House of Commons Hansard #132 of the 41st Parliament, 1st Session. (The original version is on Parliament's site.) The word of the day was refugees.

Topics

Fisheries and Oceans
Oral Questions

11:35 a.m.

Pitt Meadows—Maple Ridge—Mission
B.C.

Conservative

Randy Kamp Parliamentary Secretary to the Minister of Fisheries and Oceans and for the Asia-Pacific Gateway

Mr. Speaker, I think my colleague is suffering from the heartbreak of premature exaggeration.

We have said a number of times in this House that the Minister of Fisheries and Oceans had a conversation with fisheries stakeholders about changes they would propose in order to make the fisheries more prosperous and sustainable for the future. The minister and his officials are continuing to look at that feedback and will make some decisions in the future.

Fisheries and Oceans
Oral Questions

11:35 a.m.

Liberal

Joyce Murray Vancouver Quadra, BC

Mr. Speaker, a batch of weak responses and inappropriate jokes when 1,000 people are being cut from the staff of Department of Fisheries and Oceans.

It is unworthy to assault knowledgeable and dedicated former ministers for voicing their real concerns about the plan to weaken habitat protection for fish. The government's strategy is to attack anyone who disagrees with it. The four former fisheries ministers from B.C. are just the latest targets.

West coast salmon are far too important to British Columbians to be lost because of the government's petty ideology and gross mismanagement. Why condemn the Pacific fisheries to the fate of the Atlantic cod?

Fisheries and Oceans
Oral Questions

11:35 a.m.

Pitt Meadows—Maple Ridge—Mission
B.C.

Conservative

Randy Kamp Parliamentary Secretary to the Minister of Fisheries and Oceans and for the Asia-Pacific Gateway

Mr. Speaker, we did not have much of a conversation with former minister Siddon about Atlantic cod. I suppose we could have.

Let me remind the member that salmon are part of aboriginal, commercial and recreational fisheries. We are going to be protecting those with excellence to ensure that they are available for future generations.

Ministerial Expenses
Oral Questions

11:35 a.m.

Liberal

Mark Eyking Sydney—Victoria, NS

Mr. Speaker, the Minister of International Cooperation is well known for her lavish spending habits and was recently forced to repay taxpayers again for impulsive hotel changes and limos.

Yesterday we learned that she changed her public travel expense claims with no explanation.

Is the minister ready to admit that there are more $16 glasses of orange juice that she has charged to taxpayers? When will she be accountable for her bad behaviour?

Ministerial Expenses
Oral Questions

11:35 a.m.

York—Simcoe
Ontario

Conservative

Peter Van Loan Leader of the Government in the House of Commons

Mr. Speaker, I think I have answered this a number of times.

Our government is committed to keeping expenses of ministers travelling at a reasonable cost to taxpayers. That is why they are much lower than the hon. member's party spent on ministerial travel when that party was in government.

In the case of the minister in question, all inappropriate costs have been repaid.

Ministerial Expenses
Oral Questions

June 1st, 2012 / 11:40 a.m.

Liberal

Mark Eyking Sydney—Victoria, NS

Mr. Speaker, the Conservatives think it is okay to steal from the poor.

The CIDA minister is an embarrassment to Canada. She is abandoning the world's poorest of the poor by cutting over $400 million from the CIDA budget, just like a laser. At the same time, she is sipping on $16 glasses of orange juice and picking up the tab for wealthy mining companies.

The minister cannot even manage her own travel expenses let alone Canada's international aid and development.

When will the Prime Minister fire the incompetent minister?

Ministerial Expenses
Oral Questions

11:40 a.m.

York—Simcoe
Ontario

Conservative

Peter Van Loan Leader of the Government in the House of Commons

Mr. Speaker, by that member's standard when his Liberal Party was in government, every single minister in that government would have had to resign. The hospitality expenses of ministers in this government are a small fraction of what the Liberals spent on hospitality. In fact, the spending of all ministers in this government is well below that of the Liberals.

In the case of this one minister, any inappropriate spending has all been repaid.

Fisheries and Oceans
Oral Questions

11:40 a.m.

NDP

Dennis Bevington Western Arctic, NT

Mr. Speaker, climate change is opening the Arctic Ocean to fishing for the first time.

