House of Commons Hansard #70 of the 41st Parliament, 1st Session. (The original version is on Parliament's site.) The word of the day was pension.

Topics

The Environment
Oral Questions

January 31st, 2012 / 2:25 p.m.

NDP

Megan Leslie Halifax, NS

Mr. Speaker, if the Minister of Natural Resources were not pretending to still be living in the 19th century—

The Environment
Oral Questions

2:25 p.m.

Some hon. members

Oh,oh!

The Environment
Oral Questions

2:25 p.m.

Conservative

The Speaker Andrew Scheer

Order, please. The hon. member for Halifax has the floor.

The Environment
Oral Questions

2:25 p.m.

NDP

Megan Leslie Halifax, NS

Mr. Speaker, if the Minister of Natural Resources were not pretending to still be living in the 19th century, he would understand the importance of sustainable development for future generations.

He would also see that people are worried about the Conservatives' lack of action on the environment.

The minister can choose to continue to cater to the oil lobby and climate change deniers or he can listen to Canadians who are worried about their communities.

What will he choose?

The Environment
Oral Questions

2:25 p.m.

Eglinton—Lawrence
Ontario

Conservative

Joe Oliver Minister of Natural Resources

Mr. Speaker, a while ago the member opposite insulted Canadian seniors. Now, she is insulting our ancestors. When will it stop? Sir John A. Macdonald knew what a nation-building project would do. Today, this government knows that it will produce jobs, economic growth and revenue for governments to support social programs like health, education and—

The Environment
Oral Questions

2:25 p.m.

Some hon. members

Oh, oh!

The Environment
Oral Questions

2:30 p.m.

Conservative

The Speaker Andrew Scheer

Order, please. It is only the second day back. I am going to ask members for a bit of co-operation. I am having an increasingly difficult time. Order, please.

The hon. member for Halifax.

The Environment
Oral Questions

2:30 p.m.

NDP

Megan Leslie Halifax, NS

Mr. Speaker, I was looking for an answer from the minister but I guess today that is too much to ask. Let us try a different route.

Yesterday, the minister said that radical groups oppose the development of hydrocarbons but surely the minister must—

The Environment
Oral Questions

2:30 p.m.

An hon. member

Go with the multiple choice.

The Environment
Oral Questions

2:30 p.m.

Conservative

The Speaker Andrew Scheer

Order, please. The member for Cape Breton—Canso has to let the member for Halifax put the question.

The Environment
Oral Questions

2:30 p.m.

NDP

Megan Leslie Halifax, NS

I do appreciate his encouragement, Mr. Speaker.

Surely the minister knows the basics of his file. He must know that hydrocarbons are a leading cause of climate change. Can the minister tell us if he agrees with the scientific link between hydrocarbons and climate change, yes or no?

The Environment
Oral Questions

2:30 p.m.

Eglinton—Lawrence
Ontario

Conservative

Joe Oliver Minister of Natural Resources

Mr. Speaker, what I said yesterday is the government's policy. We will only approve projects that are safe for Canadians and for the environment. We are in favour of projects which will create jobs and economic activity and which will be nation builders for Canadians right across this country, from coast to coast to coast.

The Environment
Oral Questions

2:30 p.m.

NDP

Megan Leslie Halifax, NS

Mr. Speaker, I did not hear an answer. Maybe that is because the minister does not understand the question. Hydrocarbons are these tiny little compounds that form a gas called methane. Methane is a greenhouse gas that causes climate change. This is not theology; this is science.

I will ask again. Does the minister understand and agree that hydrocarbons cause climate change, yes or no?

The Environment
Oral Questions

2:30 p.m.

Eglinton—Lawrence
Ontario

Conservative

Joe Oliver Minister of Natural Resources

Mr. Speaker, the government has invested over $10 billion in reducing greenhouse gas emissions, creating energy efficiency programs. The oil sands, which represent one one-thousandth of global emissions, have had their emissions reduced by over 30% in the last 12 years. The gap between oil sands oil and conventional oil is narrow, about 5% to 10%, and it is narrowing even further. We favour technological innovation which will improve the performance of the oil sands.

The Environment
Oral Questions

2:30 p.m.

NDP

Megan Leslie Halifax, NS

Mr. Speaker, the minister cannot answer this question. Let us back up a bit. He is right in the sense that there is a radical—