House of Commons Hansard #68 of the 41st Parliament, 1st Session. (The original version is on Parliament's site.) The word of the day was person.

Topics

Federal Government
Oral Questions

3:05 p.m.

Bloc

André Bellavance Richmond—Arthabaska, QC

Mr. Speaker, the list of federal decisions that go against the interests of Quebec is so long that I did not have time to finish it yesterday. I will continue today: $8 billion in cuts annually, including $60 million at Human Resources and $7 million at Economic Development for which we do not have any details; astronomical spending on war planes; the creation of a Canada-wide securities commission; the inclusion of supply management in international trade agreements; the reduction in rural postal services. I could go on, but the session is wrapping up.

If the government thinks this was a good fall for Quebec, as the Minister of Veterans Affairs claims, then I would hate to see a bad fall.

Federal Government
Oral Questions

3:05 p.m.

Mégantic—L'Érable
Québec

Conservative

Christian Paradis Minister of Industry and Minister of State (Agriculture)

Mr. Speaker, nothing could be further from the truth. We have a record of accomplishments on major files. We made promises and we kept our word. We settled the sales tax harmonization and announced a plan for rebuilding the Champlain Bridge. Just before the election, we concluded the Old Harry offshore oil and natural gas deposit agreement. These are decisions that had been dragging on for decades, and things certainly would not have moved forward with the Bloc Québécois. That is why they are at the back of the House.

Business of the House
Oral Questions

3:05 p.m.

NDP

Chris Charlton Hamilton Mountain, ON

Mr. Speaker, I am very pleased to say that I know exactly what the parliamentary schedule is for the remainder of this week and for the next few as well. I am pleased that we will all be able to get back to our ridings to work on behalf of our constituents, to celebrate Christmas and the holidays with our family and friends and to reflect on the work we do here on behalf of all Canadians, particularly those who are having a hard time making ends meet this holiday season.

Today I would like to extend wishes for a merry Christmas and happy holidays and to offer a very big thanks to everyone in and around the House of Commons.

Of course, that includes my colleagues on all sides of the House and all of our staff, who make us look good most of the time.

Canadians watching at home might not realize it, but there is a huge network of talented and professional staff who work tirelessly to make this place run like clockwork.

First is you, Mr. Speaker, and your staff, along with the unbelievably helpful procedural experts in the clerks' offices, the table, the journals branch, the committee directorate staff, the Library of Parliament staff and, of course, all of the incredible pages.

There is the Sergeant-at-Arms and everyone from security, as well as traffic operations, the drivers of our green buses, dispatch operators, mail room staff and messengers.

There is the cafeteria staff and all the food services and catering team.

There is the maintenance staff, the tradespeople in the Parliamentary precinct, materiel management and room allocation.

There is everyone in information services, including telecom, ISSI, printing services and the broadcasting team.

There are the people who deal with HR, finance, travel and pay and benefits.

There are the folks who document all our words at Hansard and those who translate and interpret them from one official language to the other.

Finally, I would like to pay special tribute to three valuable members of the team in the Parliamentary Precinct who will not be returning with us in January when the House resumes sitting: Law Clerk and Parliamentary Counsel Rob Walsh, Parliamentary Librarian Bill Young and Danielle Lemieux-Lessard in the private members' business and petitions office.

I thank you, Mr. Speaker, and everyone who works so hard in this place. I wish a merry Christmas and happy holidays to all, including the government House leader.

Business of the House
Oral Questions

3:05 p.m.

Some hon. members

Hear, hear!

Business of the House
Oral Questions

December 15th, 2011 / 3:10 p.m.

York—Simcoe
Ontario

Conservative

Peter Van Loan Leader of the Government in the House of Commons

Mr. Speaker, thank you for the opportunity to give my last Thursday statement of 2011. The fall has been a productive, hard-working and orderly session. It has been capped by results that we have seen in the House during delivering results month since we returned from the Remembrance Day constituency week.

Of particular note, this fall the House passed Bill C-13, the keeping Canada's economy and jobs growing act; Bill C-20, the fair representation act; Bill C-18, the marketing freedom for grain farmers act; and Bill C-10, the safe streets and communities act.

