House of Commons Hansard #140 of the 41st Parliament, 1st Session. (The original version is on Parliament's site.) The word of the day was yea.

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(The House divided on the motion, which was negatived on the following division:)

Vote #283

Committees of the House
Routine Proceedings

4:20 p.m.

Conservative

The Acting Speaker Barry Devolin

I declare the motion defeated.

There are now five minutes of questions and comments for the hon. member for Winnipeg North.

The hon. member for Vancouver—Quadra.

Committees of the House
Routine Proceedings

4:20 p.m.

Liberal

Joyce Murray Vancouver Quadra, BC

Mr. Speaker, could we stop the clock until people have cleared the room?

Committees of the House
Routine Proceedings

4:20 p.m.

Conservative

The Acting Speaker Barry Devolin

Could all hon. members who are leaving the chamber please do so, so that we might continue and move the agenda forward expeditiously.

The hon. member for Vancouver Quadra.

Committees of the House
Routine Proceedings

4:20 p.m.

Liberal

Joyce Murray Vancouver Quadra, BC

Mr. Speaker, I enjoyed the comments of my colleague from Winnipeg North, who clearly has a lot of experience in supporting small- and medium-size enterprises in his community and province. He is passionate on the subject.

I note that a recent study by the Procurement Ombudsman revealed that while some data are being collected about government procurement, there is a lot of missing data and that the data that are collected are not being used.

Measurement and data collection are key to being able to improve a system and to wider participation in government procurement. Businesses have been asking the government to address the issue for more than six years, saying that there is not proper measurement and not proper evaluation of procurement. Both are key to participation by small- and medium-size business.

Could my colleague tell us how this lack of data and measurement might impact small and medium businesses in the new Canadian community?

Committees of the House
Routine Proceedings

4:20 p.m.

Liberal

Kevin Lamoureux Winnipeg North, MB

Mr. Speaker, the member for Vancouver Quadra demonstrates, just as I indicated in my speech, that the government has dropped the ball in not recognizing the important role it can play in government procurement. Information is gold and we must have the information there in order to make the types of decisions necessary. Whether it is the role of an ombudsman or an opposition member, at the end of the day we want the information to be in the right hands so that more small- and medium-size businesses will be engaged in the whole area of government procurement.

As I tried to illustrate before, having more small- and medium-size businesses engaged in the procurement process equates to more jobs and better quality products. Every Canadian will win in that situation. That is the type of support we want to see and Liberal Party is encouraging the government to take action on that.

Committees of the House
Routine Proceedings

June 13th, 2012 / 4:25 p.m.

Conservative

Peter Braid Kitchener—Waterloo, ON

Mr. Speaker, my hon. friend for Winnipeg North indicated his alleged support for small business. There is significant support for small- and medium-size businesses in the next phase of the government's economic action plan. For example, there is the doubling of resources for IRAP, which will have a significantly positive impact on high-tech companies in my riding of Kitchener—Waterloo, and there is $400 million for a venture capital fund, again providing capital for companies with high-growth potential.

Earlier my colleague from Etobicoke—Lakeshore clearly indicated that the Canadian innovation and commercialization program would be made permanent despite the intervention of our colleague across the floor. Now that we know that the CICP will be made permanent, will the Liberal Party vote in favour of our budget this evening?

Committees of the House
Routine Proceedings

4:25 p.m.

Liberal

Kevin Lamoureux Winnipeg North, MB

Mr. Speaker, it is interesting for a Conservative to say that we in the Liberal Party only have alleged concern for small- and medium-size businesses when in fact it was the Liberal Party of Canada that led the charge to ensure that small- and medium-size businesses were a part of the government agenda. It was the Liberal Party of Canada last fall that said this was about jobs, jobs, jobs, and we recognized the important role that small- and medium-size businesses play in ensuring that those jobs will be there. Instead, we saw the government bring in a budget document that I would argue does not deliver what is necessary for those small- and medium-size businesses to prosper and to be able to generate the—

Committees of the House
Routine Proceedings

4:25 p.m.

Conservative

The Acting Speaker Barry Devolin

Order, order.

Committees of the House
Routine Proceedings

4:25 p.m.

Liberal

Kevin Lamoureux Winnipeg North, MB

On a point of order, Mr. Speaker, I realize and recognize that a member is supposed to bring a point of order to the floor of the chamber at the moment he or she realizes there could be an infraction or something of that nature. During the vote, a serious issue was brought to my attention and there needs to be some clarification by the Speaker and possibly the clerks for the simple reason that I am anticipating that we could be going into a series of important votes. Here, all members of the House recognize the importance of being fully engaged in voting.

I feel that this is the most appropriate time for me to raise this issue, for the simple reason that we need to get guidance from the Clerk.

There are two components to it. The first one is with regard to the process or procedure for an individual member of Parliament when there is, let us say, a series of four or five votes. What is the proper procedure for a member to exit and possibly have to miss one vote in order to be able to—

Committees of the House
Routine Proceedings

4:30 p.m.

Conservative

The Acting Speaker Barry Devolin

Order, please.

The hon. member has risen on a point of order, but rather than raising a point of order he is asking for clarification of the rules. I would suggest that the rules, the Standing Orders of the House, are available here at the table. If members would like to refresh themselves on the rules related to votes, these are available to all members and obviously will be applied appropriately by the Chair.

The hon. member for Toronto Centre on the same point of order?

Oral Questions
Points of Order
Routine Proceedings

4:30 p.m.

Liberal

Bob Rae Toronto Centre, ON

Mr. Speaker, I have a different point of order that I would like to raise.

Since question period, I have had an opportunity to reflect on an exchange that took place between the Minister of National Defence and the member for St. John's East. Since the minister is here, perhaps he could comment on this.

In the course of his answer to the member for St. John's East, he accused the member for St. John's East of something called “mendaciousness”. I am a very up-to-date guy, having now had an opportunity to look up the word “mendacious”. I want people to know that mendacious, according to the dictionary, means “lying, untruthful, false, untrue”, and it goes on and on. Going through the dictionary there are many other examples in which it is very clear that mendacious means “given to lying, as in a mendacious child”; “untruthful”; “intentionally untrue”; and that a “mendacious statement” means “false, not in accordance with the fact or reality, as in giving false testimony under oath”.

My point is that the Minister of National Defence, in using a somewhat fancier word than perhaps we are used to hearing in the House, and certainly from that side of the House, in any event—

Oral Questions
Points of Order
Routine Proceedings

4:30 p.m.

Conservative

Bev Shipley Lambton—Kent—Middlesex, ON

He had to look it up, not us.

Oral Questions
Points of Order
Routine Proceedings

4:30 p.m.

Liberal

Bob Rae Toronto Centre, ON

I had to look it up. I am not ashamed of having to look it up.

I say to the hon. member, my good friend from Chatham, that he should look a few things up from time to time. It might do him some good.

The minister is standing up, Mr. Speaker, but I have not yet concluded my remarks. I know the minister has a habit of standing up long before—

Oral Questions
Points of Order
Routine Proceedings

4:30 p.m.

Conservative

The Acting Speaker Barry Devolin

Order, please. The hon. member for Toronto Centre has risen on a point of order and he is correct that he can make that point, but it is not up to individual members to determine when their time on the floor is completed. That is for the Chair to determine.

If the member for Toronto Centre could quickly summarize his point, I believe the Minister of National Defence is prepared to respond to that.