An Act to amend the Criminal Code (wearing of war decorations)

This bill was last introduced in the 37th Parliament, 1st Session, which ended in September 2002.

Sponsor

Stan Dromisky  Liberal

Introduced as a private member’s bill. (These don’t often become law.)

Status

Not active, as of March 15, 2001
(This bill did not become law.)

Elsewhere

All sorts of information on this bill is available at LEGISinfo, provided by the Library of Parliament. You can also read the full text of the bill.

Business Of The HouseOral Question Period

May 16th, 2001 / 3 p.m.
See context

Liberal

Stan Dromisky Liberal Thunder Bay—Atikokan, ON

Mr. Speaker, I rise on a point of order. I seek unanimous consent of the House to have Bill C-300, an act to amend the criminal code, wearing of war decorations, standing in my name on the order of precedence withdrawn and the order discharged.

Criminal CodeRoutine Proceedings

March 15th, 2001 / 10:10 a.m.
See context

Liberal

Stan Dromisky Liberal Thunder Bay—Atikokan, ON

moved for leave to introduce Bill C-300, an act to amend the Criminal Code (wearing of war decorations).

Mr. Speaker, it is a great pleasure to present the bill. It has taken four years of development. The process was very lengthy because of the involvement of a great number of players at various levels, from the highest level to the community level, in composing, rectifying and making the necessary changes to the bill.

It is a bill insofar as intent is concerned is very similar to one that was presented earlier this week in the House. However the legislative legal clerks of the House of Commons have indicated that the bill I am presenting is far more comprehensive and all encompassing and has some very unique characteristics. Therefore I am presenting it today.

The purpose of this enactment is to allow relatives of deceased or incapacitated veterans to wear on Remembrance Day at a public function or ceremony commemorating veterans, or in a circumstance prescribed by cabinet, any order, decoration or medal listed in the Canadian orders, declaration and medals directive of October 25, 1990, that is awarded to such veterans for war services, without facing criminal sanctions.

(Motions deemed adopted, bill read the first time and printed)