House of Commons Hansard #117 of the 41st Parliament, 1st Session. (The original version is on Parliament's site.) The word of the day was housing.

Topics

Ministerial Expenditures
Oral Questions

11:40 a.m.

NDP

Mathieu Ravignat Pontiac, QC

Madam Speaker, yesterday, the President of the Treasury Board also chose to single out Nova Scotia's NDP government. He accused the members of that government of the same thing he is doing: making excessive use of their drivers and limousines, which are paid for with taxpayers' money.

The facts are clear: the Dexter government ministers do not even have drivers. The NDP government is fiscally responsible.

Perhaps the minister can take one of the limousines he has on standby and go apologize.

Ministerial Expenditures
Oral Questions

May 4th, 2012 / 11:45 a.m.

North Vancouver
B.C.

Conservative

Andrew Saxton Parliamentary Secretary to the President of the Treasury Board and for Western Economic Diversification

Madam Speaker, I said it once and I will say it again: we are always looking for ways to run the government at a more reasonable cost to taxpayers.

Ministers work long hours, and drivers frequently have to work the hours the ministers work. Salaries and overtime for drivers employed by the public service are based on collective agreements with unions.

Ministerial Expenditures
Oral Questions

11:45 a.m.

NDP

Mathieu Ravignat Pontiac, QC

Madam Speaker, taxpayers do not want excuses, they want action.

Yesterday the President of the Treasury Board accused two provincial governments of using chauffeur services, but the facts are clear. In Nova Scotia ministers in Darrell Dexter's cabinet do not even use limos. They did away with their driver service after they took power. To do what? To save money.

Perhaps the minister could send his standby driver out to Nova Scotia and Manitoba to learn how responsible ministers respect taxpayer dollars.

Ministerial Expenditures
Oral Questions

11:45 a.m.

North Vancouver
B.C.

Conservative

Andrew Saxton Parliamentary Secretary to the President of the Treasury Board and for Western Economic Diversification

Madam Speaker, this is like Groundhog Day all over again. We are always looking for ways to run the government at a reasonable cost to taxpayers.

I will tell the House what we have done. We have frozen the salaries of MPs, including the salary of the member opposite. We have frozen the salaries of senators. We have reduced ministers' office spending, reduced the cost of travel and reduced hospitality spending.

This government is taking real action to reduce the cost to taxpayers.

Health
Oral Questions

11:45 a.m.

Conservative

Dick Harris Cariboo—Prince George, BC

Madam Speaker, yesterday the hon. Minister of Health made a most important announcement of funding that would go a long way to helping Canadians facing neurological disorders. This is yet another example of this government's commitment to helping Canadians maintain and improve their health.

Would the hon. minister please share this good news with the members of the House?

Health
Oral Questions

11:45 a.m.

Nunavut
Nunavut

Conservative

Leona Aglukkaq Minister of Health and Minister of the Canadian Northern Economic Development Agency

Madam Speaker, one in three Canadians face a neurological disorder or related problems at some point in life.

Yesterday I was happy to announce funding to the Brain Canada Foundation to establish a research fund that would support the understanding and treatment of brain disorders. This investment will strengthen Canada's position as a world leader in research and in the identification and treatment of brain disorders.

This funding and the research it will support are central to our government's commitment to help Canadians maintain and improve their health.

International Cooperation
Oral Questions

11:45 a.m.

NDP

Romeo Saganash Abitibi—Baie-James—Nunavik—Eeyou, QC

Madam Speaker, the true impact of the Conservatives' decision to cut international aid is becoming clear.

As expected, not only are the employees feeling the effects, but so are programs and services. While the minister is drinking $16 glasses of orange juice, Canada is cutting its funding to the fight against TB by $10 million.

How did this government come up with these ridiculous priorities? Will it reverse its decision on these reckless cuts?

International Cooperation
Oral Questions

11:45 a.m.

