting Marine Atlantic.

We are investing $500 million to help Marine Atlantic renew its fleet and shore facilities. As a crown corporation, Marine Atlantic is arm's-length from the Government of Canada and is responsible for the management of its own operations.

The disposal of the MV Joseph and Clara Smallwood and MV Caribou was an operational decision made by Marine Atlantic.

Ship Recycling
Oral Questions

11:45 a.m.

NDP

Megan Leslie Halifax, NS

Mr. Speaker, why are we sending our ships to be destroyed in such a hazardous environment when we have some of the world's finest shipyards here in Canada?

The government is literally shipping our jobs overseas, and has no regard for human safety and the environment. We know that the Alang shipyard employs children. We know it breaks up the ships on the beach. These ships are probably filled with asbestos.

This is not the kind of Canada we want. Why is the government letting good jobs leave Canada to be completed in one of the world's deadliest shipyards?

Ship Recycling
Oral Questions

11:50 a.m.

Nepean—Carleton
Ontario

Conservative

Pierre Poilievre Parliamentary Secretary to the Minister of Transport

Mr. Speaker, I do not know why the hon. member wants the Government of Canada, politicians, to interfere in the daily operational decisions of Marine Atlantic, which is an arm's-length crown corporation. I do not know if she wants to politicize what should be an arm's-length group.

The disposal of the MV Joseph and Clara Smallwood and the MV Caribou was an operational decision made by Marine Atlantic.

Our government is committed to supporting Marine Atlantic. We are committed to renewing its fleet and its shore facilities. We ask that the NDP finally come around to supporting us in our work on that.

Canadian Wheat Board
Oral Questions

November 4th, 2011 / 11:50 a.m.

Liberal

Wayne Easter Malpeque, PE

Mr. Speaker, my question is for the Minister of Agriculture and Agri-Food.

We know that for years the Parliamentary Secretary to the Minister of Natural Resources has run a campaign of hate against the Canadian Wheat Board, the very board he took a solemn oath to uphold. That is one thing, but why does the minister himself betray the facts, even misinform committee? He stated before committee, “They've”, meaning the board, “always said 'now is not a good time. The directors don't really want to hear from you'.”

I have had three invitations from the board over three years. Why does the minister not tell the facts?

Canadian Wheat Board
Oral Questions

11:50 a.m.

Cypress Hills—Grasslands
Saskatchewan

Conservative

David Anderson Parliamentary Secretary to the Minister of Natural Resources and for the Canadian Wheat Board

Mr. Speaker, I was very disappointed earlier this month. The minister was going to Russia. He had been asked to attend a board meeting. I think the board knew he was going to be away when it sent the invitation. He responded by saying that his parliamentary secretary would be very glad to attend the board meeting. I was very disappointed because the board said it did not want to meet with me.

We have finally come forward with Bill C-18. This legislation would deliver on our government's long-standing commitment to give western Canadian farmers the marketing freedom they so richly deserve.