House of Commons Hansard #59 of the 41st Parliament, 1st Session. (The original version is on Parliament's site.) The word of the day was amendments.

Topics

Safe Streets and Communities Act
Government Orders

10:50 a.m.

Liberal

Kevin Lamoureux Winnipeg North, MB

Mr. Speaker, under the category of hard to believe but true, I want members to imagine this.

The member for Mount Royal proposed amendments to the justice for victims of terrorism act. Using their majority, the Conservatives decided not to support the amendments. After the bill went through committee and into report stage, the government used the very same amendments but labelled them Conservative amendments. They messed up, of course, because they could not bring the amendments forward at report stage. They have admitted that the bill itself has flaws. Because of their incompetence and inability to recognize the positive contributions from the Liberal Party through the member for Mount Royal, those amendments were not added to the bill.

Does that make any sense to the member?

Safe Streets and Communities Act
Government Orders

10:50 a.m.

NDP

Françoise Boivin Gatineau, QC

Of course the short answer would be no, Mr. Speaker, but my answers are rarely short.

It goes without saying that this does not make any sense, and I said it earlier. In my opinion, it is going to be important to see if the Senate does the job that it should do when it deals with Bill C-10, particularly since the Minister of Public Safety himself now recognizes what we all knew, namely that there is a problem, including with certain clauses on terrorism. We think there are problems with many other clauses in this bill.

The government even claims to have listened to Quebec with the three amendments proposed by Quebec's Minister of Justice. The government accepted a cosmetic change whereby the word “promote” is replaced with “improve”. This is totally ridiculous, because the notion of long-term protection of the public, which was the basic objective for Quebeckers, was excluded. It will probably resurface some day.

Now, the Minister of Public Safety is trying to amend Bill C-10 through the back door. He did not want to do it directly in front of opposition members, because he did not want to admit that his bill is flawed. Now, we are going to see if the Senate can be useful. However, as I said earlier, I doubt it. It will send us back the legislation without any changes, because the government is intent on passing it within the first 100 days of this Parliament.

Safe Streets and Communities Act
Government Orders

10:50 a.m.

NDP

Manon Perreault Montcalm, QC

Mr. Speaker, I would like to congratulate my colleague on all the good, sound arguments she made regarding this bill.

I wonder if she could tell us why such an important bill is not being given the time needed—an acceptable amount of time—in order to debate it more thoroughly.

Safe Streets and Communities Act
Government Orders

10:50 a.m.

NDP

Françoise Boivin Gatineau, QC

Mr. Speaker, that is an excellent question. That is definitely the question we will be asking all day, since it is such a huge bill, with 208 clauses.

The only conclusion I can draw is that the Conservative government is afraid of debating its ideas. Why? Because its argument is very weak and is not supported by any studies. The Minister of Justice told us himself that these are his own personal observations, because there is very little left of any studies. The government spoke at length about the study conducted by Justice Nunn, who appeared himself and contradicted the Conservatives, saying that he agreed with only part of the bill. That is the problem. Everyone agrees with small sections of the bill. However, if I say I agree with one small section, they must not quote me and say that the member for Gatineau supports Bill C-10.

That is the problem. They are truly afraid of having a real debate. Yet they have a majority. They have no reason to fear that Bill C-10 will not pass. If they were serious legislators, they would have taken the time needed. We have heard this from the Quebec justice minister, the Quebec bar and the Canadian Bar Association. Incidentally, those two associations are not made up of only criminal defence attorneys, as we have heard said in this House. They include lawyers who specialize in all areas of the law. Only a small percentage practice criminal law.

I must say, the Conservatives are laying it on a little thick when they say that if we do not support them, then we must support the criminals. No one here is siding with the criminals.

Safe Streets and Communities Act
Government Orders

10:55 a.m.

NDP

Marc-André Morin Laurentides—Labelle, QC

Mr. Speaker, I would like to hear what my colleague from Gatineau has to say about one point.

What impressed me in the six-inch-thick document is the number of things it forgets about. It forgets about people like prison guards. I have met some of them. If an inmate spits in their face, they have to fill out a report and get treatment for six months in case they have contracted AIDS or hepatitis B. The inmate who committed the offence is transferred to another section, which is what they wanted. This is used as a weapon for extortion.