Other things were also accomplished, from the appointment of two officers of Parliament to the passing at second reading of Bill C-26, the Citizen's Arrest and Self-defence Act. I would like to thank the opposition parties who made these accomplishments possible. Nevertheless, the House has a lot of work to do when it returns in 2012.

The things I am looking forward to in 2012 include, after 48 speeches so far, returning to Bill C-19, the ending the long-gun registry act; after 75 speeches so far, continuing debate on second reading of Bill C-11, the copyright modernization act; after 73 speeches so far, continuing debating the opposition motion to block Bill C-4, the preventing human smugglers from abusing Canada's immigration system act from proceeding to committee; and, after 47 speeches so far, continuing debate on second reading of Bill C-7, the Senate reform act.

This winter, the government's priority will continue to be economic growth and job creation. We will thus continue to move forward with our economic agenda by debating legislative measures such as Bill C-23 on the implementation of a Canada-Jordan free trade agreement; Bill C-24 on the implementation of a Canada-Panama free trade agreement; Bill C-25, which is designed to give Canadians another way to plan for retirement through pooled registered pension plans; and Bill C-28 on the appointment of a financial literacy leader.

Needless to say, I am looking forward to the 2012 budget, the next phase of Canada's economic recovery, from the Minister of Finance, and I am looking forward to what I am sure it will deliver for the Canadian economy. This will be the cornerstone of the upcoming session.

With respect to the precise business of the House for the week of January 30, 2012, I will advise my counterparts in the usual fashion in advance of the House returning.

In closing, Mr. Speaker, please let me wish you, my fellow house leaders, all hon. members and our table officers and support staff a very merry Christmas.

In particular, I want to thank the pages, many of whom, as we know, spent their first significant amount of time away from home with us this fall. I wish them a pleasant time back home with family over Christmas. Perhaps we have provided some good stories for them to tell around the dinner table.

Merry Christmas, happy new year and all the best for the break. Here is to a productive, orderly and hard-working 2012.

Merry Christmas and happy new year. May the members of the House rest up in preparation for the hard work to come in a productive and orderly 2012.

Question Period
Points of Order
Oral Questions

3:10 p.m.

Liberal

Mauril Bélanger Ottawa—Vanier, ON

Mr. Speaker, I wish to correct the impression given by the Minister of Citizenship, Immigration and Multiculturalism that I was asking for personal information. I was not. I was asking if he would look at the case, use his discretion and ensure cohesion in the implementation of a program.

He knows full well that I gave him the information I referred to. I gave him a copy of the front page edition of the Ottawa Citizen for December 8.

Question Period
Points of Order
Oral Questions

3:10 p.m.

Conservative

The Speaker Andrew Scheer

I have not heard anything that is a point of order. It sounds like a continuation of debate. I know it will be difficult to wait until January 30, but I am sure the member could continue the debate at that point or he could speak with the minister, who is still in the chamber, if he wants to pursue a particular file.

The House resumed consideration of the motion that Bill C-26, An Act to amend the Criminal Code (citizen's arrest and the defences of property and persons), be read the second time and referred to a committee.

Citizen's Arrest and Self-defence Act
Government Orders

3:10 p.m.

Conservative

The Speaker Andrew Scheer

Pursuant to an order made earlier today, the motion for second reading of Bill C-26, An Act to amend the Criminal Code (citizen's arrest and the defences of property and persons), is deemed adopted on division.

Accordingly, this bill is referred to the Standing Committee on Justice and Human Rights.

(Motion agreed to, bill read the second time and referred to a committee)

Citizen's Arrest and Self-defence Act
Government Orders

3:10 p.m.

Conservative

The Speaker Andrew Scheer

It being 3:15 p.m., pursuant to an order made earlier today, the House stands adjourned until Monday, January 30, 2012, at 11 a.m. pursuant to Standing Orders 28(2) and 24(1).

Merry Christmas everyone.

(The House adjourned at 3:15 p.m.)