House of Commons Hansard #106 of the 41st Parliament, 1st Session. (The original version is on Parliament's site.) The word of the day was budget.

Topics

Gasoline Prices
Oral Questions

3 p.m.

Mégantic—L'Érable
Québec

Conservative

Christian Paradis Minister of Industry and Minister of State (Agriculture)

Mr. Speaker, what is really interesting is that the member is a carbon tax advocate. Imagine the devastating effect of such a tax.

On this side of the House, we have a responsible government that reduced the GST by two percentage points and tabled a budget in that same vein, a budget that keeps taxes low. We also implemented the Fairness at the Pumps Act. These measures are having a tangible impact and are the complete opposite of a carbon tax, which would have a devastating impact on jobs in Canada.

Gasoline Prices
Oral Questions

3 p.m.

NDP

Glenn Thibeault Sudbury, ON

Mr. Speaker, Conservatives have no problem dishing out lavish tax subsidies to their friends in big oil, but when it comes to protecting families from gas pump ripoffs, they are asleep at the wheel.

Canadians again woke up this morning to soaring gas prices, and Canadians struggling to get by are sick of being gouged by oil companies every time there is a long weekend upon us. For years, New Democrats have called for an independent gas price ombudsman to finally put an end to these ripoffs.

When will the Conservatives stop putting big oil ahead of Canadians?

Gasoline Prices
Oral Questions

3 p.m.

Mégantic—L'Érable
Québec

Conservative

Christian Paradis Minister of Industry and Minister of State (Agriculture)

Mr. Speaker, if the member were serious about this matter, he would stop advocating for a carbon tax, which would be devastating for the economy of Canada. Moreover, instead of pushing for higher taxes on Canadians, like the NDP would do, we reduced the GST by two points and we put measures of fairness at the pumps. These things work. Not later than last month, three companies were guilty of fixing prices.

This is real action and totally the opposite of advocating a carbon tax that would be devastating for the economy.

The Budget
Oral Questions

3 p.m.

Conservative

Dave Van Kesteren Chatham-Kent—Essex, ON

Mr. Speaker, our Conservative government understands that Canada's long-term prosperity means expanding beyond our borders. It means promoting Canada on the world stage to succeed with more trade and encouraging more investment. Unfortunately, the NDP does not understand this concept. The only time the NDP reaches beyond our borders is to collude with radical left-wing groups that want to halt our economic growth and cost hard-working Canadians their jobs.

Can the parliamentary secretary please tell the House how economic action plan 2012 is helping create jobs and contribute to Canada's long-term prosperity?

The Budget
Oral Questions

3 p.m.

Saint Boniface
Manitoba

Conservative

Shelly Glover Parliamentary Secretary to the Minister of Finance

Mr. Speaker, I want to thank the member for Chatham-Kent—Essex for his hard work in the finance committee and on the budget.

Since 2006, our Conservative government has worked hard to make Canada the best place in the world to do business, to create jobs and, of course, to open new markets. Of course, the budget is going to continue that, and the world is taking notice. Listen to what an editorial in The Wall Street Journal said just today:

Not too many years ago, Americans could get away with cracking jokes about spendthrift Canada.... These days, the joke is on Americans.... The governing Conservative Party took another step forward last week with a pledge to balance the budget by 2015 without raising taxes.... As America's recent performance proves, the wealth of a nation isn't guaranteed. Canada shows how mistakes can be reversed with sound policies.

The Environment
Oral Questions

3 p.m.

Liberal

Kirsty Duncan Etobicoke North, ON

Mr. Speaker, the environment minister could not name a single organization that could replace the national round table. Here are a few: the Canadian Foundation for Climate and Atmospheric Science and the National Science Advisor, eliminated by Conservatives; Environment Canada and Fisheries and Oceans, cut to the bone; environmental advocates, targeted.

With legislation gutted and critics silenced, what is to stand in the way of environmental disaster?

The Environment
Oral Questions

3:05 p.m.

Thornhill
Ontario

Conservative

Peter Kent Minister of the Environment

Mr. Speaker, as I said the other day, I was surprised my colleague had to ask. There is a plethora, in fact, of groups and organizations across academia and across business, even many NGOs, domestic as well as international, that do have today the scientific and research capacity that did not exist broadly when the national round table was created.