Newmarket—Aurora
Ontario

Conservative

Lois Brown Parliamentary Secretary to the Minister of International Cooperation

Madam Speaker, budget 2012 has confirmed that Canada's international development assistance will continue our commitment to make international assistance focused, effective, accountable and transparent.

Canadian tax dollars will continue to deliver value for money and make a real difference in the lives of the people they are intended to help. We will continue our efforts in this direction and build on the steps that we have taken so far.

International Cooperation
Oral Questions

11:45 a.m.

NDP

Romeo Saganash Abitibi—Baie-James—Nunavik—Eeyou, QC

Madam Speaker, while the minister is living high on the hog, Canada is ending aid to Rwanda, Nepal, Zambia, Zimbabwe, Malawi, Niger and Cambodia. Canada is delivering less and less aid where the need is greatest.

When will the government stop backsliding on foreign aid and focus on the world's poor instead of the minister's comfort?

International Cooperation
Oral Questions

11:45 a.m.

Newmarket—Aurora
Ontario

Conservative

Lois Brown Parliamentary Secretary to the Minister of International Cooperation

Madam Speaker, as I said, our government remains committed to focused, effective, accountable and transparent development that makes a real difference in the lives of the people in Africa.

The African continent continues to be Canada's largest recipient of international assistance. We are focusing 80% of the $1.1 billion in funding for maternal, newborn and child health through the Muskoka initiative in sub-Saharan Africa.

Agri-Food
Oral Questions

11:45 a.m.

NDP

Pierre Jacob Brome—Missisquoi, QC

Madam Speaker, the closure of the Frelighsburg experimental farm is a slap in the face to Quebec fruit farmers. The Eastern Townships region has many apple producers, grape growers and berry producers.

The Government of Quebec has promised to protect the experimental farms and the work done there, but the Conservative government is completely abandoning small-scale farmers and the regions of Quebec.

My question is simple: why are the Conservatives abandoning our farmers once again?

Agri-Food
Oral Questions

11:50 a.m.

Glengarry—Prescott—Russell
Ontario

Conservative

Pierre Lemieux Parliamentary Secretary to the Minister of Agriculture

Madam Speaker, this government is focused on food safety. This government is focused on our agricultural sector. We have had nothing but success, which farmers all across the country know.

When it comes to different facilities and the recent budget, combining labs and expertise will ensure that this important work is carried out in better-equipped facilities with better resources.

Infrastructure
Oral Questions

11:50 a.m.

NDP

Nathan Cullen Skeena—Bulkley Valley, BC

Madam Speaker, recently the House stood for a moment of silence to commemorate the day of mourning for those killed and injured at work. People from all across Canada were shocked to hear about the recent tragedy on Alberta's Highway 63. Our hearts go out to those families who lost loved ones.

All Canadians benefit from the development of our natural resources and they want these industries, above all else, to be safe. The twinning of Highway 63 is needed, and the people in Fort McMurray and Alberta are rightly frustrated.

Is the government willing to offer whatever support is needed to prevent this type of tragedy from ever happening again?

Infrastructure
Oral Questions

11:50 a.m.

Nepean—Carleton
Ontario

Conservative

Pierre Poilievre Parliamentary Secretary to the Minister of Transport

Madam Speaker, first of all, I would like to echo my colleague's comments. All the tragedies and all the accidents that take place on our highways are very sad, and we fully support all victims and their families.

Our government has invested in infrastructure and is achieving results. In fact, the average age of a piece of infrastructure in Canada is lower than it has been in the past 30 years.

National Defence
Oral Questions

11:50 a.m.

Liberal

Carolyn Bennett St. Paul's, ON

Madam Speaker, the facts are clear. The number of suicides among Canadian Forces personnel increased from 12 in 2010 to 20 lives lost last year.

An internal report describes the mental health treatment system in crisis. Despite this, the department is slashing, and 60% of the civilian health workers are losing their jobs, including PTSD specialists and suicide prevention specialists. Why?