House of Commons Hansard #68 of the 41st Parliament, 1st Session. (The original version is on Parliament's site.) The word of the day was crime.

Topics

Canada-U.S. Border
Oral Questions

2:20 p.m.

Ottawa West—Nepean
Ontario

Conservative

John Baird Minister of Foreign Affairs

Mr. Speaker, I do not accept the premise of the question. No decisions in that regard have been made.

What is on the table is our desire, our hope, and our efforts to ensure that the border is not as thick as it has grown in recent years, so that we can have more people and more trade cross the border. That will be tremendously important to the auto worker in Windsor, so we could ensure that they will become the most competitive auto sector in the world.

Why will the member not stand up for auto workers in Windsor and stand up for our agreement with President Obama?

Minister of National Defence
Oral Questions

2:25 p.m.

Liberal

John McKay Scarborough—Guildwood, ON

Mr. Speaker, if the House will indulge me for a moment, I would like to pitch a new MasterCard ad: Joy ride on a search and rescue helicopter: $16,000. Staying in luxury hotels in Europe: $1,400 per night. Endless grief by the Minister of National Defence for the Prime Minister: priceless.

I bet the Minister of National Defence is having his own “shiddle-diddle” moment. How does he explain these abuses of taxpayers' money and when will he reimburse taxpayers?

Minister of National Defence
Oral Questions

2:25 p.m.

Central Nova
Nova Scotia

Conservative

Peter MacKay Minister of National Defence

Mr. Speaker, Canada has certainly earned its seat at the international table when it comes to discussions like we had at the Munich security conference. This conference was held in Germany.

As to the expenses that the member is referring to, Canada books rooms at the same hotel where the conference takes place, where the majority of participants stay. Nation to nation meetings at conferences such as this advance the interests of Canada and advance the interests of the hard-working men and women who serve our country around the world. I was proud to represent Canada at that conference.

Aboriginal Affairs
Oral Questions

2:25 p.m.

Liberal

Carolyn Bennett St. Paul's, ON

Mr. Speaker, I understand the Minister of Aboriginal Affairs met with Chief Spence this afternoon, but he still stubbornly refuses to believe the advice of the Auditor General, his own departmental evaluations, and the Conservatives' previous aboriginal affairs minister. Third party management wreaks havoc across this country.

On Saturday, the leader of the Liberal Party of Canada and I will go to Attawapiskat. Given that the minister still does not get it, will he come and see first-hand what every Canadian is upset about? There is a seat on the plane--

Aboriginal Affairs
Oral Questions

2:25 p.m.

Some hon. members

Oh, oh!

Aboriginal Affairs
Oral Questions

2:25 p.m.

Conservative

The Speaker Andrew Scheer

Order, please. The hon. government House leader.

Aboriginal Affairs
Oral Questions

2:25 p.m.

York—Simcoe
Ontario

Conservative

Peter Van Loan Leader of the Government in the House of Commons

Mr. Speaker, Canadians want to see conditions on first nations reserves improved, and they want to see their tax dollars allocated for that purpose delivering results.

Today's meeting between the minister and the Attawapiskat chief represents a positive step forward. They have agreed together on a range of initiatives, including how best to deliver emergency aid, retrofit winter shelters, and assemble the 22 modular homes for those in precarious housing. These are all steps being taken by the federal government.

We will continue to work in good faith and full transparency, and we look forward to achieving results working together with the chief and council.

Justice
Oral Questions

December 15th, 2011 / 2:25 p.m.

Liberal

Stéphane Dion Saint-Laurent—Cartierville, QC

Mr. Speaker, is there a Minister of Intergovernmental Affairs in this Conservative government? If there is, let him or her rise and tell us why he or she was unable to prevent the government from hiding from the provinces the real cost of Bill C-10 to each of them. The bill is regressive, pointless and flawed, and will not reduce crime, but increase the huge, American-style, overpopulated prisons that are nothing more than expensive schools for crime.

Justice
Oral Questions

2:25 p.m.