Our government has thanked the round table for its decades of work, and we are committed to an orderly, considerate wind-down of the organization.

Rights & Democracy
Oral Questions

April 4th, 2012 / 3:05 p.m.

NDP

Hélène Laverdière Laurier—Sainte-Marie, QC

Mr. Speaker, yesterday, the Conservatives announced that they were going to shut down Rights & Democracy, citing the organizations's many problems as the reason.

The problem is that the Conservatives inherited an organization that is respected around the world and when they started appointing their little friends to the organization and gave it a partisan direction, the ship started sinking.

Canada is losing its position and reputation when it comes to promoting democracy. This is another black eye for Canada.

Why do the Conservatives insist on undermining our credibility on the international stage?

Rights & Democracy
Oral Questions

3:05 p.m.

Ottawa West—Nepean
Ontario

Conservative

John Baird Minister of Foreign Affairs

Mr. Speaker, it will not come as any surprise to members of this place that I do not share the views of the member opposite.

We do believe in promoting freedom. We do believe in promoting democracy and human rights. Promoting Canadian values is one of the two priorities of this government and our foreign policy. Our men and women who work in the foreign service, our ambassadors, high commissioners, consul generals and consuls will continue to do that each and every day right around the world.

Pensions
Oral Questions

3:05 p.m.

Conservative

Mike Wallace Burlington, ON

Mr. Speaker, our government understands the importance of a secure and dignified retirement for people who have spent their lives building Canada through hard work. That is why in 2006, we have taken action to ensure that retirement income is sustainable and is there when Canadians need it.

Will the Minister of State for Seniors please update the House on the measures we are taking to ensure that Canadians' retirement income is sustainable today and tomorrow?

Pensions
Oral Questions

3:05 p.m.

Richmond
B.C.

Conservative

Alice Wong Minister of State (Seniors)

Mr. Speaker, I would like to thank the member for Burlington for the question. That is exactly what we are doing.

That is why, since 2006, we have introduced such measures as pension income splitting, billions in annual tax relief for seniors and the largest GIS increase in 25 years.

But we also need to ensure that future generations can count on sustainable retirement benefits when they need them. Changes made to OAS will be phased in between 2023 and 2029, giving Canadians up to 17 years to plan and adjust accordingly. No current recipients will be affected. That is the good message for all Canadians.

National Defence
Oral Questions

3:05 p.m.

NDP

Élaine Michaud Portneuf—Jacques-Cartier, QC

Mr. Speaker, military bases are going to suffer the consequences of the Conservatives' cuts. Troop support staff positions are going to be cut on bases across the country. In all, more than 1,000 jobs will be lost. In my riding, CFB Valcartier will lose 150 jobs. That is huge.

A few months ago, I asked the minister whether he had any intention of making cuts at Valcartier. He accused me of not supporting the troops.

Is cutting jobs his strategy for supporting the troops?

National Defence
Oral Questions

3:05 p.m.

Central Nova
Nova Scotia

Conservative

Peter MacKay Minister of National Defence

Mr. Speaker, that is not true. It is false, as usual.

With the return to a more normal operational tempo, and with the end of the Canadian Forces combat mission in Afghanistan, we are now focused on redirecting our staff and other resources toward long-term sustainability.

It is true that the member and her party have opposed every investment we have made in equipment, in bases, in support for the men and women in uniform and their families.

Transport
Oral Questions

3:05 p.m.

Green

Elizabeth May Saanich—Gulf Islands, BC

Mr. Speaker, the Prime Minister for many years expressed concern as an Albertan about the heavy-handed intrusion of federal policy on the will of Albertans.

Right now, British Columbians oppose supertankers on the coastline, the Union of British Columbia Municipalities opposes the supertankers and today's polls show, by a margin of three to one, that British Columbians do not want oil tankers on their coastline.

Will the Prime Minister run roughshod over the will of British Columbians for his pet project?

Transport
Oral Questions

3:10 p.m.

Roberval—Lac-Saint-Jean
Québec

Conservative

Denis Lebel Minister of Transport

Mr. Speaker, our government is confident that sound regulations are in place to ensure petroleum products are transported safely along the B.C. coast.

In the last five years, close to 500 supertankers have been close to the shores with no accidents. All tankers arriving in Canadian ports are inspected by Transport Canada to ensure that they comply with all Canadian and international regulations.