House of Commons Hansard #126 of the 40th Parliament, 3rd Session. (The original version is on Parliament's site.) The word of the day was liberals.

Topics

International Co-operation
Oral Questions

2:50 p.m.

Liberal

Maria Minna Beaches—East York, ON

Mr. Speaker, the Canadian Teachers' Federation Project Overseas is now in its 50th year. It has sent nearly 2,000 teachers to over 50 countries to train teachers, develop curriculums and teach children.

Canada has made a commitment to help these countries meet their millennium development goals, but the Conservative government is abandoning its responsibility to these children.

How can the Conservatives spend $2 million on a fake lake, while they cut $2 million to help kids learn in developing countries?

International Co-operation
Oral Questions

2:50 p.m.

Newmarket—Aurora
Ontario

Conservative

Lois Brown Parliamentary Secretary to the Minister of International Cooperation

Mr. Speaker, as I said yesterday and last Friday, this decision was made at the program level in the agency. We understand that agency officials expressed concern with CTF regarding a lack of focus, a lack of sustainability and a lack of budgetary information.

CTF is more than welcome to address these issues and to apply for funding under the new call for proposals.

International Co-operation
Oral Questions

2:50 p.m.

Liberal

Maria Minna Beaches—East York, ON

Mr. Speaker, it is unacceptable.

In Kenya, Canadian teachers have trained 3,600 teachers who in turn are now teaching 350,000 kids. The local programs also educate both teachers and students about HIV and AIDS in Kenya.

Teachers in Sierra Leone have said that without our good Canadian teachers the country will fail to meet its development goals.

These volunteer teachers help save lives, empower women and reduce poverty.

Once more, how can the Conservatives find $2 million for PMO press clippings, but find nothing for dedicated teachers abroad?

International Co-operation
Oral Questions

2:50 p.m.

Newmarket—Aurora
Ontario

Conservative

Lois Brown Parliamentary Secretary to the Minister of International Cooperation

Mr. Speaker, our government is bringing real accountability to development funding to ensure that taxpayer dollars bring real results.

Canadian International Development Agency staff have been working with the Canadian Teachers' Federation for the last six months to help it adapt its program to the funding criteria. CTF knows full well why the agency refused its proposal.

Natural Resources
Oral Questions

2:50 p.m.

NDP

Nathan Cullen Skeena—Bulkley Valley, BC

Mr. Speaker, after a completely inadequate review process, the Canadian Nuclear Safety Commission gave the green light to ship more than 1,600 tonnes of radioactive waste through the Great Lakes and St. Lawrence Seaway. Only a few hours of hearings were held to rush through a scheme that would impact the drinking water of more than 40 million people.

People in places like Owen Sound, Windsor, Sarnia, Toronto, Montreal and Trois Rivières are hardly fearmongering. They are deeply concerned for their own safety and the safety of their families.

The minister must step in now and stop this dangerous nuclear shipment. Will he finally listen to the concerns of Canadians and stop this radioactive flotilla?

Natural Resources
Oral Questions

2:55 p.m.

Mégantic—L'Érable
Québec

Conservative

Christian Paradis Minister of Natural Resources

Mr. Speaker, this is fearmongering of the worst sort.

Paragraph 48 of the decision clearly notes that surface radiation from one steam generator is no more than one would find in a package of medical isotopes, the same packages that are delivered in each hospital every day in the country.

I do not know why the member is once again trying to undermine the credibility of a quasi-judicial organization, which is arm's-length from the government.

Fisheries and Oceans
Oral Questions

February 8th, 2011 / 2:55 p.m.

NDP

Fin Donnelly New Westminster—Coquitlam, BC

Mr. Speaker, the federal court ruled that the government must protect orca whales and their critical habitat on the Pacific coast.

Because these majestic whales are in danger, they are protected under the Species at Risk Act. Now we learn the Minister of Fisheries and Oceans plans to appeal this decision, arguing DFO has no duty to protect Canada's orcas.