Moncton—Riverview—Dieppe
New Brunswick

Conservative

Robert Goguen Parliamentary Secretary to the Minister of Justice

Mr. Speaker, the provinces are well aware of the costs associated with Bill C-10. Nevertheless, the opposition does not seem to understand the importance of the objective of Bill C-10. People who break the law will spend Christmas in jail and the victims will be protected. That has always been our objective and the cost is absolutely justified.

Aboriginal Affairs
Oral Questions

2:25 p.m.

NDP

Charlie Angus Timmins—James Bay, ON

Mr. Speaker, the minister's bumbling and confrontational approach to Attawapiskat just got worse. He had the chance to mend his broken relationship with the community and now they are going to court. His claim that they need a third party Indian agent to deliver homes that were already ordered just does not wash.

Attawapiskat is not looking for handouts. It is not looking for confrontation, and it certainly is not going to pay for a gold-plated warden who is sent there to punish the community for having the nerve to speak up.

Why does the government continue to use the tactics of confrontation against this impoverished community?

Aboriginal Affairs
Oral Questions

2:25 p.m.

York—Simcoe
Ontario

Conservative

Peter Van Loan Leader of the Government in the House of Commons

Mr. Speaker, my read of today's meeting is that it was a positive and constructive event, a good step forward. We look forward to seeing more co-operation.

As I said, our priority is the health and safety of the people of Attawapiskat. Canadians have allocated, through their government, significant tax dollars for things they want to see. They want to see improvements to the conditions there and they want to see results for their tax dollars.

The third party manager is already in place. We see results being delivered, as a result. We see good progress on agreements with the band and the council. We are acting in good faith and full transparency. We hope that the chief and the council will continue to do the same.

Aboriginal Affairs
Oral Questions

2:30 p.m.

NDP

Charlie Angus Timmins—James Bay, ON

Mr. Speaker, Attawapiskat did not just happen. It was years in the making, just as it is happening in first nations reserves across this country. The first thing the government did when it took power was to slash the capital funding for houses on first nations reserves by over half, and it has no intention of restoring funding. That is why the crisis is happening.

The government can punish Attawapiskat. It can fight it in court. However, does it understand that no amount of third party Indian agent is going to silence the call for justice and respect from Canada's first nations?

Aboriginal Affairs
Oral Questions

2:30 p.m.

York—Simcoe
Ontario

Conservative

Peter Van Loan Leader of the Government in the House of Commons

Mr. Speaker, since we became the government, $1.5 billion has been allocated for housing.

As I have said, Canadians want to see conditions on first nations reserves improve. They want to see results delivered for those tax dollars. In fact, on a great many reserves all across this country, we have seen very positive results.

Sadly, as the member observes, in some places that has not happened. That is why we are working harder and stronger forward to improve the problems and the failures of the past. We will continue to work together with willing partners.

I would point members to the joint action plan which the minister has signed with the Assembly of First Nations, laying out a road map on our shared priorities. These all represent positive steps forward.

The Economy
Oral Questions

2:30 p.m.

NDP

Peter Julian Burnaby—New Westminster, BC

Mr. Speaker, yesterday the Minister of Finance said in this House that he is not a magic money fairy. I think the facts disagree.

He has Conservative magic money for untendered and expensive F-35 fighter jets that have tripled in cost since the beginning and will now cost about $20 billion.

He has billions of dollars of Conservative pixie dust to sprinkle on unbudgeted prisons.

He has Conservative magic money for massive corporate tax cuts to banks and big oil.

He has magic money for his friends.

The question is, will he stop sprinkling magic money on his friends and start investing in Canadian families?

The Economy
Oral Questions

2:30 p.m.

Whitby—Oshawa
Ontario

Conservative

Jim Flaherty Minister of Finance

Mr. Speaker, I do not know why the hon. member casts aspersions on fairies.

Despite this casting of aspersions on fairies, I do wish the hon. member merry Christmas from all elves and trolls, wherever we are.

We are fortunate that Canada's economy is doing relatively well in what is a challenging world. Canadians can remain assured that we will focus on jobs and the economy.