House of Commons Hansard #139 of the 40th Parliament, 3rd Session. (The original version is on Parliament's site.) The word of the day was person.

Topics

Citizenship and Immigration
Oral Questions

11:40 a.m.

Liberal

Marlene Jennings Notre-Dame-de-Grâce—Lachine, QC

Mr. Speaker, the Conservative funding plan for new Canadians reeks of contempt. They are categorizing entire ridings as being very ethnic. What does “very ethnic” mean? They are categorizing Canadians and are targeting Asian, Jewish and Ukrainian people.

Do the Conservatives think that some Canadians are more Canadian than others? Are they unable to understand that all Canadians are real Canadians?

Citizenship and Immigration
Oral Questions

11:40 a.m.

Ottawa West—Nepean
Ontario

Conservative

John Baird Leader of the Government in the House of Commons

Mr. Speaker, the minister of immigration has worked so hard to make every single Canadian, young and old, new and those who have been here for generations, those from the west and the east, and those who have come to make Canada their home, welcome in this country.

He has done a significant amount to reach out to these citizens. He has cut the landing fee for them, something that was imposed by the Liberal government. He has cut that in half. He has brought in a record number of new Canadians to call Canada home, to help build Canada and make it a place for optimism, for hope and for opportunity. We make no apologies for that.

Agriculture and Agri-Food
Oral Questions

11:40 a.m.

Conservative

Maurice Vellacott Saskatoon—Wanuskewin, SK

Mr. Speaker, our government is committed to strengthening Canada's economy. Last week Statistics Canada released the 2009 “Bioproducts Production and Development Survey”. The survey confirms that the investments our government has made have sparked the industry, with 43% of those firms reporting having become involved in bioproducts production or development since our government took office. That is an outstanding growth rate.

Could the Minister of Agriculture tell the House how biofuels are benefiting Canadian farmers while boosting the Canadian economy?

Agriculture and Agri-Food
Oral Questions

11:45 a.m.

Glengarry—Prescott—Russell
Ontario

Conservative

Pierre Lemieux Parliamentary Secretary to the Minister of Agriculture

Mr. Speaker, that is a tough but fair question.

The member for Saskatoon—Wanuskewin is absolutely right. Advancing Canada's bio-based economy while providing opportunities for our farmers is indeed a priority for this government. We have taken action by passing the renewable fuels bill in 2008. We have also developed a comprehensive renewable fuel strategy and invested over $2 billion in support of the renewable fuel industry. It is a strategy that is winning praise from leaders such as Don Kenny, chair of the Grain Farmers of Ontario, who said last month:

Thank you to the Canadian government for the implementation of a renewable fuels strategy that will truly benefit our farmers—

Regional Development
Oral Questions

11:45 a.m.

NDP

Jack Harris St. John's East, NL

Mr. Speaker, Atlantic Canadians are still struggling to recover from the recession, but this government continues to chip away at the Atlantic Canada Opportunities Agency. The 17% cut to ACOA's budget while the unemployment rate is above the national average is a stark reminder of the Prime Minister's opinion of Atlantic Canadians. Included in the cuts is a $2.5 million drop in the promotion of official languages and $24 million from RInC funding.

When will this government accept that the people of Atlantic Canada are not locked in a culture of defeat and give them the support they need to prosper?

Regional Development
Oral Questions

11:45 a.m.

Fredericton
New Brunswick

Conservative

Keith Ashfield Minister of National Revenue

Mr. Speaker, our government's economic stimulus measures rolled out through ACOA were wildly successful. I might remind the member opposite that there were significant investments in his own riding.

We have been clear all along that these temporary stimulus measures will be ending. That is why we call them “temporary”. I recommend a wonderful resource to the member opposite. He could use the Webster's dictionary to look up the word “temporary”.

Government Priorities
Oral Questions

11:45 a.m.