I wonder how many things like this have been forgotten about. But this bill should protect honest people, peace officers and prison guards. Not only is it full of errors, but it is also full of omissions. This is a bill I would rather see put into the shredder than into the presses of the Canada Gazette.

Safe Streets and Communities Act
Government Orders

10:55 a.m.

NDP

Françoise Boivin Gatineau, QC

Mr. Speaker, I mentioned that in my speech. These are people we should have talked to. A lot of work has been done outside working hours, because there was not a lot of time to examine this bill in committee and at first reading. Nonetheless, we were contacted by a number of people who wanted to be heard on Bill C-10. It is unfortunate that we could not hear them. Prison guards, for example, have major concerns about Bill C-10 and their working conditions in detention centres. The ministers of justice from various provinces may agree with some aspects of the bill, but they do not agree with the costs involved in building prisons.

These prisons have not been built yet, but we know the speed with which these things get built in Canada, except in the riding of the President of the Treasury Board. In the rest of the country, construction is rather slow. That means that the prison guards we now have will be the ones having to deal with overpopulation problems, not to mention prisons for women, where there are even greater problems. There are major concerns. About 100 omissions like these have been identified, because nearly 100 amendments were proposed and were automatically rejected.

Safe Streets and Communities Act
Government Orders

10:55 a.m.

Conservative

The Speaker Andrew Scheer

I must interrupt the hon. member because it is now time for statements by members.

Mayor of Quesnel
Statements By Members

10:55 a.m.

Conservative

Dick Harris Cariboo—Prince George, BC

Mr. Speaker, today I want to pay tribute to a wonderful lady in my riding of Cariboo—Prince George. Mary Sjostrom is the newly elected mayor of the great city of Quesnel, B.C.

Mary has been an amazing supporter of her hometown, having been active in business, community organizations, civic politics and just about everything else we can think of to make Quesnel, B.C. a city with an awesome community spirit and a great place to live. It has been my pleasure to know Mayor Mary for many years and to work with her over the last few years. She carries out her civic leadership roles with class, determination and a complete dedication to the people of Quesnel.

I congratulate Mary and look forward once again to working with her as she continues in her leadership role as mayor. I thank Mary for her friendship.

Quebec City Public Transit
Statements By Members

11 a.m.

NDP

Annick Papillon Québec, QC

Mr. Speaker, in November, the City of Quebec released the final report of the working group on sustainable mobility. Extensive consultation was done on this plan, which is an initiative to make public transit more efficient in the context of a long-term vision of sustainable development for generations to come.

Quebec City is proving that it is sensitive to the needs of families and people with lower incomes who, as the cost of gasoline rises, will be able to benefit from a more efficient and accessible public transit system.

I commend Quebec City's spirit of innovation and leadership in this plan for sustainable mobility. This initiative goes hand in hand with the NDP proposal that Canada create a national transit strategy.

I want to take this opportunity to assure my constituents and Mayor Régis Labeaume that they have my support for this forward-looking project. I wholeheartedly invite the Conservative government to support our municipalities and take part in this project.

Violence against Women
Statements By Members

December 2nd, 2011 / 11 a.m.

Conservative

Joy Smith Kildonan—St. Paul, MB

Mr. Speaker, today is the International Day for the Abolition of Slavery, which represents the global effort to eradicate contemporary forms of slavery, such as trafficking in persons, sexual exploitation, the worst forms of child labour, forced marriage and child soldiers. Tragically, women and girls make up the majority of these victims, even here in Canada.

The Government of Canada is deeply committed to addressing the problem of violence against women and girls in Canada and abroad. Our government will mark December 6, the National Day of Remembrance and Action on Violence Against Women, by encouraging all Canadians to raise awareness about gender violence and taking action to invest in projects that combat violence and abuse against women.

May we all remain steadfast in our determination and action to end violence against women and girls in all of its forms.

Human Rights
Statements By Members

11 a.m.

Liberal

Irwin Cotler Mount Royal, QC

Mr. Speaker, this week I participated as a Canadian member of the parliamentary delegation in the annual parliamentary hearing at the United Nations.

In the session on political accountability, including that of the United Nations itself, I called upon the UN Security Council to invoke its responsibility to protect doctrine to protect against murder, brutality and torture, including the torture of children and hospital patients, forced disappearances and the like in Syria. I called on it to heed the calls of the Arab League for the protection of Syrian civilians, which the Syrian government responded to with more murder and which has since been sanctioned by the Arab League.

