Family Farm Cost-of-Production Protection Act

An Act to provide cost-of-production protection for the family farm

This bill was last introduced in the 39th Parliament, 2nd Session, which ended in September 2008.

This bill was previously introduced in the 39th Parliament, 1st Session.

Sponsor

Pat Martin  NDP

Introduced as a private member’s bill. (These don’t often become law.)

Status

Not active, as of Sept. 29, 2006
(This bill did not become law.)

Summary

This is from the published bill. The Library of Parliament often publishes better independent summaries.

The purpose of this enactment is to provide cost-of-production protection to family farms in cases where the weighted average input cost of products typically produced or suited to production in a farming zone exceeds the weighted average netback to farm gate of such products, averaged over three years.

Costs are to be calculated on the basis of marketable product and thus will take into account bad weather, pests and other crop loss factors.

The calculations are to be based on normal crops or livestock produced for food or breeding and are to be approved by an independent auditor.

The enactment does not provide for support on a product-by-product basis and therefore is not a direct product subsidy.

Elsewhere

All sorts of information on this bill is available at LEGISinfo, provided by the Library of Parliament. You can also read the full text of the bill.

Family Farm Cost-of-Production Protection ActRoutine Proceedings

September 29th, 2006 / 12:05 p.m.
See context

NDP

Pat Martin NDP Winnipeg Centre, MB

moved for leave to introduce Bill C-356, An Act to provide cost-of-production protection for the family farm.

Mr. Speaker, I am very pleased to introduce this bill on behalf of farmers throughout Canada. The idea of this bill is to provide cost of production protection to family farms in cases where the weighted average input cost of products typically produced or suited to production in a farming zone exceeds the weighted average netback to the farm gate of such products, averaged over three years.

The costs, then, in this pricing formula would be calculated on the basis of marketable product. That way, they would take into account bad weather, pests and other crop loss factors. It is a lot more fair. It would be a huge help to prairie farmers. I am very proud that my colleague, the hon. member for Windsor West, is here to second this bill today.

(Motions deemed adopted, bill read the first time and printed)