Why is the minister wasting time and money on an appeal rather than doing her duty and protecting this important icon in British Columbia?

Fisheries and Oceans
Oral Questions

2:55 p.m.

Egmont
P.E.I.

Conservative

Gail Shea Minister of Fisheries and Oceans

Mr. Speaker, it is also our duty to speak for the fishing industry. To appeal this decision is in the best interest of Canadians and the fishing industry.

Foreign Affairs
Oral Questions

2:55 p.m.

Conservative

Scott Reid Lanark—Frontenac—Lennox and Addington, ON

Mr. Speaker, John Diefenbaker was a champion of human rights throughout his public life, culminating in the adoption of the Bill of the Rights in 1960, something he regarded as the caps on his career.

Today Canadians learned that the Government of Canada has created a prestigious new human rights award named after John George Diefenbaker. Could the Minister of Foreign Affairs inform the House about this award?

Foreign Affairs
Oral Questions

2:55 p.m.

Pontiac
Québec

Conservative

Lawrence Cannon Minister of Foreign Affairs

Mr. Speaker, the Diefenbaker award will honour individuals and groups showing exceptional courage and leadership in defending human rights and freedoms. This annual award also reflects our government's strong support for human rights and the efforts of individuals and organizations to promote freedom and democracy worldwide, often under very difficult circumstances.

Our government will continue to be a relentless advocate of human rights around the world.

Census
Oral Questions

2:55 p.m.

Liberal

Carolyn Bennett St. Paul's, ON

Mr. Speaker, the Conservative head count in our far north is already under way without the long form census.

As Elisapee Sheutiapik, the mayor of Iqaluit, told the industry committee this summer:

—to keep Canada strong, we need to know how the country is changing, where people live, work, and raise their families. This census helps us do that.

Poverty, hidden homelessness and education are serious challenges for people of the north. How does the government plan to address them with only a head count survey?

Census
Oral Questions

2:55 p.m.

Parry Sound—Muskoka
Ontario

Conservative

Tony Clement Minister of Industry

Mr. Speaker, I thank the hon. member for giving me an opportunity to report on the success so far of the initial stages of the census and the national household survey.

She is right. We have already started to roll out, in advance of the May national census, the short form in northern Canada, as well the national household survey. She would be pleased to know that so far all of these are an absolute success.

Culture
Oral Questions

2:55 p.m.

Bloc

Carole Lavallée Saint-Bruno—Saint-Hubert, QC

Mr. Speaker, the end of the assistance program for literary and artistic magazines with low circulation will have a dramatic effect on French-language periodicals. Forty-four specialized periodicals are being threatened as a result of yet another ridiculous decision by the Department of Canadian Heritage. After targeting the performing arts by eliminating assistance for tours and after introducing a bill that robs creators of their income, the Conservatives are now attacking literary publications for no reason.

When will the Conservatives stop picking on the cultural sector?

Culture
Oral Questions

2:55 p.m.

Port Moody—Westwood—Port Coquitlam
B.C.

Conservative

James Moore Minister of Canadian Heritage and Official Languages

Mr. Speaker, these changes to government policy were announced a year and a half ago and the Bloc Québécois is just now opening its eyes and seeing what was done. We established our policy in this regard after consulting with cultural organizations. In addition, more Quebec periodicals than ever will receive federal government subsidies as a result of these changes. We are increasing funding; we are not making any cuts. We are protecting culture throughout Canada, including in Quebec.

Agriculture
Oral Questions

3 p.m.

NDP

Alex Atamanenko British Columbia Southern Interior, BC

Mr. Speaker, I received over 12,700 letters of support for my private member's bill, Bill C-474. This bill would protect farmers from economic harm that could arise from GE crops of which our export markets want no part.

B.C. fruit growers in the Okanagan and Similkameen Valley are saying that they are dead against the release of a genetically modified non-browning apple. They are worried about cross-pollination, which could kill the organic apple industry.

Why is the government continuing to take farmers for granted and refusing to protect them against the release of genetically modified crops, like alfalfa, wheat and apples?