NDP

Charlie Angus Timmins—James Bay, ON

Mr. Speaker, when I go into Iroquois Falls, Cochrane and Englehart and Timmins, I am hearing the same story over and over. Families are unable to find long-term care facilities to look after their loved ones. They look to this government and see a profligate spending spree to build prisons. No wonder Canadians are saying Ottawa is broken.

Is the government too busy playing political games to notice or care that Canadians are struggling? Where is the plan for long-term care? Why has the government abandoned seniors who should be able to spend their last years living in dignity and comfort?

Government Priorities
Oral Questions

11:45 a.m.

Oxford
Ontario

Conservative

Dave MacKenzie Parliamentary Secretary to the Minister of Public Safety

Mr. Speaker, I am sure when that member goes to those communities they ask why he broke the faith and voted against Bill C-391. That is the real question in his riding.

Former Public Sector Integrity Commissioner
Oral Questions

11:45 a.m.

Bloc

Richard Nadeau Gatineau, QC

Mr. Speaker, we have learned that Christiane Ouimet, the former public sector integrity commissioner, received $400,000 in severance pay after she was forced to resign. In a damning report, the Auditor General pointed out the many shortcomings in Ms. Ouimet's performance. It is outrageous to compensate an individual who has done a poor job and persecuted her employees.

Will the Conservatives make public the contract and the agreement reached with Ms. Ouimet, or are we to understand that she was given preferential treatment?

Former Public Sector Integrity Commissioner
Oral Questions

11:45 a.m.

North Vancouver
B.C.

Conservative

Andrew Saxton Parliamentary Secretary to the President of the Treasury Board

Mr. Speaker, the previous Public Sector Integrity Commissioner has resigned. We look forward to working with all opposition parties to find a new commissioner.

The government sought and followed legal advice as to the terms of her resignation, based on her years of service.

We understand that Ms. Ouimet will be appearing before the standing committee next week, which is the appropriate place to raise these questions.

Former Public Sector Integrity Commissioner
Oral Questions

11:45 a.m.

Bloc

Richard Nadeau Gatineau, QC

Mr. Speaker, the reality is that the former commissioner did not resign. She was fired and promised a golden parachute. This royal treatment is rather uncommon, especially since public servants will no longer be entitled to severance pay.

How do the Conservatives explain the special treatment given to Ms. Ouimet, when they quite simply should have fired her, with no severance, because of her incompetence and tyranny?

Former Public Sector Integrity Commissioner
Oral Questions

11:45 a.m.

North Vancouver
B.C.

Conservative

Andrew Saxton Parliamentary Secretary to the President of the Treasury Board

Mr. Speaker, as I mentioned, the government sought and followed legal advice as to the terms of her resignation, based on her years of service.

The hon. member is on the committee that will hear from Ms. Ouimet next week. I recommend that he ask her those questions in front of the committee.

International Co-operation
Oral Questions

11:45 a.m.

Liberal

Anthony Rota Nipissing—Timiskaming, ON

Mr. Speaker, the CIDA minister's refusal to answer basic questions about her contempt for this place goes beyond just the cuts to KAIROS. It strikes at the heart of what the Prime Minister once claimed to promote. In an edict to ministers, he said that they must:

—answer honestly and accurately about their areas of responsibility.

So, who told the minister to cut KAIROS funding and why has she continued to mislead this House over these past months?

International Co-operation
Oral Questions

11:50 a.m.

Ottawa West—Nepean
Ontario

Conservative

John Baird Leader of the Government in the House of Commons

Mr. Speaker, on December 9, the minister appeared before a committee, and I believe she answered about 11 times the question of why she made the decision not to renew funding for KAIROS. It was on December 9, before the foreign affairs and international development committee.

International Co-operation
Oral Questions

March 4th, 2011 / 11:50 a.m.

Liberal

Anthony Rota Nipissing—Timiskaming, ON

Mr. Speaker, either the Prime Minister can be taken at his word or he is just paying lip service. He has publicly instructed his ministers to give truthful and precise answers to the questions they are asked. Let us try again.

Who told the minister to cut the funding and who inserted the word “not” in the falsified documents? Is that so hard?