House of Commons Hansard #68 of the 41st Parliament, 1st Session. (The original version is on Parliament's site.) The word of the day was crime.

Topics

The Economy
Oral Questions

2:30 p.m.

NDP

Peter Julian Burnaby—New Westminster, BC

Mr. Speaker, 90,000 additional unemployed people is not good news.

This year, his department's fiscal reference tables are very clear. For 20 years, the figures have shown that NDP governments are better money managers than Conservative governments. That is because we invest in job creation instead of spending and wasting money on gazebos, presents and tax gifts to our friends.

Instead of sprinkling pixie dust on its friends, will it now invest in Canadian families?

The Economy
Oral Questions

2:30 p.m.

Whitby—Oshawa
Ontario

Conservative

Jim Flaherty Minister of Finance

Mr. Speaker, of course, that is precisely what we have been doing, investing in jobs and the economy, with very good results. The IMF and the OECD predict that Canada will have the strongest economic growth, not only this year but next year. We have job creation, almost 600,000 net new jobs, mostly full-time and mostly in the private sector.

The three large credit rating agencies have looked at Canada in the past few months. All three of them have renewed Canada's AAA credit rating. Canadians can have confidence that we will remain focused on jobs and the economy in the coming year.

Pensions
Oral Questions

2:30 p.m.

NDP

Wayne Marston Hamilton East—Stoney Creek, ON

Mr. Speaker, speaking of results, many Canadians are worried about their retirement. One-third will not even have enough savings to retire and the voluntary options available today are clearly not good enough. This is not the time for another Conservative half-measure. The New Democrat plan to enhance the CPP is reasonable. It offers real retirement security to Canadian workers and their families.

Will the government support our sensible plan to expand the CPP at the first ministers and financial ministers meeting next week?

Pensions
Oral Questions

2:35 p.m.

Macleod
Alberta

Conservative

Ted Menzies Minister of State (Finance)

Mr. Speaker, we actually do have a plan that is supported by all of the provinces. We have met with all of the provinces. They are our partners in pensions. We all understand that. We have consulted with them. We have put forward a plan that is offered by the private sector. It is low cost and is very well received all across this country.

We have actually put out the tax measures involved in this for public consultation. I would encourage hon. members to be part of that consultation. We will be moving forward with a pension plan that many—

Pensions
Oral Questions

2:35 p.m.

Conservative

The Speaker Andrew Scheer

The hon. member for Marc-Aurèle-Fortin.

Pensions
Oral Questions

2:35 p.m.

NDP

Alain Giguère Marc-Aurèle-Fortin, QC

Mr. Speaker, I am forced to contradict the minister. The provinces support our plan, Canadians support our plan, experts support our plan and the Canadian Association of Retired Persons also supports our plan.

This week, they all asked the government to revisit the Canada pension plan at the finance ministers' meeting. The government prefers to gamble with Canadians' money instead of focusing on one secure plan, the Canada pension plan.

Why does this government continue to ignore the demands of Canadians and listen solely to its friends in high finance?

Pensions
Oral Questions

2:35 p.m.

Macleod
Alberta

Conservative

Ted Menzies Minister of State (Finance)

Mr. Speaker, I personally have consulted with a tremendous number of Canadians. I have consulted with every finance minister across this country.

Pensions
Oral Questions

2:35 p.m.

NDP

David Christopherson Hamilton Centre, ON

How about real people?

Pensions
Oral Questions

2:35 p.m.

Conservative

Ted Menzies Macleod, AB

They are real people.

I have consulted with many real people, not only those who are retired but those who are looking at retirement some day, and 60% of Canadians in the workforce that do not have pension plans have asked us if we can provide a pension plan that they can be part of. They can. They can be part of a pooled registered pension plan and they are excited about seeing it come forward.

National Defence
Oral Questions

2:35 p.m.

NDP

Christine Moore Abitibi—Témiscamingue, QC

Mr. Speaker, the Conservatives are going to pay an additional $35 million to Washington for research and development of the F-35s. The Canadian government just hands over the money without asking any questions or demanding any guarantees.

In April, the Prime Minister told us we would not be charged for any costs related to research and development.

With all the concerns raised over the F-35s, why did the Associate Minister of National Defence not take this opportunity to get answers to address these concerns and get some guarantees?

National Defence
Oral Questions

2:35 p.m.

Vaughan
Ontario

Conservative

Julian Fantino Associate Minister of National Defence

Mr. Speaker, the development phase of the F-35 program continues with our partners. The issues that are being talked about of recent date are being addressed as we speak. The U.S. is committed, as are other countries. We remain fixed on our choice. It is a good choice for our men and women, for the future, and for taxpayers in this country.

National Defence
Oral Questions

2:35 p.m.

NDP

Matthew Kellway Beaches—East York, ON

Mr. Speaker, it is simple. When it misleads Canadians, the government must take responsibility.

In April the Prime Minister said, “We are sheltered from research and development costs”. Today we learned that Canadians are on the hook for another $35 million to subsidize Lockheed Martin's R and D. Millions more, delay after delay, and there is no end in sight.

In this season of giving, will the associate minister give us the gift of accountability and acknowledge that he has been misleading the House?

National Defence
Oral Questions

2:35 p.m.

Vaughan
Ontario

Conservative

Julian Fantino Associate Minister of National Defence

Mr. Speaker, I feel a sense of duty to point out to the member opposite that this is the Christmas season, not the silly season.

However, we are working with our allies and continue to work to reduce costs. A joint strike fighter partnership agreement ensures that we are guaranteed to pay the lowest possible price, the same price that the United States is paying. As well, our delivery will not be for years hence, at which point there will be a very fine price for us.

Justice
Oral Questions

2:35 p.m.

NDP

Charmaine Borg Terrebonne—Blainville, QC

Mr. Speaker, when it comes to defence and justice, this government does not know how to count. Their estimates for Bill C-10 are unbelievable. The government claims that the cost of its omnibus crime bill is $80 million over five years, but last March, it was estimated that the young offender provisions alone would cost 10 times more.

Are the Conservatives going to learn how to count before sending the bill to the provinces?

Justice
Oral Questions

2:35 p.m.

Moncton—Riverview—Dieppe
New Brunswick

Conservative

Robert Goguen Parliamentary Secretary to the Minister of Justice

Mr. Speaker, in the summer, our government gave Canadians a gift. We introduced Bill C-10 in order to protect them, and all Canadians will benefit. The cost of crime is roughly $99.6 billion and 83% of that cost is absorbed by the victims. We stand by the victims. The members opposite stand by the accused. Merry Christmas.