An Act to amend the Criminal Code (credit for pre-sentencing custody)

This bill was last introduced in the 39th Parliament, 2nd Session, which ended in September 2008.

Sponsor

Rick Dykstra  Conservative

Introduced as a private member’s bill. (These don’t often become law.)

Status

Not active, as of Nov. 14, 2007
(This bill did not become law.)

Summary

This is from the published bill. The Library of Parliament often publishes better independent summaries.

This enactment amends the Criminal Code to provide that a person who spends time in custody before sentencing will be credited for that time at a ratio of one day of credit for every day served.

The ratio may be increased to one and a half days of credit for every day served if the judge is satisfied that there are exceptional circumstances that warrant it, but a person who has been detained as a result of a breach of a condition of judicial interim release is not eligible to receive any extra credit for pre-sentencing custody.

Elsewhere

All sorts of information on this bill is available at LEGISinfo, provided by the Library of Parliament. You can also read the full text of the bill.

Criminal CodeRoutine Proceedings

November 14th, 2007 / 3:10 p.m.
See context

Conservative

Rick Dykstra Conservative St. Catharines, ON

moved for leave to introduce Bill C-475, An Act to amend the Criminal Code (credit for pre-sentencing custody).

Mr. Speaker, I am honoured to introduce this private member's bill on behalf of my riding of St. Catharines and our country.

The proposed enactment will amend the Criminal Code to provide that a person who spends time in custody before sentencing will be credited for that time at a ratio of one day of credit for every day served. The ratio may be increased to one and one half days of credit for every day served if, and only if, the judge is satisfied that there are exceptional circumstances that warrant it. However, a person who has been detained as a result of a breach of a condition of judicial interim release is not eligible to receive any extra credit for pre-sentencing custody.

Convicted criminals should do the time for the crime for which they are sentenced.

(Motions deemed adopted, bill read the first time and printed)