Currently there is no international agreement on Arctic Ocean fisheries. Over 2,000 global scientists have called upon the five Arctic coastal countries to hold back the start of commercial fishing in Arctic waters until research is done and management plans are in place.

Canada knows how much damage is done by unregulated international fishing.

In 2013 Canada will be the chair of the Arctic Council. Will the government show leadership and push for a treaty governing fishing in the Arctic?

Fisheries and Oceans
Oral Questions

11:40 a.m.

Pitt Meadows—Maple Ridge—Mission
B.C.

Conservative

Randy Kamp Parliamentary Secretary to the Minister of Fisheries and Oceans and for the Asia-Pacific Gateway

Mr. Speaker, the member has raised an important issue.

The minister is engaged in this. He will be consulting, obviously, with his officials and will be moving forward with what is in the best interests of Canada.

Aboriginal Affairs
Oral Questions

11:40 a.m.

NDP

Dennis Bevington Western Arctic, NT

Mr. Speaker, the Conservatives' hastily announced hunting and angling advisory panel has angered Canada's first nations, Métis and Inuit with their exclusion. They see this action as another attempt by the government to cut them out of environmental decision-making. This is similar to the way the Conservatives want to dismantle environmental review boards in the Northwest Territories.

At the same time, the Minister of Aboriginal Affairs and Northern Development will not reappoint the Inuit chair of the Nunavut Impact Review Board.

Why do the Conservatives want to shut out first nations, Métis and Inuit from roles in protecting their lands and their resources?

Aboriginal Affairs
Oral Questions

11:40 a.m.

York—Simcoe
Ontario

Conservative

Peter Van Loan Leader of the Government in the House of Commons

Mr. Speaker, this is about supporting the traditional practices in Canada of hunting and fishing. This includes the ability of people to engage in those traditional practices, practices that were being interfered with by the very policies supported by that member and the NDP in terms of Canada's long gun registry. We have taken steps to ensure that the long gun registry is now out of the way so that those traditional rights can be preserved.

We are going to have an ongoing dialogue. We are certainly happy to look at others who are interested in supporting those same traditional Canadian values of hunting and fishing.

The Environment
Oral Questions

11:40 a.m.

NDP

Niki Ashton Churchill, MB

Mr. Speaker, the Conservatives' attacks on science have claimed yet another victim, the world-renowned Experimental Lakes Area research program. This is a devastating blow to environmental science that will be felt for generations, particularly in provinces like Manitoba.

There is no other facility in the world that does this work. In fact, the loss of this program is so serious that scientists around the world are speaking out.

Will the government reinstate this vital research program?

The Environment
Oral Questions

11:40 a.m.

Pitt Meadows—Maple Ridge—Mission
B.C.

Conservative

Randy Kamp Parliamentary Secretary to the Minister of Fisheries and Oceans and for the Asia-Pacific Gateway

Mr. Speaker, of course our government is committed to the Freshwater Institute and clean, fresh water. We have shown that by the funds we have put into the Lake Simcoe cleanup fund, for example.

The member is from Manitoba. She knows the Freshwater Institute will still continue to function. We just think that the work done at the Experimental Lakes facility would be better done by a non-governmental association or university.

The Environment
Oral Questions

11:40 a.m.

NDP

John Rafferty Thunder Bay—Rainy River, ON

Mr. Speaker, the Conservatives are simply making stuff up as they go along. The minister knows the Experimental Lakes Area is the research facility that made groundbreaking discoveries about acid rain. He knows it identified and helped reduce mercury contamination in coal-fired plants. He knows phosphorus is banned in detergents now because of the facility's work.

The Conservatives need to wake up. When will they stop their dangerous cuts to put our water, our environment and our health at risk?

The Environment
Oral Questions

11:45 a.m.

Pitt Meadows—Maple Ridge—Mission
B.C.

Conservative

Randy Kamp Parliamentary Secretary to the Minister of Fisheries and Oceans and for the Asia-Pacific Gateway

Mr. Speaker, as I said, we are committed to research on fresh water. That is why much of what we do at the Freshwater Institute in Winnipeg has generated some very good results in Lake Winnipeg, for example, and in other lakes in central Canada.

On this side of the House, we do not believe that the government has to do everything. We think that the Experimental Lakes facility, which was so useful in the acid rain era, now would be better managed by either a university or a non-governmental organization.