House of Commons Hansard #117 of the 41st Parliament, 1st Session. (The original version is on Parliament's site.) The word of the day was housing.

Topics

National Defence
Oral Questions

11:20 a.m.

NDP

Christine Moore Abitibi—Témiscamingue, QC

Madam Speaker, taxpayers are no fools. Between the Conservatives' version of the story and the Parliamentary Budget Officer's objective facts, the taxpayers will figure out what is going on. The Deputy Minister of National Defence confirmed that the figure given to cabinet was $25 billion. However, as the Parliamentary Budget Officer said yesterday, unfortunately that is the not the figure the Conservatives communicated to the public.

Lies and confusion reign in this file.

Who, in this government, made the decision to communicate false figures to the taxpayers?

National Defence
Oral Questions

11:20 a.m.

Ajax—Pickering
Ontario

Conservative

Chris Alexander Parliamentary Secretary to the Minister of National Defence

Madam Speaker, this government assumes all of its responsibilities. We presented the costs in accordance with Canadian procurement practices. We have never hidden the operational costs of the CF-18s.

What is more, the absolutely final costs for the entire life cycle of a plane to replace the CF-18s will be presented to this House in the coming years. They will be confirmed independently by an authority chosen by the Treasury Board.

Democracy
Oral Questions

May 4th, 2012 / 11:20 a.m.

Liberal

Marc Garneau Westmount—Ville-Marie, QC

Madam Speaker, yesterday, the Conservatives forced time allocation for the 18th time on a massive omnibus budget implementation plan. What a legacy; 18 time allocations in their first year as a majority.

This is an incredible standard they are setting for this House of Commons. They are trying to prevent members from debating a 420-page document that amends or kills 70 acts of Parliament.

My question is for the backbenchers on that side of the House who surely campaigned in the last election to fight for democracy. Why are they so silent now? Why are they--

Democracy
Oral Questions

11:20 a.m.

NDP

The Deputy Speaker Denise Savoie

Order, please. The hon. government House leader.

Democracy
Oral Questions

11:20 a.m.

York—Simcoe
Ontario

Conservative

Peter Van Loan Leader of the Government in the House of Commons

Madam Speaker, the priority of this government is job creation and economic growth and that is what economic action plan 2012 delivers.

We are proud that we have set aside more time for the debate on this bill than any other budget implementation bill in the last two decades, probably longer, but that is as far back as we went in our research. It is certainly a contrast with the party that the hon. member was part of when it was in government. The Liberals passed one budget implementation bill and sent it to committee, limiting debate to three hours.

We are happy to have this bill debated for the longest time in this House because for once we want to hear members from that side talk about the economy. That is our priority.

Democracy
Oral Questions

11:25 a.m.

Liberal

Marc Garneau Westmount—Ville-Marie, QC

Madam Speaker, let us compare the facts and talk about the reality of the situation.

Under the Liberals, budget implementation bills were rarely over 100 pages long. With this government, they have been 420 pages, 528 pages and 644 pages long—all huge documents.

Why does this government pretend to allocate enough time to talk about democracy, when really, its utter contempt for democracy is clear?

Democracy
Oral Questions

11:25 a.m.

York—Simcoe
Ontario

Conservative

Peter Van Loan Leader of the Government in the House of Commons

Madam Speaker, as I said, the time set aside for debate on this budget bill is much longer than the average amount of time set aside by any Liberal government.

This is the longest debate on a budget implementation bill in at least the past two decades, perhaps the longest ever, but the Liberals are against it. Why? It is because that party is led by someone who does not recognize this kind of budget because it does not increase taxes, something his party did 32 times when he was premier of Ontario. It does not result in a massive deficit. It works, in fact, to balance the budget, which is something he never did when he was in--

Democracy
Oral Questions

11:25 a.m.

NDP

The Deputy Speaker Denise Savoie

Order, please. The hon. member for Saint-Laurent—Cartierville.

Foreign Affairs
Oral Questions

11:25 a.m.

Liberal

Stéphane Dion Saint-Laurent—Cartierville, QC

Madam Speaker, the Minister of Foreign Affairs is killing the understanding Canada program, throwing away 30 years of Canadian study.

With little means, this program generated Canadian study centres globally, thousands of articles, books, Ph.D.s and M.A.s on Canada.

The government will not save money. For each dollar invested, $14 are spent in Canada by the international Canadian studies community.

Will the minister keep open this world window on Canada?

Foreign Affairs
Oral Questions

11:25 a.m.

Ottawa West—Nepean
Ontario

Conservative

John Baird Minister of Foreign Affairs

Madam Speaker, we are making some decisions to ensure that we live within our means and that we return to balanced budgets and fiscal sanity in this country.

We have made decisions in the Department of Foreign Affairs on how we can best spend our valuable taxpayer dollars and we believe this is the right decision toward that end.

Budget Implementation
Oral Questions

11:25 a.m.

NDP

Guy Caron Rimouski-Neigette—Témiscouata—Les Basques, QC

Madam Speaker, when the government wants Canadians to accept unpopular measures, it always ends up ramming these measures down their throats.

Yesterday, the government invoked closure for the 18th time, in this case on the budget implementation bill, which is full of measures that Canadians did not vote for.

Why are the Conservatives so set on cutting short any debate on their controversial measures? Is it because their budget does not add up?

Budget Implementation
Oral Questions

11:25 a.m.

Macleod
Alberta

Conservative

Ted Menzies Minister of State (Finance)

Madam Speaker, that was very much a fact-free question. I do recall campaigning on jobs, the economy and long-term prosperity for the country. That is exactly what we on this side of the House campaigned on. This is the opposite of the NDP members, who were campaigning on higher taxes to kill jobs.

In the budget we extended the hiring credit for new hires and a benefit for young people. The youth employment strategy, raised in the House many times, is funded in this budget.

Budget Implementation
Oral Questions

11:25 a.m.

NDP

Guy Caron Rimouski-Neigette—Témiscouata—Les Basques, QC

Madam Speaker, if the Conservatives like to approve 425-page bills without reading or analyzing them, where is their rigour?

We know that the devil is in the details, and Bill C-38 has many details that are perplexing, such as amendments to the Bank Act that will infringe on provincial powers. This is not at all acceptable to the Government of Quebec.

Why is the government insisting on interfering in provincial jurisdictions?

Budget Implementation
Oral Questions

11:25 a.m.

Macleod
Alberta

Conservative

Ted Menzies Minister of State (Finance)

Madam Speaker, this gives me the opportunity to point out the strength in Canada's financial sector. Four years in a row the World Economic Forum has said that Canada's banking system is the best in the world. That is something to be proud of.

We do need to make sure that these rules that are under federal jurisdiction are enforced all across the provinces. That is why we continue to make sure that the banks follow the regulations that we put in place, so we can maintain that incredible record that is the envy of the world.

Budget Implementation
Oral Questions

11:30 a.m.

NDP

Nycole Turmel Hull—Aylmer, QC

Madam Speaker, this is the 18th time that the Conservatives have invoked closure, a record that this government should be ashamed of.

The government is ramming a 425-page monster bill down Canadians' throats, a bill that is replete with measures that will set us back dozens of years, measures that will endanger our environment, harm our health system and make Canadians' lives more precarious.

What does the government want to hide from Canadians by preventing this debate? What are the Conservatives afraid of?