In the second session on youth participation, particularly in the Arab Spring, I called upon the United Nations to help secure the immediate release of a young Egyptian blogger, Maikel Nabil, one of the early voices of the Egyptian Arab Spring, who then became the first political prisoner in the post-Mubarak era. Today as we meet, he languishes in prison on the 102nd day of a hunger strike for seeking to do that which the Arab Spring was hoping for. He has emerged as a symbol of the hope yet betrayal of the Arab Spring.

Shipbuilding Industry
Statements By Members

11 a.m.

Conservative

Andrew Saxton North Vancouver, BC

Mr. Speaker, I rise today to acknowledge the immense contribution that our government recently made to the future of my city, my province and our country.

After a fair, transparent and competitive process, the shipbuilding secretariat announced an $8 billion contract to North Vancouver's Seaspan Marine Corporation. This announcement was met with jubilation across British Columbia. I applaud our government for its success in implementing a fair and transparent arm's length process.

As we have heard, this decision has been great news for Canadians, for British Columbians and for Vancouverites. By some estimates, our national shipbuilding procurement strategy will create 15,000 good jobs over the next 30 years, revitalizing our Canadian shipbuilding industry.

While the parties in opposition have no plan for growing our economy and creating jobs, our government supports job growth. We are delivering on our promise to create good jobs in high tech industries across Canada and provide much needed ships for the Canadian navy and Coast Guard.

I join the people of North Vancouver in congratulating Vancouver's Seaspan Marine Corporation on its successful bid.

Entrepreneurial Excellence in the Outaouais
Statements By Members

11 a.m.

NDP

Françoise Boivin Gatineau, QC

Mr. Speaker, I have the great pleasure of recognizing entrepreneurial excellence in the Outaouais, particularly in my riding of Gatineau. On November 24, at the Canadian Tourism Awards gala, the Buffet des Continents was awarded this year's Community Service Award for its outstanding contribution to the community.

At the Gatineau Chamber of Commerce gala held on November 26, the following businesses and individuals were recognized for their excellence, innovation and vision: Sporthèque de Hull; PXL MEDIA; Storeimage; Rochef Chocolatier; Patry, Poulin, Trahan & Associés Inc.; Pedayoga; Impression Charles; the Laiterie de l'Outaouais revitalization committee; Eugène Tassé—the most valuable entrepreneur; and Jean Vaillancourt, Rector of the Université du Québec en Outaouais. The Buffet des Continents was honoured once again. Jean-Claude DesRosiers was honoured as person of the year.

Speaking for myself and for the NDP caucus, I wish the dynamic entrepreneurs of Gatineau and the Outaouais much success and prosperity. The New Democratic Party is a proud partner of our business community and will continue to support its development.

Natural Resources
Statements By Members

11:05 a.m.

Conservative

Brian Jean Fort McMurray—Athabasca, AB

Mr. Speaker, the Keystone pipeline will create tens of thousands of jobs and tens of billions of dollars in economic growth in the United States and in Canada.

This project is the largest shovel-ready project in the United States. It is state of the art and environmentally sound. It is time to deliver Canadian oil to other markets around the world. The northern gateway pipeline to the west coast, is a stable, secure and ethical pipeline to deliver energy to the world from the most socially progressive and environmentally sound oil producers in the world.

I thank and salute Suncor, Syncrude, Albian Sands, Nexen, and Canadian Natural Resources Limited.

We are a trading nation in a global economy. We need to seize these opportunities to create more jobs and a better quality of life for all Canadians.

Violence against Women
Statements By Members

11:05 a.m.

Conservative

Ted Opitz Etobicoke Centre, ON

Mr. Speaker, Canada and the world are marking the 16 days of activism against gender violence.

We know that women and girls are more likely than men to experience violence and assault in intimate and family relationships. Over 80% of sexual assault victims are women or girls. Dating violence is a growing problem.

Education and awareness are critical tools. Women and girls should always be aware of their surroundings and be prepared to call for help from families, friends or other support options in the community. They should know about their personal rights and their personal boundaries. This campaign is also an important time to remind men and boys of their role in the solution.

During these 16 days of activism, we can each do our part in preventing violence against women and girls in all its forms.