House of Commons Hansard #129 of the 41st Parliament, 1st Session. (The original version is on Parliament's site.) The word of the day was work.

Topics

Ethics
Oral Questions

2:35 p.m.

NDP

Alexandre Boulerice Rosemont—La Petite-Patrie, QC

Mr. Speaker, if you want to see beautiful images from the four corners of the world, sign up for the Grands Explorateurs. A season ticket to attend six fascinating talks costs $83.50.

That is quite a bit cheaper than the $10,000 it cost to send the president of the Old Port of Montreal Corporation on a trip. What is more, the president, upon her return, submitted a report consisting mainly of slides. Clearly, a fish rots from the top down.

Conservative ministers have demonstrated that it is okay to live high off the hog at taxpayers' expense. It is not surprising that others are trying to take advantage.

When are the Conservatives going to restore a responsible, ethical culture?

Ethics
Oral Questions

2:35 p.m.

Edmonton—Spruce Grove
Alberta

Conservative

Rona Ambrose Minister of Public Works and Government Services and Minister for Status of Women

Mr. Speaker, we all share the member's concern and partly his outrage, but at this point we have asked the Auditor General to do an audit and we appreciate that he has accepted to do that.

Furthermore, at my request, the Old Port has agreed to take on a third party independent company to sit in at the Old Port to review and sign off on all expenditures going forward.

Labour
Oral Questions

2:35 p.m.

NDP

Alexandre Boulerice Rosemont—La Petite-Patrie, QC

Mr. Speaker, impunity and hypocrisy are the Conservatives' trademark.

When it came time to protect the economy of the Montreal region, protect jobs and enforce the Air Canada Act, the Conservatives sat on their hands. They did nothing. Aveos employees were not entitled to the special treatment received by CP, Air Canada and Canada Post management.

Once again, the Conservatives have waded into a conflict involving a private company. Why this misplaced interventionism? The invisible hand of the Conservatives has once again got a stranglehold on workers and their rights.

Why are the Conservatives so bent on repeatedly sabotaging negotiations?

Labour
Oral Questions

2:35 p.m.

Halton
Ontario

Conservative

Lisa Raitt Minister of Labour

Mr. Speaker, obviously the member did not watch the media on the weekend because, if he had, he would have realized that both parties have been unable to conclude a deal in the case of CP Rail, and, even though we have offered them 120 days of extra mediation, they have rejected that offer as well.

There is not question that the economy is being affected, which is why our government has tabled legislation and why we will be debating it this evening.

Pensions
Oral Questions

2:35 p.m.

NDP

Irene Mathyssen London—Fanshawe, ON

Mr. Speaker, when will the Conservatives figure out that workers are the back bone of the economy. The Conservatives' back-to-work legislation also attacks workers' pensions. The CPP fund is at the heart of this dispute. The government is siding with a profitable company that has decided to go after employees' pensions just for more profit.

Employees play by the rules and pay for their own pensions. Why are the Conservatives always picking winners and losers and why are workers' pensions always under attack?

Pensions
Oral Questions

2:35 p.m.

Halton
Ontario

Conservative

Lisa Raitt Minister of Labour

Mr. Speaker, if the hon. member would actually read the legislation she would see that it does not predetermine any issue. In fact, by introducing this legislation, we are acting on the side of the Canadian economy and the general Canadian public interest.

We are not the ones taking sides. I do not think the opposition can say the same thing.

National Defence
Oral Questions

2:35 p.m.

Liberal

John McKay Scarborough—Guildwood, ON

Mr. Speaker, the Conservative government's passion for secrecy is legendary. First it deceived Canadians with a so-called $10 billion accounting error. Then it refused to release the statement of requirements. It then said that there was a contract and then said that there was no contract. Then, when MPs may wish to examine ministers and other witnesses about the F-35, it shuts down the committee.

When will the Conservative government commit to govern with transparency rather than stealth?

National Defence
Oral Questions

2:35 p.m.

North Vancouver
B.C.

Conservative

Andrew Saxton Parliamentary Secretary to the President of the Treasury Board and for Western Economic Diversification

Mr. Speaker, as the member opposite knows, we have had a thorough study of the Auditor General's report. In fact, we have had the Auditor General come to committee on three separate occasions to discuss this chapter. We have had senior officials from the departments come to committee on two separate occasions. We have had the Parliamentary Budget Officer come to committee to discuss his calculations. We have had ministers also come before the committee of the whole for hours to answer all of the questions of the opposition.

It is time to get going and for the opposition to quit playing political games and get this report written.

Search and Rescue
Oral Questions

2:35 p.m.

Liberal

Marc Garneau Westmount—Ville-Marie, QC

Mr. Speaker, after so many years, we have learned there will finally be a competition to replace the search and rescue aircraft. The reason for this is clear: the operational needs for this aircraft were referred to the National Research Council for review and modification in order to guarantee an open and transparent competition.

If the process is good enough for that kind of aircraft, then why not for the CF-18s? Will the operational needs for the aircraft to replace the CF-18s be referred to the National Research Council for review, and will there be an open and transparent competition?

Search and Rescue
Oral Questions

2:40 p.m.

Vaughan
Ontario

Conservative

Julian Fantino Associate Minister of National Defence

Mr. Speaker, search and rescue is a critical aspect for Canadian society and our government recognizes this fact. Our plans include proceeding as expeditiously as possible on the project. We will continue responsible management of this file, including consultations with industry. We are exploring options that will result in the best outcomes for search and rescue and the best benefits for Canadian taxpayers.

Standing Committee on Public Accounts
Oral Questions

May 29th, 2012 / 2:40 p.m.

Liberal

Gerry Byrne Humber—St. Barbe—Baie Verte, NL

Mr. Speaker, my question is for the chair of the public accounts committee.

In April, I moved motions to call for witnesses and to summon documents as part of the committee's study on the F-35 fiasco. Despite my motions having been previously called and still up for debate, the chair chose not to allow them to proceed.

My question is about the agenda of the committee. Why has the chair not allowed my motions to be dealt with and will he commit that, before proceeding to other business, he will allow my motions to be properly debated and properly voted on?

Standing Committee on Public Accounts
Oral Questions

2:40 p.m.

NDP

David Christopherson Hamilton Centre, ON

Mr. Speaker, I am pleased to answer the question.

First, notwithstanding the fact that he is referring to matters that were dealt with in an in camera meeting and he understands the rules around that--

Standing Committee on Public Accounts
Oral Questions

2:40 p.m.

Some hon. members

Oh, oh!

Standing Committee on Public Accounts
Oral Questions

2:40 p.m.

NDP

David Christopherson Hamilton Centre, ON

Let me answer the question.

The first part of the answer is that--

Standing Committee on Public Accounts
Oral Questions

2:40 p.m.

Some hon. members

Oh, oh!